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Irish

Ancestors and Descendants of John Walker by Charles M. Andrews. F 0369. One reel of microfilm. No collection guide available. Information on a family from Ulster County, Ireland, who came to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and then moved to Indiana.

Baird, Emily J. Letter, 21 June 1859. SC 2410. One folder. Collection guide online. The collection contains a letter from Baird in Cloverdale to William J. Koons, Bethel, Kentucky. Topics include Baird’s garden and farm, visitors, bigotry and the intermarriage of Dutch and Irish.

Caldwell, David Letters, 1835-1838. SC 2099. One folder. Typescript copies. No collection guide available. Two letters from David and Alexander Caldwell in Wheeling, Virginia. (now West Virginia), to their parents in Ireland.

Caven, John Speeches and Poems. SC 0184. One folder. Collection guide in library. The collection contains several speeches and poems, including one speech on the Irish and Ireland.

Erskine, Andrew Letters. SC 0552. Two folders. Collection guide online. The William and Mary Erskine family was the second white family to settle in McCutchanville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana. They arrived there in 1819 from Antrim County, Ireland. The couple had four children: John, Andrew, William, and Mary. Andrew Erskine was born in Ireland in 1799 and immigrated to the United States with his family. He married Abigail Ewing in 1825. These two folders contain photocopies of correspondence with the Andrew Erskine family of McCutchanville, Indiana, between 1823 and 1917. John Molyneux, Henderson, Ky., 29 December 1823, tells of news of relatives in Ireland; letter of Amelia Fox McCutchan, Johnston County, Longford, Ireland, to Charles Johnstone near Evansville, 29 March 1824, lists troubles in Ireland and desire to come to America.

Hamilton, Allen Family and Legal Papers, 1814-1924. M 0608. Fifteen manuscript boxes. Collection guide online. An Irish immigrant and resident of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Allen Hamilton was a banker, Indian agent and local developer. He held various positions in the city’s government and established a business with Cyrus Taber based on Indian trade. He later served on Indian treaty commissions, and served one term in the Indiana state senate. The collection contains legal papers, title papers, correspondence, property assessment lists, land papers and deeds, Miami Indian treaties, an autograph book and a ledger. The legal papers (1828-1924) comprise half of the collection and are concerned with land grants. Title papers belong to Allen Hamilton and Cyrus, Phoebe, and Charlotte A. Taber. Correspondence between Hamilton and John Tipton deals with treaties with the Miami Indians and efforts to profit personally from the treaties. William Marshall is often referred to in these letters as a negative influence. Also included are Tipton’s estate papers, business and estate papers of Hamilton, and George C. and Stephen C. Taber. A ledger of lots in Rochester, Ind., and an autograph album are also included.

Hewitt, Joseph Letters, 1851-1872. SC 0745. Five folders. Typed transcripts. No collection guide available. Letters were written from Franklin County to Hewitt’s father in Ireland.

Indiana Circuit Court Records (Marion County), 1821-1868. M0553. Four manuscript boxes. Collection guide in library.  The records include suits and documents related to naturalization, mainly Irish and German. 

Kidd Family Papers, 1815-1887. M 0487. One  manuscript box.  Photocopies. Collection guide online. The Kidd family originated in Ireland. Samuel Kidd was born in County Armagh in 1782. He immigrated to the United States by 1808 and married Pamela A. Sampson in Baltimore, Maryland. They had three sons: James Hargrave, b. 1808; Samuel Cummings, b. 1813; and George Hugh, b. 1815. George moved to Texas and served in the army; he died of yellow fever in 1844. Samuel married Sarah Chauncey in Madison, Indiana in 1839. They had three sons; only one, John Dorsey (b. 1845) survived past age 6. In 1849, the family moved to Brewersville, Jennings County. When the Civil War began, Samuel Cummings Kidd and his son John enlisted. Samuel served with the 137th Indiana Volunteers and John with the 120th. Samuel was discharged in September 1864 due to ill health - he was 51 when he enlisted. After the war, John returned to Jennings County and married. He served as township treasurer and assessor for a number of years, his last term ending in 1890. The collection consists of correspondence, business papers, documents, contracts, genealogical materials and correspondence of three generations of the Kidd family. The earliest items are letters of Samuel Kidd dealing with property in Ireland (1815-1838). The letters of George Hugh Kidd, 1837-1844, discuss the situation between Mexico and Texas, and two letters from his widow to Samuel Kidd. The largest portion of the collection contains the letters of John Dorsey Kidd to his parents during the Civil War. The letters detail his experiences as his company traveled through Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. Letters to Samuel Kidd Sr. come from family members in Kentucky, Texas, Ohio and Indiana. Also included in the collection is a folder of various documents, and a folder of genealogical information and miscellaneous correspondence.

Knox, William Letter, 18 February 1792. SC 0932. One folder. No collection guide available. Letter to H. Remsen from Dublin, Ireland informing of public news, the Catholic business is the only subject of importance in agitation.

McClelland, Beattie Papers, 1835-1867. SC 2387, OM 0305. Two folders, one oversize folder. Collection guide online. McClelland was born in Ireland and came to America in 1827. He settled first in Pennsylvania, then in 1839, he moved to Winchester, and finally Columbus, Indiana in 1852. A lawyer by training, McClelland held many posts and positions, including director of the State Bank of Indiana, a commissioner of the Sinking Fund, and a judgeship. The collection contains official papers, including documents, deeds, commissions and licenses for McClelland. Included are his naturalization papers, commissions as deputy attorney general, judge, colonel, justice of the peace and commissioner of the Sinking Fund, law and teaching licenses, and deeds.

Ryan, John Military and Pension Records, 1861-1905. SC 2019. One folder. Photocopies. No collection guide available. Born in Kelly County, Kilenoy, Ireland. He immigrated to Richmond, and served in 36th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. Ryan died of typhus in 1862. The collection contains Ryan’s military records and pension records filed by his wife, Sarah Ryan.

Scots

Indianapolis Caledonian Club And The Scottish Society Of Indianapolis Records, 1915–2008. M 1173. One half-size manuscript box. Collection guide online. The Caledonian Club of Indianapolis was created in 1879 by six men, among whom were W. W. Howie, William Wallace, John & R.L. Jenkins (brothers), and John McGaw (who became the first president of the club). The first meeting was called on January 29, 1879. The club honored Scottish heritage and kept memories of Scotland in the hearts of those who had left it. Two of the ways in which club members honored their Scottish heritage were playing Scottish games and singing traditional Scottish songs. The Scottish Society of Indianapolis was created by founder and president, Carter Carlisle Keith, on Dec. 31, 1983. The collection is arranged in chronological order. Folder one contains the Caledonian Club materials which includes lists of members, correspondence, poems, programs and obituaries of former club members. The balance of the collection pertains to the Scottish Society of Indianapolis. The founding documents folder contains articles of incorporation, a certificate of incorporation, correspondence, drawings of crests and flags, a membership application, an International Festival '84 program, an informational pamphlet, and stationery. There is also a Scottish Society of Indianapolis confederation agreement with Clan Na Gael Pipe Band.

Lockerbie, George Correspondence. SC 0979. Two folders. Collection guide in library. The collection contains Lockerbie's correspondence with his daughter, Mrs. Thomas McOuat, and granddaughter, Elizabeth Ann McOuat, between 1830-1838. Lockerbie was a Scot.

New Harmony, Indiana Collection, 1814–1884, 1920, 1964. M 0219. Three manuscript boxes, three photograph folders, three OVA graphics boxes, one oversize graphics folder. Collection guide online. New Harmony, in Posey County in southwestern Indiana, was the site of two utopian experiments in the early nineteenth century. The first, the Harmony Society, was a group of German Pietists who had come to Pennsylvania in 1804 and founded a communist society. Led by George Rapp and his adopted son Frederick, they settled at New Harmony from 1815 to 1825, but then moved again, to Economy, Pennsylvania, on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh. In 1825 the New Harmony settlement was sold to the British industrialist and philanthropist, Robert Owen. There Owen attempted to put into effect his theories of socialism and human betterment. These were based on absolute equality of property, labor, and opportunity, combined with freedom of speech and action. The Owenite community failed within two years, but Owen and his family continued both their ownership of the land at New Harmony and their interest in social reform. Many who believed in the ideals of these communities came to New Harmony.  William Maclure who was born in Scotland founded the New Harmony Working Men's Institute.  New Harmony also attracted Scottish born Frances Wright. Wright wrote articles for the New Harmony Gazette and concurrently established a settlement at Nashoba, Tennessee where slaves could work out their liberty.  The experiment by Frances Wright in Tennessee failed.

Welsh

New Harmony, Indiana Collection, 1814–1884, 1920, 1964. M 0219. Three manuscript boxes, three photograph folders, three OVA graphics boxes, one oversize graphics folder. Collection guide online. New Harmony, in Posey County in southwestern Indiana, was the site of two utopian experiments in the early nineteenth century. The first, the Harmony Society, was a group of German Pietists who had come to Pennsylvania in 1804 and founded a communist society. Led by George Rapp and his adopted son Frederick, they settled at New Harmony from 1815 to 1825, but then moved again, to Economy, Pennsylvania, on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh. Robert Owen, who was born in Wales and had limited formal schooling, purchased New Harmony from Rapp in 1825 and attempted to put into effect his theories of socialism and human betterment. These were based on absolute equality of property, labor, and opportunity, combined with freedom of speech and action. He had the idea of establishing an industrial democracy and a model educational system attracting notable scientists and educators and many who believed in the ideals of these communities came to New Harmony. The Owenite community failed within two years, but Owen and his family continued both their ownership of the land at New Harmony and their interest in social reform.