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Pike County

African American rural settlements documented: 0

Pike County was established in 1816.  From the time of the first federal decennial census taken for the county in 1820 through 1870, there were never more than 20 African Americans enumerated.  Most of the black population lived in Monroe or Washington Township.  The 1880 county population census recorded 27 blacks.  The African American population escalated the last two decades of the nineteenth century; the census enumeration was 56 in 1890 and 147 in 1900.  

Much of the new black population was associated with the bustling mining industry during the 1880s. Many of the workers lived in Patoka Township.  There is a cemetery that remains from the community. The foundation and the steps to the Mount Hebron church are also still visible.   

Bibliography

The Coal Miner's Cry. Petersburg, Ind.:  Pike Central High School, ca. 1999.

U.S. Bureau of the Census. “Aggregate Amount of Each Description of Persons within District of Indiana,” 1: 352. Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Census Office, 1841.

U.S. Bureau of the Census. Population of Civil Divisions Less Than Counties; Table III State of Indiana,” 1:124 Seventh Census of the United States, 1850 Washington, D.C.: U.S. Census Office, 1852

U.S. Bureau of the Census. Population of Civil Divisions Less Than Counties; Table III State of Indiana,” 1:124 Eighth Census of the United States, 1860.  Washington, D.C.: U.S. Census Office, 1862

U.S. Bureau of the Census. “Population of Civil Divisions Less Than Counties; Table III—State of Indiana,” 1: 124. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1872.

Audrey C. Werle “Research Notes on Indiana African American History,” M 792, William Henry Smith Memorial Library, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Indiana.

By Lishawna Taylor, July 28, 2014