British Isles

English

Arnold Family Notebook, 1802-1815. M 0007. One box, one microfilm. Photocopies. Collection guide in library. John Arnold came from the Isle of Wight. Contains notations from gazetteers on what to take to America and good places to settle. 

Barker, John Family Papers, 1856-1864. SC 2385. Two folders. Photocopies. Collection guide online. Barker was a native of Lincolnshire, England, and moved to the United States in 1853, settling near Connersville but later moving about the state. His children who appear in the correspondence are Thomas, William, Barton, Frances and Mary. The family worked as blacksmiths and farmers. The collection consists of letters written by Barker and his family in Indiana to relatives in England. Topics include family news, the price of goods, rates for blacksmithing, master-worker relations in the U.S. and England, and freeing slaves during the Civil War.

Bethell-Warren Papers. M 0018, OM 0148, BV 0945-0956. Three manuscript boxes, twelve bound volumes, one oversize folder. Collection guide in library. The collection contains a letter from William Willmore, London, England, to brother, C. Harrison Willmore, Evansville, December 25, 1859.

Bevan, Philip Papers, 1836–1915. M 0019, BV 0957-0960. Three manuscript boxes, four bound volumes. No collection guide available. Bevan was an English carpenter and sailor. He was an immigrant to Charlestown, Clark County, Indiana (1843). He attended the Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio (1846-1849) and was a Presbyterian minister in Leavenworth (Crawford County), Byrneville (Harrison County), Martinsburg (Washington County), and other towns in southeastern Indiana. The papers include Bevan's letters, official documents, and financial papers, principally relating to his ministerial career (1846-1890). Also present in the collection is a diary (1836-1881), Bevan's poems, novels and other unpublished writings.

Clowes Family Collection, 1842–1998. M 1028. Seventy-one manuscript boxes, one oversized manuscript box, one bound volume, seven photograph boxes, five color photograph boxes, two OVA photograph boxes, one folder OVA color photograph, one OVA Glass Plate, one OVB photograph box, one OVB graphics box, one folder OVB color photograph, one OVC photograph box, eleven oversize folders, four boxes 35 mm slides, one box 35 mm negatives, one box 120 mm negatives, four VHS tapes, 50 reels 35 mm film, four boxes 16 mm film, seven cased image photographs, one box PAA photograph albums, three boxes PAB photograph albums, four boxes PAC photograph albums, artifacts. Collection guide online. George Henry Alexander Clowes (August 26, 1877-August 25, 1958) was a native of Ipswich, England. After graduating from the Royal College of Science in London and earning a Ph. D. in chemistry from the University of Gottingen, Germany, Clowes completed six months of post graduate studies at the Sorbonne, France. In 1901, he moved from England to Buffalo, New York, where he served as co-director of what was then the Gratwick Cancer Research Laboratories. In 1919, Clowes left Buffalo for Indianapolis and accepted a position with Eli Lilly and Company. After two years as a research associate with Lilly, Clowes was named research director. Following the discovery of insulin in 1921, Dr. Clowes was responsible for the mass production of the drug for the Eli Lilly Company. At the time of his retirement in 1946, Dr. Clowes was credited with directing research that developed protamine insulin, liver extract, hypnotic drugs, local anesthetics, antiseptics, and sulfonamide (organic sulfur compounds). The Clowes Family Archives is divided into twelve series ranging in date from the late 1800s through the 1990s.

Clowes Family Collection Addition, 1895-1963.  M 1177. Four manuscript boxes, four photograph boxes, one color photograph box, one OVA photograph box, one PAA photo album, one PAB photo album. Collection guide online. This collection represents an addition to the original Clowes Family Collection. (M 1028).

Cranstone, Lefevre J. Watercolor Paintings, circa 1861. P 0432. Five watercolor paintings. Collection guide online. Lefevre James Cranstone was a nineteenth-century English artist known primarily for genre-style landscapes in watercolor and oil. (Genre is a style of art that depicts scenes from everyday life.) He was born March 6, 1822, in Hemel Hempstead, England. From September 1859 to July 1860 Cranstone traveled to America with his younger brother Alfred for a stay of ten months. During his stay he documented his trip with a series of pen-and-ink and wash sketches. He and his brother visited relatives in Richmond, Indiana, from December 1859 to January 1860. Upon his return to Hemel Hempstead, Cranstone used his sketches to produce detailed watercolor and oil paintings.

English-speaking Union of the United States, Indianapolis Branch Records, 1922-2002. M 0644, OM 0304. Seven manuscript boxes, two oversize folders. Collection guide online. The English-Speaking Union was founded in New York in 1920 to strengthen relations between the U.S. and other English-speaking nations. Charles J. Lynn founded the Indianapolis branch in 1949. Lynn was followed as president by his wife Dorothy B. Lynn and Robert S. Ashby. The branch provides scholarships for British Commonwealth students to attend Indiana University and for Marion County teachers to study at British universities. The collection contains correspondence, programs, menus and a scrapbook of newspaper clippings. Records from Dorothy B. Lynn’s presidency form the bulk of the collection. Topics include program speakers, exchange students and teachers, visitors and scholarship drives. Also included are Charles J. Lynn’s materials on his founding of the local branch. 

Emigrants Notebook. SC 0546. One folder. No collection guide available. The notebook contains clippings and copies of letters from English emigrants, one of whom is from Evansville.

Evens, William Henry Letter, March 11, 1846. SC 0556. One folder. No collection guide available. Autobiographical letter from English born Evens, who was living in Fayette County, to uncle George Andrews, in Dover, New Hampshire.

Foster, Matthew Materials. SC 0587. One folder. Photocopies and typed transcripts. No collection guide available. The collection contains the paper, Pike County Indiana Ancestors of John Foster Dulles, by Ruth Miley McClellan. It also includes photocopies of letters of Matthew Foster to relatives in England, 1821-1824, and their typed transcripts.

Green, William Collection, circa 1911-1936. SC 2934. One folder. Collection guide online. William Green (1812-1912) was born on April 17, 1812, and grew up on a farm in Summerson, Huntingtonshire, England. Discouraged by low wages and conflict in Europe, Green immigrated to the United States at the age of 19. He departed from Liverpool on the ship Ceres and arrived in New York (bound for Evansville, Indiana) on June 6, 1831. Upon arriving in Indiana, Green cleared land in exchange for board, and soon after found work as a stage driver. In 1855, Green purchased land on the corner of Busseron and 2nd streets in Vincennes, Indiana and built the town’s first opera house. Though it burned down in 1885, the opera house was rebuilt later that year. Over the course of his life, Green also worked as a fire chief, a U.S. mail contractor and ran a successful livery stable in Vincennes. He died on December 24, 1912, at the age of 100.

Hill, Richard Notebook, 1829-1840. SC 0750. One folder. Collection guide in library. Most of the notebook was kept in England. There are mentions of Kirton Parish, Bush Village, and Ludborough. A few entries were written in Madison, Indiana, in 1840. 

Hodgson, Thomas Book. SC 0764. Two folders. Collection guide in library. The book contains accounts of Thomas Hodgson of Cumberland County, England, 1755-1786 with notes of Thomas Patterson who was born in England and immigrated to Virginia and Harrison County. The last entry is dated 1855. 

Hornbrook, Saunders Richard Diaries, 1864-1865. SC 0783. Two folders. Typed Transcripts. Collection guide in library. Though the collection is predominantly two Civil War diaries of Saunders Richard Hornbrook, there are five letters from an earlier Saunders Hornbrook, likely his ancestor. One of the letters was written from Fairstock, England to Connersville, Indiana.

IMA Clowes Collection, Ca. 1885-2000. M 1199. Eight manuscript boxes, one black-and-white photograph box, one color photograph box, one OVA photograph box, one OVA color photograph box, one OVA graphics box, one OVB graphics box, one PAB photo album, two PAC photo albums, two boxes 35mm slides, artifacts. Collection guide online. George Henry Alexander Clowes (August 26, 1877 - August 25, 1958) was a native of Ipswich, England. After graduating from the Royal College of Science in London and earning a Ph. D. in chemistry from the University of Gottingen, Germany, Clowes completed six months of post graduate studies at the Sorbonne, France. In 1901, he moved from England to Buffalo, New York, where he served as co-director of what was then the Gratwick Cancer Research Laboratories. In 1919, Clowes left Buffalo for Indianapolis and accepted a position with Eli Lilly and Company. After two years as a research associate with Lilly, Clowes was named research director. Following the discovery of insulin in 1921, Dr. Clowes was responsible for the mass production of the drug for Eli Lilly. At the time of his retirement in 1946, Dr. Clowes was credited with directing research that developed protamine insulin, liver extract, hypnotic drugs, local anesthetics, antiseptics, and sulfonamide (organic sulfur compounds). This collection consists of items transferred to the Indiana Historical Society from The Indianapolis Museum of Art on August 6, 2015. The bulk of the items pertain to Allen W. Clowes, although a small number of items relate to other members of the Clowes Family.

Ingle, John Correspondence, 1813-1868. M 0167, OM 0040. One manuscript box, one oversize folder. Collection guide online. John Ingle (1788-1874) immigrated from Somersham, England, to America in 1818. He settled near Saundersville (now Inglefield) in Vanderburgh County where he farmed and served as the town’s postmaster from 1823-1869. The collection consists primarily of correspondence of Ingle and his wife, Martha, with their family in England, 1813-1869. The letters discuss a variety of subjects including the differences between life in America and England, the development of Southern Indiana, conditions in England, the family business, and economic, religious, and political matters. Also included is John Ingle’s description of his trip from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Indiana, and his visit to Morris Birbeck’s Illinois settlement in 1818. There also are letters from the Ingle's son, John Jr., to his English relatives, 1834-1837. 

MacMillan, Harold Letter, 1951-1968. SC 2947. One folder. Collection guide online. Maurice Harold Macmillan, First Earl of Stockton, was born to parents Maurice Crawford Macmillan and Helen Belles on February 10, 1894, in London. A graduate of Eton College (1912), his schooling at Balliol (1912-1914) was interrupted by the outbreak of World War I. Macmillan first joined the 60th Rifles (KRRC), and then was transferred to the Grenadier Guards. In 1940, Churchill became the prime minister of the United Kingdom, and appointed Macmillan to the position of Junior Minister to the Ministry of Supply. Two years later, Churchill appointed Macmillan to the Allied Force Headquarters in Algiers, and he served in this position until the end of the war. Afterwards he lost his third bid at Stockton, and eventually represented Bromley in the House of Commons. The collection consists of correspondence and newspaper clippings dating from 1951 to 1968 pertaining to Harold Macmillan, former Prime Minister of Britain and Oxford University chancellor. Correspondence includes a personal, typewritten letter sent from Macmillan to Allen Beville Ramsay, then Cambridge University Vice-Chancellor and Magdalene College professor. Macmillan's mother, Helen Belles was raised in Spencer, Owen County, and his grandfather, Dr. Joshua T. Belles, is buried in Riverside Cemetery there.

Maidlow Family Papers, 1762–2005. SC 3054. Two folders. Collection guide online. The Maidlow Family migrated from Hampshire, England to the Evansville, Indiana area beginning in 1818. Farmer James Maidlow (1764–1851) left the town of Blendworth in 1818 with the intention of joining an English settlement in Illinois. In Blendworth he had also been a churchwarden and school charity trustee. This short collection consists of photocopied documents related to the Maidlow family.

New Harmony, Indiana Collection, 1814–1884, 1920, 1964. M 0219. Three manuscript boxes, three photograph folders, three OVA graphics boxes, one oversize graphics folder. Collection guide online. New Harmony, in Posey County in southwestern Indiana, was the site of two utopian experiments in the early 19th century. The first, the Harmony Society, was a group of German Pietists who had come to Pennsylvania in 1804 and founded a communist society. Led by George Rapp and his adopted son Frederick, they settled at New Harmony from 1815 to 1825, but then moved again, to Economy, Pennsylvania, on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh. In 1825, the New Harmony settlement was sold to the British industrialist and philanthropist, Robert Owen. There Owen attempted to put into effect his theories of socialism and human betterment. These were based on absolute equality of property, labor and opportunity, combined with freedom of speech and action. The Owenite community failed within two years, but Owen and his family continued both their ownership of the land at New Harmony and their interest in social reform. Many who believed in the ideals of these communities came to New Harmony. William Augustus Twigg, who was born in London, England, eventually settled in New Harmony and was appointed postmaster after the Civil War.

Stockdale, William Letters, 1865-1910. SC 1412. Five folders. No collection guide available. Stockdale immigrated to America during the Civil War, served in the Union Army, and lived in Henry and Hancock counties. The collection consists of letters to Stockdale from his family in Manchester, England.

Irish

Ancestors and Descendants of John Walker by Charles M. Andrews. F 0369. One reel of microfilm. No collection guide available. Information on a family from Ulster County, Ireland, who came to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and then moved to Indiana.

Baird, Emily J. Letter, 21 June 1859. SC 2410. One folder. Collection guide online. The collection contains a letter from Baird in Cloverdale to William J. Koons, Bethel, Kentucky. Topics include Baird’s garden and farm, visitors, bigotry and the intermarriage of Dutch and Irish.

Caldwell, David Letters, 1835-1838. SC 2099. One folder. Typescript copies. No collection guide available. Two letters from David and Alexander Caldwell in Wheeling, Virginia. (now West Virginia), to their parents in Ireland.

Caven, John Speeches and Poems. SC 0184. One folder. Collection guide in library. The collection contains several speeches and poems, including one speech on the Irish and Ireland.

Erskine, Andrew Letters. SC 0552. Two folders. Collection guide online. The William and Mary Erskine family was the second white family to settle in McCutchanville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana. They arrived there in 1819 from Antrim County, Ireland. The couple had four children: John, Andrew, William, and Mary. Andrew Erskine was born in Ireland in 1799 and immigrated to the United States with his family. He married Abigail Ewing in 1825. These two folders contain photocopies of correspondence with the Andrew Erskine family of McCutchanville, Indiana, between 1823 and 1917. John Molyneux, Henderson, Ky., 29 December 1823, tells of news of relatives in Ireland; letter of Amelia Fox McCutchan, Johnston County, Longford, Ireland, to Charles Johnstone near Evansville, 29 March 1824, lists troubles in Ireland and desire to come to America.

Hamilton, Allen Family and Legal Papers, 1814-1924. M 0608. Fifteen manuscript boxes. Collection guide online. An Irish immigrant and resident of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Allen Hamilton was a banker, Indian agent and local developer. He held various positions in the city’s government and established a business with Cyrus Taber based on Indian trade. He later served on Indian treaty commissions, and served one term in the Indiana state senate. The collection contains legal papers, title papers, correspondence, property assessment lists, land papers and deeds, Miami Indian treaties, an autograph book and a ledger. The legal papers (1828-1924) comprise half of the collection and are concerned with land grants. Title papers belong to Allen Hamilton and Cyrus, Phoebe, and Charlotte A. Taber. Correspondence between Hamilton and John Tipton deals with treaties with the Miami Indians and efforts to profit personally from the treaties. William Marshall is often referred to in these letters as a negative influence. Also included are Tipton’s estate papers, business and estate papers of Hamilton, and George C. and Stephen C. Taber. A ledger of lots in Rochester, Ind., and an autograph album are also included.

Hewitt, Joseph Letters, 1851-1872. SC 0745. Five folders. Typed transcripts. No collection guide available. Letters were written from Franklin County to Hewitt’s father in Ireland.

Indiana Circuit Court Records (Marion County), 1821-1868. M0553. Four manuscript boxes. Collection guide in library.  The records include suits and documents related to naturalization, mainly Irish and German. 

Kidd Family Papers, 1815-1887. M 0487. One  manuscript box.  Photocopies. Collection guide online. The Kidd family originated in Ireland. Samuel Kidd was born in County Armagh in 1782. He immigrated to the United States by 1808 and married Pamela A. Sampson in Baltimore, Maryland. They had three sons: James Hargrave, b. 1808; Samuel Cummings, b. 1813; and George Hugh, b. 1815. George moved to Texas and served in the army; he died of yellow fever in 1844. Samuel married Sarah Chauncey in Madison, Indiana in 1839. They had three sons; only one, John Dorsey (b. 1845) survived past age 6. In 1849, the family moved to Brewersville, Jennings County. When the Civil War began, Samuel Cummings Kidd and his son John enlisted. Samuel served with the 137th Indiana Volunteers and John with the 120th. Samuel was discharged in September 1864 due to ill health - he was 51 when he enlisted. After the war, John returned to Jennings County and married. He served as township treasurer and assessor for a number of years, his last term ending in 1890. The collection consists of correspondence, business papers, documents, contracts, genealogical materials and correspondence of three generations of the Kidd family. The earliest items are letters of Samuel Kidd dealing with property in Ireland (1815-1838). The letters of George Hugh Kidd, 1837-1844, discuss the situation between Mexico and Texas, and two letters from his widow to Samuel Kidd. The largest portion of the collection contains the letters of John Dorsey Kidd to his parents during the Civil War. The letters detail his experiences as his company traveled through Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. Letters to Samuel Kidd Sr. come from family members in Kentucky, Texas, Ohio and Indiana. Also included in the collection is a folder of various documents, and a folder of genealogical information and miscellaneous correspondence.

Knox, William Letter, 18 February 1792. SC 0932. One folder. No collection guide available. Letter to H. Remsen from Dublin, Ireland informing of public news, the Catholic business is the only subject of importance in agitation.

McClelland, Beattie Papers, 1835-1867. SC 2387, OM 0305. Two folders, one oversize folder. Collection guide online. McClelland was born in Ireland and came to America in 1827. He settled first in Pennsylvania, then in 1839, he moved to Winchester, and finally Columbus, Indiana in 1852. A lawyer by training, McClelland held many posts and positions, including director of the State Bank of Indiana, a commissioner of the Sinking Fund, and a judgeship. The collection contains official papers, including documents, deeds, commissions and licenses for McClelland. Included are his naturalization papers, commissions as deputy attorney general, judge, colonel, justice of the peace and commissioner of the Sinking Fund, law and teaching licenses, and deeds.

Ryan, John Military and Pension Records, 1861-1905. SC 2019. One folder. Photocopies. No collection guide available. Born in Kelly County, Kilenoy, Ireland. He immigrated to Richmond, and served in 36th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. Ryan died of typhus in 1862. The collection contains Ryan’s military records and pension records filed by his wife, Sarah Ryan.

Scots

Indianapolis Caledonian Club And The Scottish Society Of Indianapolis Records, 1915–2008. M 1173. One half-size manuscript box. Collection guide online. The Caledonian Club of Indianapolis was created in 1879 by six men, among whom were W. W. Howie, William Wallace, John & R.L. Jenkins (brothers), and John McGaw (who became the first president of the club). The first meeting was called on January 29, 1879. The club honored Scottish heritage and kept memories of Scotland in the hearts of those who had left it. Two of the ways in which club members honored their Scottish heritage were playing Scottish games and singing traditional Scottish songs. The Scottish Society of Indianapolis was created by founder and president, Carter Carlisle Keith, on Dec. 31, 1983. The collection is arranged in chronological order. Folder one contains the Caledonian Club materials which includes lists of members, correspondence, poems, programs and obituaries of former club members. The balance of the collection pertains to the Scottish Society of Indianapolis. The founding documents folder contains articles of incorporation, a certificate of incorporation, correspondence, drawings of crests and flags, a membership application, an International Festival '84 program, an informational pamphlet, and stationery. There is also a Scottish Society of Indianapolis confederation agreement with Clan Na Gael Pipe Band.

Lockerbie, George Correspondence. SC 0979. Two folders. Collection guide in library. The collection contains Lockerbie's correspondence with his daughter, Mrs. Thomas McOuat, and granddaughter, Elizabeth Ann McOuat, between 1830-1838.

New Harmony, Indiana Collection, 1814–1884, 1920, 1964. M 0219. Three manuscript boxes, three photograph folders, three OVA graphics boxes, one oversize graphics folder. Collection guide online. New Harmony, in Posey County in southwestern Indiana, was the site of two utopian experiments in the early nineteenth century. The first, the Harmony Society, was a group of German Pietists who had come to Pennsylvania in 1804 and founded a communist society. Led by George Rapp and his adopted son Frederick, they settled at New Harmony from 1815 to 1825, but then moved again, to Economy, Pennsylvania, on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh. In 1825 the New Harmony settlement was sold to the British industrialist and philanthropist, Robert Owen. There Owen attempted to put into effect his theories of socialism and human betterment. These were based on absolute equality of property, labor, and opportunity, combined with freedom of speech and action. The Owenite community failed within two years, but Owen and his family continued both their ownership of the land at New Harmony and their interest in social reform. Many who believed in the ideals of these communities came to New Harmony.  William Maclure who was born in Scotland founded the New Harmony Working Men's Institute.  New Harmony also attracted Scottish born Frances Wright. Wright wrote articles for the New Harmony Gazette and concurrently established a settlement at Nashoba, Tennessee where slaves could work out their liberty.  The experiment by Frances Wright in Tennessee failed.

Welsh

New Harmony, Indiana Collection, 1814–1884, 1920, 1964. M 0219. Three manuscript boxes, three photograph folders, three OVA graphics boxes, one oversize graphics folder. Collection guide online. New Harmony, in Posey County in southwestern Indiana, was the site of two utopian experiments in the early nineteenth century. The first, the Harmony Society, was a group of German Pietists who had come to Pennsylvania in 1804 and founded a communist society. Led by George Rapp and his adopted son Frederick, they settled at New Harmony from 1815 to 1825, but then moved again, to Economy, Pennsylvania, on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh. Robert Owen, who was born in Wales and had limited formal schooling, purchased New Harmony from Rapp in 1825 and attempted to put into effect his theories of socialism and human betterment. These were based on absolute equality of property, labor, and opportunity, combined with freedom of speech and action. He had the idea of establishing an industrial democracy and a model educational system attracting notable scientists and educators and many who believed in the ideals of these communities came to New Harmony. The Owenite community failed within two years, but Owen and his family continued both their ownership of the land at New Harmony and their interest in social reform.