Guide to Women's History Materials

in Manuscript and Visual Collections at the

Indiana Historical Society

 

Introduction

Individuals and Families

A-D|E-H|I-L|M-P|Q-T|U-Z

Organizations and Projects

A-D|E-H|I-L|M-P|Q-T|U-Z

Originally compiled by
Alexandra S. Gressitt, 1997

Updated August 2000 (Glenn McMullen),
March 2003 (Pam Tranfield), and April 2004 (Glenn McMullen)

 

 

Introduction

This guide describes manuscript and visual collections in the William Henry Smith Memorial Library of the Indiana Historical Society (IHS) that document experiences of women in Indiana, the Midwest, and the Old Northwest Territory. IHS has collected women's history for many years, and in 1986 the Society's Board of Trustees approved women's history as one of eight special collecting areas for the library. At about the same time, the library began working with the Indiana Women's History Archives, Inc. (now the Indiana Women’s History Association, IWHA), an organization founded in 1983. IWHA believed that the recent papers and records of Indiana women and women's organizations were in danger of being lost for lack of a central repository to house them, and a survey funded by the Lilly Endowment confirmed that belief. With support from IWHA over the last 15 years, IHS expanded its collecting goals in women's history to include recent materials as well as materials documenting women's history in the Hoosier state in earlier periods.

For each collection described below the following information is provided:

·        Collection title

·        Collection number: M (for collections one document case or greater), P for collections made primarily of photographs, graphics, or other visual material, SC (for collections less than one document case), BV (for bound volumes such as scrapbooks and ledgers), OM (for oversize manuscripts less than one box), OMB (for oversize manuscripts one box or greater), F (microfilm), CT (cassette tapes)

·        Size of collection: box, folder, volume, microfilm reel, or cassette tape quantities

·        The availability of a collection guide describing the collection, usually at the folder level

·        Entry number [e.g. A-100] in Eric Pumroy and Paul Brockman, A Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library (Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society, 1986). This guide, available in many research libraries, may provide additional information on the collections for which there are entries.

·        Brief description of the collection

Additional access points to manuscript collections include OCLC (Online Computer Library Center, Inc.) and NUCMC (National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections). The library's online catalog is another source of information on manuscript collections. Many collection guides are available on the IHS website. Newly-cataloged collections and collection guides are added to the online catalog and website regularly; please check them for recent additions.

Other subject guides available from the Indiana Historical Society or on our website include:

·        Brockman, Paul A. Guide to Ethnic History Materials in Manuscript Collections at the Indiana Historical Society, 2002

·        Gibbs, Wilma L. Guide to African American Printed Sources at the Indiana Historical Society, 1997

·        -----. Guide to African-American History Materials in Manuscript Collections at the Indiana Historical Society, 2002

One hundred eleven additional women's history collections have added  to this guide since 1997, when the first version (and only printed edition) of the guide was published. These collections have been added to this Web edition of the guide, updated in March 2003.

We expect to add newly-processed collections to the Web version of this guide on a quarterly basis. Inserts containing information on new collections will be added to printed copies of the guide to keep them up to date. These printed copies, along with current inserts, are available to researchers at no cost while supplies last.

If you have women's history manuscript materials of potential interest that you might like to donate, or for further information on women's manuscript collections at IHS, contact:

Glenn L. McMullen
Director, Manuscript and Visual Collections
317-234-0047
gmcmullen@indianahistory.org

Indiana Historical Society
450 West Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202-3269

Individuals and Families

ALBRIGHT, LIBBIE M. Diaries, 1871-1885.  1 manuscript box. Collection guide online. Libbie M. Albright (b. ca. 1858) was the daughter of Joseph Reeder and Margaret (nee Norris) Albright of Saint Joseph County, Ind. She was a founder of the Good Templars Lodge, New Carlisle, Ind. Maude Evans (b. 1878) may have been the daughter of Joseph Albright and Louisa McPhee.  The collection includes five diaries written by Libbie M. Albright of New Carlisle, Olive Township, Saint Joseph County, Ind., between 1871-72 and 1874-76. The diaries mainly discuss routine activities of the Albright family and social events in Olive Township. A letter from Maude Evans of Dakota Territory to Ella Albright includes family news and personal questions. Also included is Maude's Bible.


ANDREWS, L. O. Letter, 1937.  SC 1972.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  Natalie Fenelon, an African American education student at Indiana University, was not permitted, because of segregation, to complete her student teaching at Bloomington High School.  The letter in this collection, written by L. O. Andrews, Assistant Director of Supervised Teaching, Indiana University, to Professor Teter in the Physiology Department, requests an excused absence from class for Fenelon to enable her to complete her student teaching at Crispus Attucks High School in Indianapolis.


ARMSTRONG, IRVEN. Collection, 1918–1996 (bulk, 1918–1992).  M07451 box.  Collection guide online.  The collection contains letters written by female students to Sergeant Irven Armstrong. The young women attended Indianapolis Public Schools #17.  In general, the letters wish him well, commend his war service, express homefront support of American soldiers, comment on the effects of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic, thank him for keeping America safe for Democracy, and bid him a safe return.  The letters, executed with good penmanship, contain the signatures and addresses of the students, all who lived within blocks of the near westside school. All letters are dated 7 November 1918.


ARMSTRONG, JOHN H. Family papers, 1828-1957.  M 0410, OM 0112.  3 boxes, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-9.  John H. Armstrong, son of Col. John Armstrong, was a cabinetmaker, lumber dealer, and farmer in La Porte, Indiana.  He and his wife Susannah Beggs Armstrong were active in the spiritualist movement. Armstrong's family included Alphonso Adkins, a La Porte railroadman, and Adkins's children Irvin Ryan Adkins and Alta Viola Adkins, a Hammond, Lake County, Indiana, schoolteacher.  The collection contains family correspondence (1850–1902), including notes on religion and spiritualism and family genealogy.


BAILEY, AUDRA. Papers, 1965–1991.  M 0587.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  Audra [Snyder] Lindley Bailey was born in Amboy, Marion County, Indiana, in 1909.  She graduated from Indiana University in 1930 and received a master's degree in administration from Butler University in 1944.  While her teaching career spanned the years 1931–79 she was also active in many civic, service, and church organizations.  Materials in this collection--correspondence, committee minutes and reports, high school newsletters and programs, articles and clippings--focus on Audra Bailey's involvement in education and women's rights.


BAILEY, SARAH. Papers, 1820–1895.  SC 0040.  6 folders.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-14.  Sarah Bailey, born 1835, lived in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, and married William Gilbert in 1865.  The bulk of the papers (1853–72) are from suitors, relatives in Wayne County, and relatives and friends serving in the Union Army during the Civil War.


BAIRD, EMILY J. Letter, 1859.  SC 2410.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  One item, a letter dated 21 June 1859, written by Emily J. Baird of Cloverdale, Putnam County, Indiana, to her brother William J. Koons, of Bethel, Bath County, Kentucky.  The letter describes the writer's garden, the operation of the farm, the people of Indiana, and local trends in weddings.


BAKER, JENNIE. Papers, 1884–1930.  M 0434, BV 2144–2145.  1 box, 2 volumes.  Collection guide online.  Jennie Baker lived in Kendallville, Noble County, Indiana.  The collection contains family correspondence to and from Baker, primarily during the Spanish-American War.


BANTZ FAMILY. Photograph album, ca. 1890-ca. 1946.  P0289.1 album. Collection guide online. Martin Levi (Mort) Bantz (1876-1954) and Cornelia Ford Bantz (1863-1948) operated the Senate Saloon at 123 Washington Street in Hartford City, Indiana, from ca. 1907 to ca. 1916.  The album contains photographs depicting the social and family life of the Bantz family. Included are images of the Bantz children, James (b. 1906) and Florence (b. 1910), employees of the saloon, and candid photographs of groups of women drinking from bottles of beer. Florence Banz, aged about six, also poses with a bottle of beer.


BARLOW, CHARITY. Papers, 1820.  SC 2307.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  This collection consists of one letter written by Charity Addams Barlow in Princetown (Princeton), Gibson County, Indiana, to her parents in New York, describing various diseases rampant in Indiana during 1820.


BARNARD, HARRY EVERETT. Papers, 1888-1847.  M 0010, OM 0115.  18 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize folder, 1 folder photographs. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-22.  Marion Harvie Barnard (1875-ca. 1969) arrived in the United States from England in the 1890s. She married H. E. Barnard, a chemist, ca.. 1901. She was treasurer of the Indiana Equal Suffrage Association and a member of the Woman's Franchise League of Indiana.  Alice Harvie Duden (1873-1926) attended Philadelphia Dental College (later Temple University School of Dentistry) and practiced dentistry in Concord, N.H., and Indianapolis, Ind. She also taught at the Indiana Dental College. She was married to Hans Duden, a chemist at Kingan and Company (meat packers).  The collection includes personal correspondence of the Barnard and Duden familes, particularly between Harryand Marion Barnard and Alice Harvie Duden. Also included are love letters exchanged between Marion Harvie and HarryBarnard. Included are descriptions of the Naval Proving Grounds at Indiana Head, Md. One letter, signed by Carrie Chapman Catt, concerns the Woman's Suffrage Association. Alice Harvie Duden's letters to the Barnardfamily concern daily life at the Philadelphia Dental College and the problems of establishing a dental practice.


BARNER-JONES FAMILY. Papers, 1828–1971.  M 0689, BV 3179–3182, OM 0098.  6 boxes, 4 volumes, 4 folders.  Collection guide online.  This collection includes papers of the Barner, Collett, and Jones families of Indiana.  The bulk of the collection represents the life activities of John Barner (1810–1892) and David M. Jones (1828–1865).  Included in the collection are two small series: one of correspondence and diaries relating to Nellie Jones (1858–1905), daughter of David M. and Ellen [Collett] Jones, and a second of Ellen [Collett] Jones (1833–1924), wife of David M. Jones.


BARNETT FAMILY CORRESPONDENCE. ca. 1849–1890.  M0733.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  The collection consists of correspondence of the Barnett family of Cass and Pulaski Counties.  Maria (Cook) Barnett wrote most of the letters in the collection, largely to her son George H. Barnett and his family.  Maria’s letters detail daily family activities and news.  Her later correspondence originated from Logansport, Winimac, and Pleasant Grove, Indiana.


BARNUM, CAROLINE C. Journal, 1851.  SC 0063.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Caroline Cornelia Barnum (1833–1911) was a daughter of Phineas T. Barnum (1810–1890).  She married David W. Thompson and lived in Connecticut.  This collection consists of one bound volume.  The first fifteen pages form part of a journal kept by Caroline C. Barnum during April 1851 while accompanying Jenny Lind's concert tour.  It describes events as the tour passed through Louisville, Kentucky; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Madison, Indiana.


BARTEAU, BETTY SCALES. Research papers, ca. 1994–1997.  M 0716, CT 0808.  3 boxes, 1 cassette audiotape, and 4 folders of visual material.  Collection guide online.  A native of Boonville, Indiana, Barteau was admitted to the Indiana Bar in 1965.  She served as deputy prosecutor in Spencer and Warrick Counties, Indiana, practiced law in Marion County, Indiana, and served as Marion County Superior Court judge.  Since 1991 she has served as a judge on the Indiana Court of Appeals, fifth district.  The collection contains research material collected by Barteau for "Thirty Years of the Journey of Indiana's Women Judges, 1964–1994" published as vol. 30, no. 1 of the Indiana Law Review.  Included are questionnaires (with biographical information about participating judges), drafts, notes, photocopied articles, and correspondence.


BECK, MARJORIE. Collection. 1842–1970.  M 0669, OM 0349.  9 boxes, 3 folders.  Collection guide in library.  This collection is the result of genealogical research conducted by the donor, Marjorie Hopper Beck.  Miriam Retherford Colvin, dietician, teacher, and world traveler, is one of the family members on whom research was conducted.


BELLAMY, Flavius Josephus. Family photographs. ca. 1860–ca. 1870.  P 0330.  4 folders. Collection guide in library. Bellamy was born 4 October 1838 in Switzerland County, Indiana. He represented Switzerland and Ohio Counties in the state senate in 1867 and Ripley and Switzerland Counties in 1869. The collection contains twenty-six cartes-de-visite photographs and six tintypes of Bellamy’s friends and relatives. These include Christine Hart Bellamy and Jennie Snyder Bellamy, a singer.


BEMENT, ANNA L. Letter, ca. 1850.  SC 2422.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  This collection consists of one letter written about 1850 by Anna L. Bement in Vincennes, Knox County, Indiana, to William H. Law, Evansville, Indiana.  She describes her trip, by boat and wagon, with her husband from Evansville, Vanderburgh County, to Vincennes.


BENSON, NELLIE. Letter, 1868.  SC 2218.  1 folder.  No collection guide available. This collection consists of one letter written by a schoolgirl to her grandmother on 28 February 1868.  The writer, Nellie Benson, has recently moved from an unknown location to Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Her letter discusses school, and her feelings of loneliness.


BISHOP, JOHN M. Diaries and Papers, 1835–1887.  M 0465.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  John M. Bishop (1819–1890) was an itinerant Presbyterian minister in Indiana.  He married Lucy D. North (1823–?) of Oxford, Ohio, on 10 November 1846.  This collection consists of Bishop's diaries and the records of the Lane Seminary Literary Society.  Included in this collection is a travel diary of Bishop's sister-in-law, Jane North Lewis (1835–36), detailing her travels in Florida, Louisiana, and New England; a writing book of Bishop's wife, Lucy (1840–70); and an 1855 Salem Female Seminary flyer.


BLACK, MARY. Collection, 1855–1993.  M 0675, OM 0303.  6 boxes, 3 folders.  Collection guide online.  Mary Black (d. 1993) was a 1923 graduate of Butler University and a lifelong resident of Indianapolis.  Her father, Frank Morris Black, was related to, and worked for, the Wasson Department Store.  A sister, Dorothy, also a Butler graduate, married Charles J. Lynn, an executive of the Eli Lilly Company and philanthropist.  The bulk of this collection consists of personal correspondence of Frank and Agnes [Herd] Black and Dorothy and Charles Lynn.  Family matters, business concerns, World War I experiences, Butler University class reunions, and the Visiting Nurses' Association are some of the subjects.  The collection also includes a 1901 calendar hand-painted by Mary Black.  Each of its twelve pages has a colored sketch, together with one or two quotations, some indicating the name of both the author and the person who chose the quotation.


BLACKBURN, DORA ATKINS. Collection, 1926–1978.  M 0634.  5 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  Dora Atkins Blackburn was born in Indianapolis and attended Butler University.  After her mother’s death, she and her sister Murray Atkins took over Atkins Flower Shop, started by her mother.  Dora Atkins operated the flower shop in Indianapolis for over fifty years.  The collection contains several photographs of Blackburn, including a 1910 photograph of Blackburn with three classmates crocheting at school.  The collection contains materials related to the Blackburn genealogy; Blackburn’s mother, Dora Graham Atkins; and her father, Calvin R. Atkins, a physician.  A 1937 letter from Arthur T. Long refers to an article about Dora Blackburn that appeared in Opportunity, the news magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.  The collection includes photographs and clippings about the Atkins Flower Shop, including a guest list from the 50th anniversary celebration of the business.  Mayor William H. Hudnut proclaimed November 20, 1977 Dora Atkins Blackburn day in Indianapolis.  Items relating to Calvin R. Atkins include a copy of the first annual report (1910) of Lincoln Hospital, established by black physicians to serve African Americans in Indianapolis at a time of rigid segregation and critical health care concerns.


BOLTON, SARAH TITTLE BARRETT. Papers, 1832–1893.  SC 0108.  1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Sarah Tittle Barrett Bolton (1814–1893) was born in Newport, Kentucky, the oldest of six children of Esther Pendleton and Jonathan Belcher Barrett.  The family moved to a frontier farm in Indiana on Six-Mile Creek northeast of Vernon in Jennings County while Bolton was still a child.  She married Nathaniel Bolton of Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana, an editor, in 1831.  Later she married Addison Reese.  Bolton was a leader in the early movement for women's legal rights and aided Robert Dale Owen in his successful fight in the State Constitutional Convention of 1850 and the legislature of 1851 for personal property rights for married women.  This collection includes documents, correspondence, and poetry concerning Bolton's life.  There is an 1882 letter from Bolton to W. W. Woolen concerning Robert Dale Owen's efforts during the 1850 Indiana Constitutional Convention to secure rights for women.


BOSTON, DELBERT D. Papers, 1881–1960.  M 0314.  3 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-39.  Delbert D. Boston, born 1866, was a barber in Findlay, Ohio, and Harlan, Allen County, Indiana.  He married Ella Furney of Harlan in 1889.  The collection includes correspondence between Boston and his fiancee and wife and letters from his daughter while attending Indiana Normal School at Terre Haute, Vigo County, in 1908.


BOWERS, SYBIL M. AND CLAUDE G. Letters, ca. 1932–ca. 1952.  M 0767.  1 box, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  The collection includes sixty-five letters, mostly from Sybil McCaslin Bowers (1879–1958) to Jessie E. Moore (ca. 1881–1962).  The women attended Indiana Normal School together and remained friends following Sybil’s marriage to Claude Gernade Bowers in 1911.  Jessie E. Moore taught school at Emmerich Manual Training High School in Indianapolis.  Claude Bowers served as American ambassador to Spain (1933–1939) and Chile (1939–1953) while Sybil acted as hostess at the embassy residences.  The letters, written mostly from France, Spain, and Chile, discuss social activities, the furniture and structure of embassy compounds, and the surrounding countryside.  Sybil rarely comments on her husband’s official activities.  One letter is from Sybil’s daughter, Pat Bowers, thanking Jessie for a Christmas gift.


BRANDT, MARIE ESTER. Diaries, 1849–1869.  M 0024, F 0991–0992.  1 box, 2 microfilm reels.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-43.  Brandt was a Quaker Sabbath schoolteacher in Hanover, Jefferson County, Indiana, and daughter of a farmer and general store owner in Hanover.  The diary entries describe daily life, social activities, and Civil War experiences in the towns of Hanover and Madison and at Hanover College.


BRITTS, EDNA EARL BRENT. Diary, 1910.  SC 1891.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  This diary consists of notes of personal activities and local events in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana, in 1910.


BROKENBURR, ROBERT LEE. Papers, 1941–1973.  M 0492, BV 2432–2434, OM 0223.  1 box, 3 volumes, 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  While the bulk of this collection pertains to the Indiana senate and judicial career of Robert Brokenburr, it also includes papers (1949–65) of his daughter Alice Olga Brokenburr Ray.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


BROWN, CLAYTON. Letter, 1849.  SC 2393.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Millicent Ann Stratton lived in New London, Howard County, Indiana.  This collection consists of one letter (15 August 1849) from Stratton to Clayton Brown of Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana.  It discusses the cholera epidemic and the town of Boston.


BUCKLEY, SARAH. Letters, 1866–1867.  SC 0147.  1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Letters from Annie M. Livermore (Mrs. Thomas), Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana; R. Buckley, New Albany, Floyd County, Indiana; and Annie Crawford, La Porte, La Porte County, Indiana; to Mrs. Sarah Buckley, Media, Delaware County, Pennsylvania.  Letters concern woolen mills in Pennsylvania and Indiana.


BURCH, BETTY ANN. Papers, 1940–1949.  SC 2545.  4 folders.  Collection guide online.  Betty Ann Burch lived in East Chicago, Lake County, Indiana, during the 1940s.  This collection contains items relating to her years at Roosevelt High School to her position as mechanical draftsman at Edward Valve and Manufacturing Company.


CANNON, AMELIA. Papers, 1861–circa 1869.  M 0770. 1 manuscript box, 1 photograph. Collection guide online.  Amelia M. Cannon (1847-1919) was born near South Milford, La Grange County, Indiana, to farmers William H. and Julian Cannon. After the Civil War she married Morten or Henry Shipe. During the Civil War she received letters from Alfred Shields (ca. 1841-1863) A friend, Hattie Oiler (b. ca. 1848), lived in Noble County, Ind. in 1860. Two letters from Oiler discuss social activities and Hattie's appreciation of practical jokes. Three pencil sketches show landforms, possibly depicting topography near Civil War encampments. Amelia likely wrote original poems contained in the collection.


CASE, LOUELLA I. B. Letter, 1847.  SC 0180.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  A letter from Louella Case, 2 June 1847, Patriot, Switzerland County, Indiana, to her brother, Levi S. Bartlett, in New Hampshire.  The letter describes continued illness, expresses a desire to travel east as soon as possible, and describes a funeral procession, "primitive western towns," the climate on the Ohio River, and medical treatments and rural physicians.


CHAPIN, LUCIUS. PAPERS, 1859–1865.  M 0581.  2 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  The collection consists of 238 letters, the majority of which were written between Lucius P. Chapin and his wife, Alice, during Chapin’s service in the Union Army during the Civil War (1862–1865).  Alice wrote from home in Putnam County, Indiana, as well as from her travels in Iowa and Utica (N.Y.?).  The couple discussed topics such as the death and morning of their son in September 1862, love and loneliness, financial worries, and the difficulties of one person maintaining a household.


CHESTER, EMMA LEE. Collection, Black Women in the Middle West Project, 1962–1985.  M 0498.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  This collection contains correspondence, clippings, award certificates, and materials pertaining to Chester's community, educational, and religious activities.  Included in this collection are papers of Julia Davis, a worker for the Marion County Department of Public Welfare. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


CHILDS, HESTER B. Collection, 1944–1987.  M 0676.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  Hester Blanche Childs (1909–1987), although born in Duncan, Mississippi, lived most of her life in Indianapolis.  A nurse by profession, Childs was also active in numerous civic and social organizations.  The collection contains materials relating to Childs and other family members and highlights her activities in various clubs and organizations.


CHRISTIAN, MARY DUBIN. Journal, 1919. SC 1923.  1 volume.  No collection guide available.  The collection contains a photocopy of the typewritten transcript of a journal kept by Mary Durbin Christian during a trip she and Ira W.  Christian made to Salem, Indiana, in 1919 to research his mother's family history.  The account includes reports of visiting with various people, local stories, and rememberances.


CLAPP, MATTIE RAMSEY. Papers, 1878–1903.  SC 2506.  4 folders.  Collection guide online.  Mattie Ramsey Clapp lived in Clark and Scott Counties, Indiana.  She began teaching in 1873.  By 1878 she was married to G.A. Ramsey, who died or disappeared around 1879.  By 1884 she met J. Valentine Clapp, and married him by 1888.  In 1892 she was still teaching school.  Correspondence, much from the courtship of Mattie Ramsey and J. Valentine Clapp.  Other correspondents include friends, family, and teaching colleagues.  Topics include the philosophy of agnostic Robert Green Ingersoll and teaching.


CLEMENTS, ELIAS C. Correspondence, February–October, 1865.  SC 2638.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Clements was a resident of Huron, Lawrence County, Indiana.  During the Civil War he served with the 145th Indiana Regiment from Feb. 1, 1865 to Jan. 21, 1866.  The regiment saw service primarily in Georgia, doing railroad guard duty.  The collection contains nine letters between Clements and his wife, Sarah, and daughter, Martha, written between February and October 1865.  Clements writes of his activities, mainly in Georgia; his wife writes of family matters.


COLEMAN, SALLIE E. Diary, 1889.  SC 2453.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Sallie E. [Downing] Coleman (ca. 1860–1947) was the daughter of Col. Michael A. Downing and wife of John H. Vajen, Jr., and then William Henry Coleman.  She was an active volunteer for the American Red Cross and the Indianapolis Flower Mission. Coleman's diary describes her wedding trip to Europe with William Coleman, May to September 1889.


COLEMAN, SALLIE E. Scrapbook, 1922–1950.  SC 2617.  5 folders.  Collection guide online.  Sallie E. [Downing] Coleman (ca. 1860–1947) was the daughter of Col. Michael A. Downing and wife of John H. Vajen, Jr., and then William Henry Coleman.  She was an active volunteer for the American Red Cross and the Indianapolis Flower Mission.  This collection consists of material from a scrapbook kept by Sallie Coleman and includes correspondence, greeting cards, and newspaper clippings, 1922–50.


CONN, HARRIETTE BAILEY. Collection, 1909–1990.  M 0692, OM 0370.  9 boxes and 3 oversize folders.  Collection guide online.  Conn was a native of Indianapolis.  She attended Talladega College and in 1955 earned a law degree from Indiana University.  From 1955 to 1965 Conn served as deputy attorney general, a position her father had held.  She later practiced law, served as a state representative, assistant city attorney, and state public defender.  The collection contains materials relating to Conn and her family, her organizational affiliations, and her legal and political career.  Included is personal and general correspondence; political campaign materials; items concerning her death and estate; family papers from her children and father, Robert L. Bailey; items and scrapbooks from Conn's student days at Talladega College including letters from her mother, Nelle Vesta Conn; materials relating to her numerous affiliations, including Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and the Marion County Bar Association; legal appeals, briefs, petitions, summaries, and other case materials from Conn's work as state public defender; miscellaneous materials on local politics and events, obituaries, and newsclippings; photos of Conn and her family; and several artifacts.


COOPER, PAULA. Case records, 1986–1989.  M 0565.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  This collection contains letters, petitions, clippings, cards, telegrams, and lists of signatures addressed to the Indiana Supreme Court (1986–89), seeking a reprieve of a death sentence rendered against Cooper (b. 1970) for murder.


COPPEDGE, RUTH WRIGHT. Diary, 1917–1918.  BV 2569–2569a.  2 volumes.  No collection guide available.  Ruth Coppedge served as a nurse during World War I and at City Hospital, Indianapolis.  The collection consists of two volumes of a diary Coppedge kept while at City Hospital and later during her employment as an Army nurse from Indianapolis to New York to France by train and ship and her duties caring for the wounded.


COX, JULIA AND SUSANNAH. Papers, 1879–1908.  SC 2600.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Julia A. Cox (fl. 1879–1902), of Winchester, Indiana, was a weaver of rugs.  She had a sister named Susannah (fl. 1888–1895).  This collection consists of correspondence (1879–1908), most of which is in the form of postcards, received by Julia A. and Susannah Cox.  The majority of the postcards are requests to Julia for woven rugs.


CRONK, REBECCA. Papers, 1866–1886.  SC 2325.  3 folders.  Collection guide online.  This collection consists of letters written between 1866 and 1886 by Rebecca Cronk to former neighbors who had moved to California.  The letters contain details of family and local news from Carroll County, Indiana.


CURRY, JUNE RESNOVER. Collection, 1905–1921.  SC 2471, OM 0214.  1 box, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Cora Resnover Hampton (ca. 1890–1945) and Willa Resnover Donaldson (ca. 1894–1978) were daughters of James H. and Narcissus Stokes Resnover.  They were educated in the Indianapolis public schools and Teachers' College of Indianapolis (later known as the Blaker College of Education, Butler University).  Hampton taught in Indianapolis and Donaldson in Carbondale and Cairo, Illinois.  The collection contains materials relating to the professional achievements of the two sisters.


DAILEY, ANNIE BOGAN. Album, 1860–1882.  BV 0093.  1 bound volume.  Collection guide online.  Annie Bogan (fl. ca.1845–1885) spent her early life in Taylorsville, Indiana.  She was apparently married from there to Mr. Dailey, whose first name does not appear.  She spent part of her married life in southwestern Iowa, and seems to have left Iowa in 1882.  She had a son, Morris E. Dailey, and two brothers, William Bogan and S. G. Bogan.  The collection consists of a "friendship album" with inscriptions written between 1860 and 1882.  Several of the early inscriptions are from school friends; others are from Civil War soldiers, including her brother S. G. Bogan who joined the 91st Indiana Regiment in October 1862.  Finally there are entries from later friends in Iowa.


DARBY, ORANGE V. Papers, 1860–1918.  M 0079, BV 0998–1006.  3 boxes, 10 volumes.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-79.  Orange V. Darby (1853–1903) owned a dry goods store in Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana, and was involved with interurban railroad companies, serving as president of the Indiana Interurban Construction Company.  The collection contains personal and family correspondence.  There are letters from Darby's daughter, Anne Darby, later Mrs. Carl McCann, while a student at Wellesley in Massachusetts (1902–04) and while in Geneva, Switzerland (1909–10) as well as a series of letters from Elizabeth Vinnedge of Kokomo.


DAY, VINCENT H. Family Collection,  1834–1994.  M 0772, OM 396. 3 manuscript boxes, 3 bound volumes, 3 oversize folders, 1 box photographs, 4 folders color photographs, 2 folders oversize photographs, 1 videocassette, artifacts. Collection guide online.  Vincent H. Day was born in Kentucky on 4 January 1826.  His parents, Ambrose and Joanna Day, were farmers on land they purchased from the government when they moved to Fillmore (Putnam County), Indiana, in 1829.  Vincent Day first married Margaret Wilkinson and the union bore five children.  Margaret Day and her youngest child died of smallpox in 1865.  Following Margaret’s death, Vincent married Lucinda Frank (1842–1927) on 5 December 1866.  Their union bore two children, Frank and Ora Day.  The collection includes manuscripts, artifacts, printed material, and photographs generated by the Day family of Putnam County, Indiana. Lucinda (Frank) Day Dimler’s materials consist of legal documents from May 1886 to August 1912.  These records include a court document concerning Lucinda’s widow claim (against her children and stepchildren) to her recently deceased husband’s land.  Also within the series are nine black and white photographs of Lucinda Dimler’s family including herself, her brother Reverend Andrew Frank, her husband William Dimler and his family, and her son Frank with his wife Ida.  Other manuscript materials include a contract dated 20 April 1918 between Frank V. Day and his mother asking her to move off his land within thirty days of the arrangement. 


DELAPLANE, MARGARET LANDON. Scrapbooks, 1940–1965.  M 0318, OM 0174.  3 boxes, 1 folder.  No collection guide available.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-84.  Delaplane worked for the American Red Cross in Kokomo, Howard County, and in Indianapolis on war relief during World War II and disaster relief in the 1940s and 1950s.  The scrapbooks contain Delaplane's letters to her daughter written while on missions for the Red Cross, letters from Red Cross headquarters, thank-you notes from World War II soldiers, photographs, and newspaper clippings relating to her relief work.


DETHRIDGE, LUVENA W. Collection, 1927–1954.  M 0523, OMB 0056.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  Mary Luvena [Wallace Dethridge], a daughter of Luther and Laura Wallace, was born in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana.  Dethridge attended public schools in Richmond and studied with Samuel Garton, at one time chairman of the music department, Earlham College.  The collection, which includes correspondence, program booklets, a passport, newsletters, and a scrapbook, documents Dethridge's career as a lyric soprano.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


DE VANNIECK, MINNIE. Diary, 1901–1902.  SC2669.  Collection guide in library.  Minnie DeVannieck’s pocket diary, kept while she was living in Indianapolis, 1901–1902.  It includes activities; financial records; romantic writings; autographs; a biography of Lona Vestal Shaw of Shelby Township, Jefferson County, Indiana; and information on historic houses in the area.


DODGE, MARY ELIZABETH MAPES. Papers, 1867–1869.  SC 2359.  1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Mary Elizabeth Mapes Dodge, a prominent nineteenth-century author, corresponded with Robert Dale Owen, the eldest son of Robert Owen, social reformer and founder of New Harmony, Posey County, Indiana.  This collection contains fifteen letters written by Robert Dale Owen to Mary Elizabeth Mapes Dodge between 1867 and 1869.


DOUGLASS, BENJAMIN PENNEBAKER. Papers, 1809–1891.  SC 0110.  5 folders.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-89.  Benjamin Douglass (1820–1904), a teacher, merchant, attorney, and politician who made his home in Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana.  In 1855 he married Annie Pope (d. 1859), and in 1863 he married Victoria Boone.  This collection includes correspondence of Victoria Boone Douglass with family in Indiana and Kentucky, 1851–84.


DOWNEY, VIRTEA. Collection, 1913–1985.  M 0511, BV 2497–2498, OM 0333.  1 box, 2 volumes, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  This collection contains church histories, programs, newspapers, and newsletters collected by Virtea Maletta Washington Downey from various black Indianapolis churches and materials pertaining to black church women and women's groups.  Also included are obituaries of leading church members, memorabilia, and photocopies of photographs.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


DUNN, CAROLINE. Papers, 1887–1993.  M 0667, OM 0099.  3 boxes, 2 folders.  Collection guide online.  Caroline Dunn was born in Indianapolis, the daughter of Jacob Piatt Dunn and Charlotte Dunn.  She attended local schools, graduated from Butler University, and earned a library science degree from Columbia University.  For eight years she was the public librarian in Connersville, Fayette County, then returned to Indianapolis where she was a librarian at the State Library and the Indiana Historical Society.  The collection includes correspondence, club and church papers, historical notes, travel materials, and photographs.


DUNN, GERALDINE (GUTHRIE). Papers, 1954.  SC 1734.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  Typescript of author’s memories of attending School no. 50 and Washington High School in Indianapolis from 1912 to the early 1920s.


EANS, PAULINE B. Collection, 1926–1981.  M 0405.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  Pauline Eans, who taught nursing at Wishard Hospital School of Nursing (1955–77), was a founder of the Northwest Civic Association and a member of the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee.  The collection includes materials relating to Eans's professional career and community service.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


EDDY, OLIVE W. Papers, 1866.OM 0196. 1 folder.  No collection guide available.  Diploma received by Eddy upon graduation from Dearborn Female Seminary, 1866.


ELWELL, MARION. Letter, ca. 1863.  SC 2671.  1 item.  Collection guide in library.  The collection consists of a letter from Marion Elwell of the 7th Indiana Infantry Regiment to Mollie (Margaret) Fowler.  The letter discusses his relationship with her, and his longing to call upon her.


ENIX, ELIZABETH M. Papers, 1905–1994. M 0756.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  Elizabeth M. Enix was born Jane Elizabeth Martin in Indianapolis in 1906.  Her affiliations included  the National Council of Negro Women and the Women’s Improvement Club.  The collection includes correspondence, memoirs, programs, and photographs.  The memoirs discuss a number of topics, including Indianapolis buildings, the 1913 Indiana Flood, and the Indiana Avenue neighborhood.


FAIRBANKS, CHARLES WARREN. Papers, 1876–1928.  M 0100, BV 1150–1169, BV 2546–2553.  31 boxes, 28 volumes.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-102.  Charles Warren Fairbanks, attorney and politician (1852–1918), married Cornelia Cole in 1874.  Cornelia Cole Fairbanks died in 1913.  While this collection primarily relates to Fairbanks and his business and political ventures, it also includes materials of his wife, Cornelia, and daughter, Adelaide Fairbanks Timmons Causey.  It includes scrapbooks concerning the work of Cornelia Fairbanks as president-general of the Daughters of the American Revolution (1901–05) and a diary (1924–28) kept by Adelaide while in Vevay, Switzerland County, Indiana, and three notebooks (1916–22) with recipes, poetical essays, and reminiscences.


FAIRBANKS, ROBERT C. Papers, 1898–1918.M 0101. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  Robert C. Fairbanks (1887–1951) was a native of Indianapolis and youngest son of vice president Charles Warren Fairbanks.  The collection consists mainly of correspondence from Fairbanks's youth. Many of the letters are from his sister Adelaide.


FANGMEIER, JULIA STRAIN. Collection, 1933–1992.M 0637. 2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  This collection consists of correspondence, publications, genealogical information, programs, awards and certificates, newspaper clippings, and photographs relating to the life and activities of Julia Strain Fangmeier, an educator, minister, and political activist.


FEATHERSTONE, RAY. Collection, 1930–n.d.  M 0737.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  The collection includes a scrapbook created by Joann Buskirk, a student at Shortridge High School during the early 1930s.  The scrapbook contains clippings from sporting events, programs from theatrical events and school activities, and personal letters.  Photographs in the scrapbook include snapshots from vacations and images of Shortridge High School teachers and students.


FEIL, CATHERINE SCHULTE. Papers, 1861–1893.SC 2227.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  Feil was an immigrant who worked in an Indianapolis bakery.  The collection contains letters from Feil to her family in Germany describing everyday experiences and family matters.


FLANNER, HILDEGARDE. Letters, 1920–1977.M 0107. 1 box.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-110.  Flanner grew up in Indianapolis, attended the University of California at Berkeley (ca. 1920–23), married Frederick Monhoff (1926), and wrote a number of poetry books and plays.  The collection includes letters written by Flanner in Berkeley and New York (1920–23) and Altadena, California (1927, 1942), to Martha Hawkins, an Indianapolis friend; and letters written from California to Eleanor Goodall Vonnegut of Indianapolis (1961–76).  The letters concern school, California, her writings, and her family, including her sister, writer Janet Flanner (1892–1979).


FLETCHER, EMILY BEELER. Papers, 1825–1918.  M 0479, BV 2181–2203, BV 2330–2236, F 0182–0184.  1 box, 30 volumes, 3 microfilm reels.  Collection guide in library.  Emily Beeler Fletcher (1828–1910) was the wife of Indianapolis farmer and businessman Calvin Fletcher, Jr. During the Civil War she worked as a nurse in hospitals in Nashville and Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  She was one of the founders of the Home for Aged Women in Indianapolis (now the Indianapolis Retirement Home).  The collection contains Fletcher's diaries (1863–1901) and the diaries of her daughters Sarah Hill Fletcher Wagner (1863–89) and Emily Fletcher (1866–88).  Also included are travel diaries, poetry notebooks, and correspondence.


FORD, LEE (LEOLA) ELLEN. Papers, 1929–1985.M 0469. 89 boxes.  Collection guide online.  (Leola) Lee Ellen Ford (1917–1997) was a scientist, attorney, educator, and writer who taught at Anderson College, Pacific Lutheran University, Carson College, and Mississippi State College for Women, among others, primarily in the areas of biology and cytology (1950–70).  She was sponsor and principal mover for the Companion Collie Program for the Junior Blind (1955–65).  In 1969 she was director of the Institute for Basic Research in Mental Retardation, New York, and was executive assistant to Indiana Governor Otis Bowen from 1973 to 1975.  The collection contains materials relating to personal, professional, and governmental aspects of Ford's life.  It includes correspondence, diaries, biographical information, financial records, legal cases and law school materials, state government reports and memos, professional and literary publications, and photographs.


FORSYTH, WILLIAM. Papers, 1863–1985.  M 0691, OMB 0066.  38 boxes, 1 oversize box, and 29 boxes of visual materials.  Collection guide online.  William Forsyth (1854–1935) was an Indianapolis artist, teacher, and member of the Hoosier Group.  The collection contains correspondence, personal papers, and etchings, paintings, and sketches of William Forsyth, and correspondence and papers relating to Forsyth's family, including his wife Alice A. Forsyth, and daughters Constance and Dorothy Forsyth.


FOSTER, FANNIE. Papers, 1933.  SC 2713. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Fannie Foster was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on 26 February 1844. In 1867 she married David Foster. The Fosters made their home in Greenwood, Indiana, as farmers. From 1912 to 1937, John E. Boos of Albany, New York, collected documents and letters relating to personal experiences with Abraham Lincoln. Foster's papers include one letter and an additional document from 1933. In the letter dated 18 January 1933, Foster writes to John Boos about her encounters with Abraham Lincoln. She writes that she saw Lincoln in 1861 when he passed through Indianapolis on his way to Washington, D.C., for his inauguration. Foster also says that she heard Lincoln speak at the Old Bates Hotel, now the Capital Hotel. Foster continues saying that she saw Lincoln again in 1865 when he laid in state in Indianapolis. An undated document with a printed illustration of Lincoln chopping wood accompanies the letter.


FOX, O. JAMES. Collection, 1945-2002.P 0266. 5 boxes, 3 folders, color slides, negatives. Collection guide online.O. James Fox was born 2 October 1914 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He arrived in Indianapolis in 1945 as a volunteer with the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). Fox was assigned to photo-document the slum area on the near west side of the city and became a familiar figure in this community. The images in the collection include portraits of African American women and children in formal social situations and in the urban environment.


FRANKLIN, JOSIE E. RECORD BOOK, 1874–1896.SC 2372. 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Josie E. Franklin (b.1856), a daughter of a minister, resided in Henry County, Indiana.  The collection consists of a notebook (1874–96), with entries concerning a music course, a partial diary, and expenses (1895–96).


FRENCH, ALICE MOORE. Collection, 1892–1941.M 0458. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  Alice Moore French (1863–1934) was born in Johnson County, Indiana.  She attended Franklin College and the Boston School of Art and Design.  In 1887 she married Eli M. French.  She founded both the local (1917) and national (1918) divisions of the American War Mothers.  Moore also organized an International War Mothers.  The collection includes personal and organizational correspondence, genealogical information, and history of the War Mothers.


FRIBLEY, JANE S. Papers, 1975–1987.M 0546. 2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  Jane Fribley, a 1938 graduate of Indiana University, has been active in many organizations, especially in church and the women's movement.  She has served as the National Secretary and as State Legislative Citizen Action Chair for Church Women United, as President of the Indiana Council of Churches, as State Coordinator of the Religious Committee for the Equal Rights Amendment, and on the Indiana Civil Rights Commission.  This collection includes correspondence and other papers relating to Fribley's involvement with the Equal Rights Amendment and other women's issues.


FRIEDLEY, JAMES F. Diary, 1865–1893.BV 0573, F 0637. 1 volume, 1 microfilm reel.  No collection guide available.  The diary in this collection was originally kept (1865) by James F. Friedley, a teacher and clerk in a general store.  Friedley's niece, Frankie Cooperider, later recorded her experiences (1890–93) at Moores Hill College in the same diary.


GARR FAMILY PAPERS, 1849–1901.  SC 1884.  7 folders.  Collection guide in library.  Mary Diane Garr was the daughter of John Wesley Garr and Anna Clore.  The collection includes letters from Mary Diane Garr in Kentucky to her parents in Kokomo, Indiana, in 1862.  Garr was helping nurse her grandfather.


GARRETT, FOREST FLEMING.Collection, ca. 1898-ca. 1930.P 0285. 1 box.Collection guide online. Forest Fleming Garrett (1891-1949) was a teacher at North Ward School in Hartford City, Indiana, from ca. 1910 until her death. She was the widow of D. C. Garrett (1891-1914).  Her daughter, Delpa C. Garrett Hoist, was a student at North Ward School. The collection includes photographs of Garrett and Delpha C. Garrett Hoist with students, teachers, and members of a what appears to be a dramatic club.


GASS, JEANETTE CAROLINE. Diary, 1898–1899.BV 0574. 1 volume.  No collection guide available.  Jeanette Gass lived in Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, where her father owned a livery.  The diary records her daily activities, deaths in the area, and weather conditions.


GATES, NATALIE BRUSH. Papers, 1901–1935.M 0351. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  Natalie Lombard Brush (ca. 1895–1975) was the daughter of John Tomlinson Brush (1845–1912) and Elsie Lombard Brush.  She attended the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and attended Columbia University, the New York School for Social Research, and City College of New York.  In 1926 she married hotel owner A. Bennett Gates (1885–1956) of Dayton, Ohio, and in 1965 she married Rene de Gendron.  She was active in the Junior League of Indianapolis during the 1920s and became president of the national Junior League.  In 1967 Holt published her novel Hush Hush Johnson.  This collection contains five letters, a scrapbook of clippings and invitations, and photographs.  Two of the letters are from John T. Brush and three from Harry S. New.  The scrapbook reflects her career the local and national Junior League.


GIPE, MARTHA L. (BLACK). Papers, ca. 1929.  SC  0626.  1 item.  No collection guide available.  This collection is an account of the founding of the Hayseed Mission on East Washington Street in Indianapolis.  The building was never consecrated as a church, but served as an interdenominational venue for community activities, church services, and Sunday School classes.  Black discusses the founding of the mission, compares the contributions of the Methodists and the Presbyterians, and recalls games played by children during social hours.


GOENS, LILLIAN MARIE. Collection, 1884–1984.M 0447, OM 0134. 2 boxes, 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Lillian Marie Goens was born in Washington, Daviess County, Indiana, and lived in Indianapolis for sixty-five years.  She worked at Wishard Hospital and was active in Barnes United Methodist Church and United Methodist Women. In the early 1970s she was active in the Federation of Associated Clubs and the National Council of Negro Women.  This collection includes personal material as well as programs, minutes, and newsletters of organizations with which she was involved.


GOLDTHWAIT FAMILY. Collection, 1897–1938. P O 357. 2 albums, 1 color photograph, printed material, cellulose acetate negatives, 58 loose photographs, 9 cabinet cards. Collection guide in library.  Photographer Frances Benjamin Johnson (1864–1952) photographed officers and crew of the USS Olympia in August 1899. Harry Goldthwait (1874–1942) of Marion, Ind., was a shipwright on the Olympia. His portait is included in one album with other members of the Olympia’s crew. Frances Benjamin Johnson operated a photography studio in Washington, D.C. Her family’s social status gave her access to the families of Presidents Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Howard Taft.


GRABLE, JORAM AND LUCY ANN. Papers, 1852–1855.  SC 2409.  4 items.  Collection guide in library.  Lucy Ann Grable was the daughter of Thomas G. and Esther (Hester) Carson.  The collection contains four letters from Joram and Lucy Anne Grable to her parents.  The letters carry news of family sickness (including the death of a child), Joram's current employment, and of the family's financial situation.  In 1855 the family is "destitute," but they keep finding pieces of land, both in Cass and Tipton Counties, which they hope the Carsons will buy for them.


GRAY, BEULAH BRAZELTON. Papers, 1813–1962.M 0391, OM 0262.  11 boxes, 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-127.  Gray was a reporter and columnist for the Otwell (Pike County) Star (1920–45); editor of the Otwell Star (1929–45); housemother, student nurses' residence, Welborn Baptist Hospital, Evansville, Vanderburgh County (1945–50); and local historian, author of The Saga of Three Churches (1957) and other articles, books, and pageants in southern Indiana and Pike County.  The collection includes Gray's correspondence regarding her genealogical and local history research; correspondence with soldiers from Pike County serving in World War II; letters from Elsie Whitehurst Lightburn in Norwich, Cheshire, England, describing conditions in England during and after World War II (1945–49); family and personal correspondence; and essays, pageants, articles, and other writings.


GRAY, MARION H. Papers, 1850–1944.M 0118, BV 1367.  1 box, 1 volume.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-128.  Marion Hunter Gray (b.1899) grew up in Terre Haute, Indiana.  She married Henry C. Gray in 1921 and lived in Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana.  The collection consists of papers relating to Gray's family.  Included are letters of Selma Neubacher Steele, wife of artist T.C. Steele, to Mae Hunter Weinstein, Terre Haute, Vigo County, regarding personal matters and the work of her husband and the constitution and minutes of the First Congregational Church Sewing Circle, Terre Haute (1881–1912).


GRAY-LEONARD-NICHOLS FAMILY. Papers, ca. 1847–1953.  M 0707.  2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  The Gray, Leonard, and Nichols families of Indiana and Ohio were related by marriage.  Martha Gray and Harrison Nichols moved from Sandusky County, Ohio, to settle in Plymouth, Marshall County, Indiana, by 1852.  Their children included newspaperman and journalist William Merrick Nichols.  Much of the correspondence concerns Martha R. Gray Nichols and son William Merrick Nichols.  Family correspondence is to Martha and Harrison Nichols, from Martha to Harrison while he served in the Civil War, and between Martha and William while he worked in the newspaper trade in Indianapolis, New York City, and St. Louis.  Also included are letters from and newsclippings about Indiana state representative Daniel McDonald.


GRAYDON, JANE CHAMBERS MCKINNEY. Letters, 1863.SC 2222.  5 folders.  Collection guide in library.  Jane Chambers McKinney Graydon (1802–1891) was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the daughter of Mordecai and Mary [Chambers] McKinney.  In 1822 she married Alexander Graydon, an iron manufacturer with whom she had fourteen children.  Ardent abolitionists, their home was reputed to be a station of the underground railroad.  They moved to Indianapolis in 1843, joined Second Presbyterian Church, and taught Sunday school classes at an African American church.  Jane Graydon helped found the Indianapolis Orphans Asylum in 1851 and in company with Mrs. Calvin Fletcher, Jr., spent time during the Civil War nursing soldiers in Tennessee.  She was instrumental in setting up the Home for Aged Women (now the Indianapolis Retirement Home).  The collection contains memoirs, photographs, and correspondence, mainly dating from 1863, written by Graydon to her husband and daughters from a Union Army hospital in Nashville.  The collection provides an account of work activities of women in the hospital during the Civil War.


GREATHOUSE, RUTH. Collection, 1912–1936.M 0622. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  Ruth Greathouse, a daughter of Archie and Rose Greathouse, was born in Indianapolis. This collection primarily includes correspondence from W. E. Mayo.


GREEN, EMMA CASON. Collection, 1939–1983.M 0536. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Green was a self-employed dressmaker in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana. This collection, part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project, includes materials relating to the life of Green.


GREEN, MIRIAM WILSON. Papers, 1859–1897.M 0119, F 0573–0574. 2 boxes, 2 microfilm reel.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-129.  Green attended Earlham College, Richmond, Wayne County (1861–62); taught school in a number of counties in eastern Indiana; married John Henley of Newport (Fountain City), Wayne County (1873); and was a member of the Society of Friends. The collection consists of letters to Green from relatives, friends, and suitors in eastern and central Indiana during the period 1859–72, relating to school, teaching, the Civil War, the response of Quakers to the war, and family matters.


GREER, REV. HESTER ANNA. Papers, 1880–1982.M 0454. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Hester Anna Nolcox Greer, the daughter of John Western and Isabell Patterson Nolcox, was born and reared in Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana. In 1898 she married Jesse Greer, a minister. Also a minister, Hester Greer served congregations in Princeton, Indianapolis, and Fort Wayne and did missionary work in Jamaica and Cuba. This collection, part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project, includes materials relating to Greer's career.


GUNDERSON, LEAH B. Papers, 1964–1987.SC 2314. 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Leah Gunderson received a B.S. degree in 1957 from Valparaiso University in Physical Education, Health, and Recreation. She earned graduate degrees from Indiana University in Parks and Recreation (1964) and School Administration (1986). She taught, mainly courses in physical education, in Merrillville and Lowell in Lake County and Plymouth and Culver in Marshall County. This collection consists of biographical material, three letters of appreciation, and a scrapbook of the Plymouth, Indiana, senior citizens group (1964–65), where Mrs. Gunderson served as recreational director.


HACK, ELIZABETH JANE MILLER. Papers, 1875–1941.M 0123, BV 1369–1371, OM 0161. 4 boxes, 3 volumes, 2 folders. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-134.  Elizabeth Jane Miller Hack, author of The Yoke (1903), Saul of Tarsus (1906), and other novels written under her maiden name (Miller), was the wife of Indianapolis attorney Oren Hack. The collection consists primarily of documents and letters of Hack and her family in Indianapolis from the period 1894 to 1920 and includes correspondence about her writing and family matters and diaries (1894–1903).


HAERLE, ELISABETH. Papers, 1921–1929.SC 2425. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Elisabeth Haerle was the daughter of Indianapolis merchant George C. Haerle and Norma Hollweg. Hildegarde Flanner (1899–1927), poet and playwright, was born and educated in Indianapolis. The collection includes a book review, snapshot, copies of poems, and correspondence relating to Flanner.


HALL, MILDRED. Papers, 1916–2001.M 0796. 1 document case, 11 flat file folders of photographs, 6 folders photographs, 1 oversized photograph. . Collection guide online.  Mildred Marshall Hall, daughter of William Henry and Nettie Belle Marshall, was born on 18 April 1911 on the outskirts of Indianapolis. Like her father, she attended Indianapolis Public School #43 and then continued on to Shortridge High School. When Crispus Attucks High School was built for African American students, she was one of many students mandated to go. Hall attended Butler University and graduated in 1948. She married Luther E. Hall, Jr. in 1941. Mildred Hall taught in the Indianapolis Public School system for 32 years, retiring in 1970. She spent 30 years at IPS #26 and 2 years at School #32. The collection pertains to Mildred Hall and her work with the Red Cross Motor Corps, her career as a public school teacher, and her membership in the Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Mildred Hall was a member of the Red Cross Motor Corps during World War II. There are several pictures of Hall and her husband, Luther (a World War II veteran), in their uniforms. Hall also had an extensive career as a teacher with the Indianapolis Public Schools. Many of the materials in the collection pertain to School #26. The collection also contains two histories of Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church published in 1916 and 1944, as well as three booklets commemorating the church's 85th, 125th, and 135th anniversaries in 1951, 1991, and 2001 respectively. Additionally, there is information about the Flora Grant Women's Missionary Society.


HALSEY, JAMES SYLVANUS. Diaries, 1859–1898.SC 1723. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  James Halsey resided in Clarksburg, Decatur County, Indiana. This collection includes a diary of Mary Halsey, 1897–98. There are daily entries regarding weather, her activities, and local events.


HANGER, MARY ELIZABETH. Diary, 1916–1922.SC 2363. 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Mary Elizabeth Hanger received a law degree from John Marshall Law School in Chicago in 1927. This collection includes the original and printed versions of Mary Elizabeth Hanger's diary for 1916–22.


HARDEN, CECIL. Papers, 1938–1984.M 0584, OMB 0043, CT 0771–0772. 31 boxes, 2 cassette tapes. Collection guide online.  Cecil Harden (1894–1984), a native of Covington, Fountain County, Indiana, attended Indiana University and taught in the Covington school system. In 1914 she married Frost R. Harden, owner of a local Ford dealership. They had one son, Murray, later a physician in West Lafayette. Active in local clubs and church organizations, Harden began her political career in 1932 when she was elected Republican Precinct Committeewoman. After holding several district and state positions within the Indiana Republican party, Harden was elected to the United States House of Representatives from the Sixth District (western Indiana) in 1948. She served five terms and became (in 1951) the first woman member of a House Committee to make an official trip around the world. The collection, spanning the years 1938 to the 1970s, consists largely of Harden's personal and political correspondence, speeches and news releases, political and personal expense accounts, appointment books and calendars, and news clippings.


HARDIN FAMILY. Papers, 1866, 1896.SC 2466. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The Hardin family lived near Pleasantville in Sullivan County, Indiana. The collection consists of two letters written by female members of the family. Both letters relate to deaths in the family.


HARDY, JONATHAN H. Memoirs of Elizabeth Hardy of Lexington, Scott County, Indiana, 1880.SC 2111, F 0217. 1 folder, 1 microfilm reel. No collection guide available.  Elizabeth Hardy was born in Massachusetts and lived in various parts of New England. In 1814 she moved to Lexington, Scott County, Indiana, with her husband. At an early age she experienced a Free Will Baptist conversion and remained very religious throughout her life. In 1832 she and her husband became Campbellites; after his death in 1836 she became a Millerite. The collection includes a photocopy of the published biography of Elizabeth Hardy written by her son.


HARRAH, ALMIRA MARIA SCOTT. Papers, 1819–1903.  M 0131, BV 1021–1023. 2 boxes, 3 volumes. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-144.  Harrah was a teacher in Manhattan, Putnam County (1840); lived with her parents in Cloverland, Clay County (1840–43); married Samuel B. Harrah; taught school at Greencastle, Putnam County (1847); and was active in benevolent, temperance, and women's rights organizations. The collection includes correspondence between Harrah and her husband while she was teaching school in Greencastle; speeches and essays on temperance, women's rights, and humanitarianism; and scrapbooks kept by Harrah's daughter and by Harvey Scott.


HARRISON, BENJAMIN. Collection, 1853–1943.M 0132, OM 0325. 2 boxes, 1 folder. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-145.  This collection represents a variety of materials, mainly correspondence to, from, and among Harrison family members and legal documents from Benjamin Harrison's professional career. Of the six series in this collection, series one relates to Benjamin Harrison, the twenty-third president of the United States, series six relates to John Witherspoon Scott, brother of Caroline Scott Harrison, and series two through five relate to women in the Harrison family. Series II (1853–92), includes personal correspondence and memorabilia relating to Caroline Scott Harrison, first wife of Benjamin Harrison. Series III (1891–1943) includes personal correspondence relating to Mary Lord Harrison, second wife of Benjamin Harrison and niece of Caroline Scott Harrison. Series IV (1889–1909) includes personal correspondence of Mary Harrison McKee, daughter of Benjamin and Caroline Harrison. Series V (1890–92) includes correspondence of Mary [May/Mame] Saunders Harrison, wife of Russell Harrison, son of Benjamin and Caroline Harrison.


HARRISON, NANCY ELSTON. Papers, 1947.SC 1477. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Nancy Elston Harrison (d. ca. 1959) was married to Nicholas McCarty Harrison, great-grandson of William Henry Harrison. This collection contains a letter invitation from the mayor of Indianapolis, Robert H. Tyndall, to Mrs. Harrison to be in the reviewing stand for the parade commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the city of Indianapolis.


HARRISON, RUSSELL B. Collection, 1880–1908.M 0387. 1 box. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-146.  While this collection pertains mainly to Russell B. Harrison's varied business dealings and various brushes with the press there are personal and family letters and photographs. Harrison was the son of Benjamin Harrison, twenty-third president of the United States. Among the personal and family correspondence are letters from Marthena Harrison (a daughter), May [Mary S.] Harrison (wife), and Emma Jones.


HARRISON, WILLIAM HENRY. Papers and documents, 1791–1864.M 0364, OM 0034. 2 boxes, 4 folders. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-147.  Anna Symmes Harrison (1775–1864) was born in Flatbrook, Sussex County, New York, the daughter of John Cleves Symmes and Anna (Tuthill/Tuttle) Symmes. She married William Henry Harrison in 1795 and died in 1864 in her son's home. This collection includes a number of letters to and from Anna Harrison (1802, 1835, 1845–55), most of which relate to family issues.


HARTMAN, ANNABEL. Papers, 1981–1990.  M 0793, OM 0404.1 document case, 1 photograph, 2 oversize folders. Collection guide online. AnnabelHartmanwas raised in Illinos and came to Indiana in the 1950s following her marriage to Grover L. Harman. Annabel Hartman and Jacquie Reed were Indianapolis coordinators for the Ribbon Project, an effort by peace groups, churches and other organizations around the world to recognize the need for world peace. The Ribbon was a series of cloth, quilt, or applique pieces made by individuals or groups. The pieces were tied together to form a single, long unit. The Ribbon was draped around the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. on 4 August 1985. The collection contains correspondence, newsletters, clippings, and contact lists associated with the Ribbon Project. The material reflects Indiana residents’ participation in the project, the conception and organization of the event by Justine Merritt and others, and the impact of the project after the 4 August event. Material associated with the national event includes newsletters originating in Denver, Colorado, posters, and instructions concerning how to construct a peace ribbon.


HARVEY, CAROLINE McMATH GOODWIN. Papers, 1940–1987.SC 2509. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Caroline Harvey (ca. 1901–1975) was born in Indianapolis. She graduated from Indiana University in 1921 and earned an MD degree in 1923. Her first husband, John K. Goodwin, was president of the Indiana Veneer and Lumber Company, and her second husband was Thomas P. Harvey. The collection contains a club paper written by Harvey about Edith Mahone Arnold (1901–1987), born in Talbot County, Georgia, longtime resident of Indianapolis, and a member of Mount Paran Baptist Church. The paper is entitled "The Florence Nightingale of 28th Street."


HASSELMAN, OTTO H. Papers, 1864–1905.M 0135, BV 1024–1025, OM 0264. 1 box, 2 volumes, 1 folder. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-148.  Hasselman was an Indianapolis journalist and politician. This collection includes diaries (1879–80, 1891–98) of Hasselman's wife, Olive Eddy Hasselman, and of her mother, Anna Eddy, of Evanston, Illinois (1897, 1900).


HATFIELD, BARBARA. Letter, 1848.SC 0709. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  This collection is a letter from Barbara Hatfield, Granville Post Office, Delaware County, Indiana (3 August 1848) to William H. Ball, Portsmouth, Ohio, a brother or brother-in-law. The writer urges the Balls to come to Delaware County, where the climate is healthy. Prices of various farm products are given.


HAWORTH, PAUL LELAND. Family papers, 1829–1957.M 0338, OM 0175, BV 3450-BV 3453.17 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize box, 10 oversize folders, 4 bound volumes, artifacts, 1 box photographs, 2 boxes of lantern slides. Collection guide online.  Paul Leland Haworthwas the son of John D. Haworth and Fanny (Horner) Haworth of West Newton, Indiana. He married Martha Ackerman, an art teacher, in 1903 and the union bore three children: Leland John, Anna Ruth, and Martha Rosalie. Haworth, a historian, editor and adventurer, was head of the history department at Butler University (Indianapolis) at the time of his death. The collection includes correspondence, diaries, genealogies, legal documents, financial records, maps, and photographs generated by the Haworth family of West Newton, Indiana. Included arediaries written by Fanny Horner Haworth, correspondence between Paul L. Haworth and his parents, and letters from Anna Ruth and Leon Wallace to Martha Ackerman Haworth. Other items include Rosa Haworth'spersonal papers. Visual materials includes two watercolor paintings and children's art work.  Lantern slides made in British Columbia, Canada, include images of Native Canadian women and children.


HAYDEN, JOHN JAMES. Papers, 1819–1899.M 0136. 5 boxes. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-150.  The collection includes the writings of Sarah Marshall Hayden (d. 1899), author of several novels, among them Early Engagements (1854).


HEALEY FAMILY. Papers, 1904–1974.  SC 2495.  1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  This collection contains material relating to the Healey family, living mainly in Rensselaer, Jasper County, Indiana. The items include transcripts of Julia Ann Howland Healey's account of first coming to Rensselaer in 1865.


HEDDENS, LAURA. Papers, 1882–1884.SC 0726. 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  This collection includes a Logansport High School commencement program for 23 June 1882, an essay "The Effect of the Progressive Age" for the commencement, and a teacher's license for Fulton County (31 May 1884).


HELLEKSON, RUTH. Papers, 1903–1969.SC 0729, BV 0575–0576. 1 folder, 2 volumes.  Collection guide in library.  The collection contains a scrapbook (1903–18) kept by Hellekson while a child and student in Indianapolis and Massachusetts and while a nurse during World War I.


HENNIGAR, MAYME. Papers, 1930–1936.SC 2355. 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Mayme Hennigar, a resident of Indianapolis, was at one time a cashier at Harry Levinson's hat store on East Market Street. This collection includes a mortgage and deed for property in Indianapolis.


HERBAUGH FAMILY. Collection, ca. 1880-ca. 1965.P 0283. 3 boxes.Collection guide online. The collection contains photographs associated with the Herbaugh, Seelig, Knox, Ford, and Hollis families of Blackford County, Indiana. Included are images of Della Herbaugh Seelig and her daughters (Catharine and Jessie), Mabel Seelig, Reba Knox Young, and a number of other women from Blackford County and its environs. Also included is a photograph of women telephone operators at work in Hartford City, Indiana.


HERON, ALEXANDER. Papers, 1845–1943.M 0141, BV 1382–1387. 8 boxes, 6 volumes.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-157.  Heron (1827–1900) was a farmer in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana, and secretary of the State Board of Agriculture (1872–91). This collection includes diaries (1875–1912), correspondence, and business papers (1890s–1912) of Caroline Peck, Heron's sister-in-law.


HERRICK, MYRA B. Diary, 1909.SC 0743. 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  A diary kept by Herrick in Lisbon, Noble County, Indiana, as a student and of travels abroad in England.


HIGGINS, HELEN BOYD. Scrapbook, ca. 1935.OM 0295. l folder. Collection guide online.  Helen Boyd Higgins (1892–1971), born in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana, was the daughter of Linnaeus T. Boyd. She was educated at Knickerbacker Hall in Indianapolis and Abbot Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. In 1920 she married William R. Higgins, an attorney. Boyd authored five biographies for the Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1942–61, in their "Childhood of Famous Americans" series. This collection consists of pages from a scrapbook (ca.1930s) containing clippings about public education in Indianapolis.


HILL, OPAL MAY. Papers, 1918–1938.SC 2247. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  This collection contains papers relating to the Fulton, Franklin, and Hill families of Marion, Anderson, and Indianapolis.


HOAGLAND, MERICA EVANS. Letter, 1906 Sept. 8, Indianapolis, Ind. [to] My Dear Mr. Smith. SC 2612. 1 item. Collection guide in library.  A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Hoagland attended Vassar College. In 1902 she took a position on the Indiana Library Commission and moved to Indianapolis. She aided in the establishment of the Indiana Library School, was active in local and national women's organizations, and wrote a column on Indiana history for the Indianapolis News. Letter from Hoagland regarding the appointment of the State Librarian by the Indiana State Board of Education. She recommends Demarchus Clariton Brown, a professor at Butler University who won the appointment; Jacob Piatt Dunn, Jr., a former State Librarian and historian; and Harlow Lindley, a historian and librarian.


HODGES, REBECCA TRAILL. Paper, 1963.SC 0762. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Rebecca Traill [Andrews] Hodges (1881–1973) was the daughter of R. T. Andrews. A native of Massachusetts, she moved to Indianapolis in 1902 to teach. She married Dr. Fletcher H. Hodges, who died in 1964. Rebecca Hodges was active in various social clubs in Indianapolis, including the Propylaeum Club and the Indiana Society, National Society of Colonial Dames of America. Sallie E. [Downing] Coleman (ca. 1860–1947) was the daughter of Col. Michael A. Downing and wife of first, John H. Vajen, Jr., and second William Henry Coleman. She was an active volunteer for the American Red Cross and the Indianapolis Flower Mission. The collection contains "The Propylaeum Story," a paper written by Hodges and read at a meeting of the Propylaeum Club (spring 1963).


HODGES, REBECCA TRAILL. Poem, 1939.SC 2598. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Rebecca Traill [Andrews] Hodges (1881–1973) was the daughter of R. T. Andrews. A native of Massachusetts, she moved to Indianapolis in 1902 to teach. She married Dr. Fletcher H. Hodges, who died in 1964. Rebecca Hodges was active in various social clubs in Indianapolis, including the Propylaeum Club and the Indiana Society, National Society of Colonial Dames of America. Sallie E. [Downing] Coleman (ca. 1860–1947) was the daughter of Col. Michael A. Downing and wife of first, John H. Vajen, Jr., and second William Henry Coleman. She was an active volunteer for the American Red Cross and the Indianapolis Flower Mission. This collection consists of a poem by Hodges entitled, "My Day, Twenty Four Hours in the Private Life of Sally D. Coleman, by Sally D. Coleman." It was read at a birthday dinner at the Indianapolis Propylaeum, 13 January 1939, in honor of Mrs. Coleman.


HOLLIDAY, FLORENCE BAKER. Diaries, 1909–1942. M 0703. 2 boxes. Collection guide online.  A native and resident of Indianapolis, Holliday (1871–1947) was the daughter of Indiana governor Conrad Baker. She married businessman Jaquelin S. Holliday. Holliday was a clubwoman and philanthropist, and an active anti-prohibitionist. The collection contains fifteen diaries kept by Holliday, 1909 and 1930–1942, documenting her daily activities. Topics include club meetings, visitors, people she dined with, books she read, and trips with her husband. Entries note attending a Booth Tarkington play; visiting President Herbert Hoover; dinner with Meredith Nicholson; and her anti-Prohibition activities with the local chapter of the Women's Organization for National Prohibition Reform. There is also a 1941 diary of unknown authorship.


HOLLIDAY, MARGARET YANDES. Collection, 1883–1920, 1982.M 0372. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-162.  Margaret Holliday (1844–1920), known as Grettie, was born in Indianapolis, the daughter of a prominent Presbyterian minister, William A. Holliday, and sister of John H. Holliday, founder of the Indianapolis News. She was, for thirty-seven years, a missionary to Tabriz, Persia [Iran], sponsored by the First Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis (1883–1920). The collection consists of Holliday's letters from Tabriz to her family in Indianapolis and from her trips through Europe and Russia (1883), Turkey and Constantinople (1889), and the Middle East and Egypt (1906) and her letters and annual reports to the Women's Missionary Society, which oversaw her work.


HOLLIDAY, MARY EARLY. Papers, 1917–1918.SC 2596. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Mary Early Holliday, of Indianapolis, was a volunteer with the YMCA Canteen Service in France during World War I. The collection consists of a typescript of Holliday's experiences in France during World War I. She describes conditions in camps, her duties with the "Y," friends and acquaintances she made, and her experiences near the front lines with the 42nd Division.


HOLLINGSWORTH, HELEN. Paper, ca. 1973.SC 2663. 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Helen Hollingsworth (b. ca. 1890) was born on her family's farm near Lebanon, Indiana, to Frank and Myme Hollingsworth. Financial conditions forced her parents to leave the family farm and move to North Indianapolis in 1898. The collection consists of a twelve-page paper presented to the Portfolio Club of Indianapolis in 1973 in which she recounts the last days of the nineteenth century and relates how she and her family welcomed in the new century.


HOLLOWAY, EMMA G. Papers, 1883–1919.M 0144, OM 0159. 1 box, 1 folder.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-163.  Holloway was a physician in North Manchester, Wabash County, Indiana (ca.1930–35) and served on the medical staff of the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, Fort Wayne, Allen County (1930–35). The collection includes material relating to the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the WCTU's national meeting in 1921; Holloway's notes and writings on medical matters; and her notes regarding psychological testing and physical examination of patients at the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth.


HOPEWELL, M. R. Scrapbook, ca. 1870.BV 2490. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of a scrapbook that was used for several purposes. It was first used as an order book for Orville J. Victor's The Civil, Political, and Military History of the Southern Rebellion and next as an attendance book for schoolchildren. It was also used as a copybook for German script and to paste in clippings mainly concerned with women and love. The name M. R. Hopewell appears in several sections of the scrapbook.


HOPKINS, MARTHA ELLIS. Papers, 1914–1952.M 0146, BV 1446–53. 6 boxes, 8 volumes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-167.  Martha Crowel Alice Ellis Hopkins (1870–1959) was a teacher and wife of Arthur H. Hopkins. Hopkins was a Republican party precinct vice-committeewoman in Rensselaer, Jasper County (1920–52) and a Republican party vice-chairman, Indiana 10th Congressional District (1922–32). The collection includes correspondence regarding Republican party activities, Jasper County voting records and poll books (1922–52), and Republican party campaign materials.


HOSKINS, PHOEBE. Diary, 1859. SC 0204. 1 folder. 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  A native of North Carolina, Phoebe P. Mendenhall married Moses S. Hoskins. The Hoskins were Quaker abolitionists whose property was confiscated because of their anti-slavery beliefs. They left North Carolina on April 29, 1859, apparently with a group, and arrived at Phoebe's sister's home in Westfield, Hamilton County, Indiana, on May 24. The collection consists of a typescript copy of the trip diary kept by Hoskins during her family's move from North Carolina to Indiana in 1859. The diary details the path they took, Phoebe's impression of the land, and daily activities.


HOTTLE, LYDIA. Letter, 1877. SC 2537.1 item. Collection guide in library.  A photocopy of an 1877 letter from Mary E. Hausenfluck in Shenandoah County, Virginia, to her daughter Lydia Hottle in Corydon, Indiana. Topics include family news and money sent to Lydia.


HOTZ, JOSEPH. Civil War Letters, 1861-1865.  M 0710, F 0079.  1 box, 1 reel of microfilm.  Collection guide online.  The collection includes letters written in German by Joseph Hotz to his wife, Maria, while he served with the 50th Indiana Regiment (November 1861–February 1865).  Hotz writes of his loneliness and is often disappointed with his wife's lack of comfort and support.  He also inquires about friends and family at home, the health of his daughter, and gives financial instructions regarding the running of the family farm.  Also included are translations of three letters to Mrs. Hotz from Corporal V. Wicker of the 50th Indiana, Company E, in Mobile, Alabama.  Wicker discusses Hotz's death and his financial accounts with soldiers in the company.


HOWLAND, POWELL.  PAPERS, 1815–2000 (bulk 1815-1917).  M 0149. 7 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize box, 3 folders of photographs, 1 folder of negatives. Collection guide online.  Powell Howland (1799–1878) was born in Saratoga, New York, but moved to northeast Marion County, Indiana, in October 1838, where he purchased a 160-acre farm from Benjamin Johnson.  Howland married Mahala Thurber in 1823 and the union produced nine children. The collection consists of Powell Howland’s personal and business papers and includes letters from Howland’s granddaughter, Mary E. Lowe, in Marshfield, Missouri, concerning the financing of a land purchase in 1872 and school papers of Maggie Howland.


HUNT, ESTHER Papers, ca. 1927–1951.SC 1236, OM 0379. 4 folders, 1 oversize folder, and 1 folder of visual materials. Collection guide online.  Virginia Esther Toole (1896–1956) was born in Sherman, Illinois, and moved as a child to Sullivan, Indiana. She married Malcolm Hunt and lived in Montana and Minnesota before moving to Indianapolis in 1930. Hunt worked at L.S. Ayres and Company department store until she and her husband moved to Florida in 1952. The collection contains papers relating to Esther Hunt, primarily documenting her employment at L.S. Ayres and Company. It includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, photographs, three issues of Ayrograms, the L.S. Ayres newsletter, and ephemera relating to World War II.


HUTCHINGS-KOEHLER FAMILY. Papers, 1699–1916.M 0152, BV 1456, F 0718–0719. 5 boxes, 1 volume, 2 microfilm reels. Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-175.  This collection includes correspondence and papers documenting the history of the Hutchings and Koehler families from their origins in Wurttemberg, Germany, through immigration to Maryland and subsequent dispersal throughout the country in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Among the materials in the collection are papers relating to sisters Aurora (1846–1928) and Septima (1848–1918) Koehler, who taught at Indian mission schools in South Dakota. There are manuscript poems of Matilda [Koehler] Hutchings (1840–1914) and Josephine Hutchings (1863–1930) and poems and essays of Aurora and Septima Koehler.


INGERSOLL, L. DUNHAM. Papers, 1878, n.d.SC 2423. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Sue Ingersoll married George McWilliams and lived in Covington, Fountain County, Indiana. The collection includes two letters written to McWilliams from her brother L. Dunham Ingersoll and an undated handmade Valentine addressed to Miss Mamie McWilliams, Covington, Indiana.


INGRAM, MARY BETH. Papers, 1990–1991.SC 2420. 9 folders. Collection guide online.  Terry and Mary Beth Ingram lived in Indianapolis during the Desert Storm Campaign in Kuwait and Iraq and wrote letters to soldiers serving in the campaign. The correspondence in this collection is primarily that of Mrs. Ingram and provides a picture of life both at the campaign front and at home.


JAMES, ALICE. Letter, 1913.SC 0868. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The David James family moved to Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana, probably from Wabash County about 1913 because of the university. They bought a farm on the outskirts of Bloomington, but moved into town for a few years so they could keep boarders while their children were in school. The letter, 11 March 1913, written by Alice James in Bloomington to cousin Susan [Stout Darrah?], includes family news and information on Glenn James, a professor of mathematics at Purdue University.


JAMESON, MARGARET BOOTH. Papers, n.d.SC 1910. 2 folders. No collection guide available.  The collection contains histories and reminiscences of the Indianapolis Woman's Club, the Propylaeum, and the Edwin Harlan, Patrick Jameson, and Bebee Booth families.


JETT, ALTA M. Collection, 1916–1986.M 0495, BV 2686. 3 boxes, 1 volume. Collection guide online.  This collection contains materials from Alta M. Boatwright Jett's personal life, newspaper clippings, bulletins from Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, area churches, and records from two Richmond nursing homes. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


JOHNSON, EDITH CONNELL. Papers, ca. 1930–1950.SC 2292. 3 folders. Collection guide in library.  Material in this collection, including group photographs of some of her classes, relates to Johnson's career as a teacher in Indianapolis.


JOHNSON, FRED M. Collection, 1865-1945.  P 0306. 9 folders.Collection guide online. The collection includes photographs of two young women, ca. 1920s. The women are believed to be Catherine Johnson Goodin and Phila R. Johnson, daughters of Fred M. Johnson and Phila Parks Johson. One portrait depicts a woman in a “flapper” style dress.


JOHNSTON, GEORGE and WILLIAM. Papers, 1862–1916. M 0518, BV 2512. 1 box, 1 volume. Collection guide online.  The collection contains correspondence and papers relating to the Civil War, Grand Army of the Republic activities, and the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Indianapolis. Included in this collection is a diary of Sarah Alice Holmes.


JONES, MARY. Papers, 1844, 1848.SC 2502. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Mary Jones lived in Newport, Vermillion County, Indiana, during the 1840s. The Judah family lived in Vincennes, Knox County, Indiana. This collection contains two letters to Mary Jones from Caroline Judah (1844) thanking Jones for her hospitality and describing a barn raising; and one from Catharine Judah (1848), which describes local events.


JUDAH-BRANDON FAMILY. Papers, 1820–1950.M 0171, OM 0205. 9 boxes, 2 folders. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-210.  This collection consists primarily of family correspondence, love letters of John Mantle Judah (1848–1936) to Mary Jameson (1851–1930), correspondence between Judah and his wife while on business trips, and their correspondence with family members from the period 1863–1924. Manuscripts of Mary Jameson Judah's stories and essays and correspondence regarding the publication of her book Down Our Way (1897) are also contained in the collection.


KASER, MARY ETTA RODOCKER. Letters, 1917–1918. SC 0894. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The collection contains letters of Mary Etta Kaser of Indianapolis to her daughter, Merl (Mrs. Arthur J. Young), of Flat Rock, Shelby County, Indiana. They reflect financial difficulties of a widow in failing health, who lived in an apartment and had income from rental property.


KEEVER, WINIFRED. Family papers, ca. 1830–1981. M 0729, OM 0386.5 boxes, 2 oversize folders. Collection guide in library.  Winifred (Currier) Keever, wife of Frank Keever, was a resident of Indianapolis and collector of family papers. The collection consists of material relating to the Bloom, Jones, Currier, and Keever family, members of which lived in various states, including Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and California. It includes correspondence, diaries, real estate deeds, receipts, genealogical records, military records, and financial records. The collection is arranged by family branch and then by type of material.


KELLEY, ELIZABETH H. Collection, 1942–1984.SC 2487. 3 folders. Collection guide online.  Elizabeth H. Rile Kelley was born in Union County, Indiana. Kelley and her husband, Harold B., were co-owners with Henry and Mary Ina Bass of the Specialty Record Shop, Inc., in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana. In addition to writing numerous articles, Kelley organized in 1943 the Readers Expression Guild, a local club for study, self-improvement, and self-expression for black women. The collection contains materials relating to Kelley, the Readers Expression Guild, and Richmond history.


KETCHAM, JOHN LEWIS. Papers, 1830–1937. M 0173, BV 1035–1046. 3 boxes, 12 volumes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-216.  The papers consist primarily of family correspondence, principally from the period 1830–69. Of special interest is correspondence (1834–61) of Catharine Merrill (1824–1900) and Ketcham's correspondence with his wife Jane Merrill Ketcham (1819–1911) while she was working as an army nurse in Gallatin, Tennessee, during the Civil War. The collection also includes reminiscences of Jane Merrill Ketcham.


KILLIN, ELIZABETH MADDOX. Papers, 1841–1883.SC 0909. 11 folders.  Collection guide in library.  The Killin family lived in Fountain County, Indiana, from 1839 to the 1850s and then in Benton County from the 1850s to the 1880s. The collection includes a diary and reminiscences of Killin (1841–83), and several family letters from the 1850s to the 1870s.


KOCHEN, BESSIE. Passport, 1911.SC 2460. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Bessie Kochen, born Bosna Cheina Batchinskaya, came from Russia to the United States in the spring of 1911. The collection contains Kochen's 1911 Russian passport.


LAFUSE, AGGIE A. Papers, 1853–1870.SC 0948. 5 folders.  Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-227. Aggie Lafuse was a resident of Liberty, Union County, Indiana. The diaries describe everyday life and mention numerous domestic and farming activities typical of the period.


LANGSTON, DILLA. Memoirs, 1924.  SC 0989.  2 folders.  No collection guide available.  This collection is a paper written by Dilla Langston of a trip, 28 August through 2 September 1924, taken by ten women by bus from New Castle, Henry County, Indiana, to Chicago and by boat to Milwaukee, and their return.


LATTIMORE, MARTHA. Collection, 1880–1907.SC 2489. 2 folders. Collection guide online. Martha Mace Lattimore was a resident of Noblesville, Hamilton County, Indiana. The collection, which pertains to family issues and mentions contemporary race relations, includes correspondence, a mortgage form, and a photograph.


LAUGHLIN, CLARA E. Letters, 1898–1903.SC 1777. 3 folders.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-233.  Clara Elizabeth Laughlin (1873–1941), a Chicago author and editor, was a friend of James Whitcomb Riley and of Riley's sister Mary Elizabeth Riley Payne (1864–1936) of Indianapolis. This collection contains twenty-two letters from Clara Laughlin in Chicago to Mary Elizabeth Payne in Indianapolis. They deal with Laughlin's travels, visits with Riley and other mutual friends, clothing styles, and current affairs.


LEONARD, EVALINA M. Letters, 1815, 1818.SC 2562. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Evalina (Evelyn) Marie Leonard (d. 1833) was born in Middleboro, Massachusetts, the daughter of David Augustus and Mary [Pierce] Leonard. By 1818 the family had moved to Indiana, living in Harrison County, first in Northampton and then in Corydon. It was in Corydon that Leonard met and married (1821) John Hay Farnham (1791–1833). The two letters in this collection were written in 1815 and 1818 by Leonard to her cousin Louisa Bourne in Massachusetts. The 1815 letter was written from Bristol (Rhode Island?), and describes a summer day. The 1818 letter was written from Northampton and describes the "wild state" of the country.


LEWIS, SAMUEL B. Papers, 1860–1930.M 0331, BV 1856–1859. 1 box, 4 volumes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-235.  Lewis (1840–1920) was a physician in Manville and Canaan, Jefferson County, Indiana. This collection includes applications to the Daughters of the American Revolution for his wife and daughter and bylaws and yearbooks of the Madison, Jefferson County, chapter of the D.A.R. (1911–23).


LIEBER, CHARLOTTE. Diary, 1960–1983.SC 2361. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Charlotte Lieber, the daughter of Otto Lieber, member of a prominent German-American family in Indianapolis, worked at Family Service Association in Indianapolis. This collection contains pages from a small loose-leaf notebook on which recipes, family illnesses, and accounts of trips were recorded.


LIEBER, META. Papers, 1894–1932.M 0183. 2 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  Meta Pantzer Lieber came to Indianapolis after her marriage to Carl H. Lieber of H. Lieber Co., 5 June 1895, and died in 1960. She was active in musical and German groups in the city. The collection includes letters; invitations; poems; and notes (1896–1922); and scrapbooks of programs (1894–1932), of concerts, plays, and commencements primarily in Indianapolis and including many German organizations.


LOGANSPORT Diaries, 1956–1980.SC 1960. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of fifteen small, anonymous diaries recounting the daily activities of a small-town housewife including commentary on local business, events, people, and weather.


LONG, JUDITH RIECK. Papers, 1984–1990. M 0739.1 box. Collection guide online.  Judith Reick Long (1935–1987), an antiquarian book dealer, was educated at Indiana University. She and her husband, John Edgar Long, lived in Marietta, Georgia. She authored a biography of Indiana native Gene Stratton-Porter (1863–1924) entitled Gene Stratton-Porter, Novelist and Naturalist,published by the Indiana Historical Society in 1990. This collection consists of papers regarding the completion and publication of Long's book, including correspondence, auction lists for Long's collection of Stratton-Porter and other Indiana-related books, and a typescript copy (180 pages) of Long's work, "Merrily Merrily: The evolution of Gene Stratton-Porter," which served as a draft for her completed book.


LOVE, GENERAL JOHN. Papers, 1837–1886.M 0653, OM 0320. 3 boxes, 3 folders. Collection guide online.  John Love (1820–1881) was born in Virginia and attended West Point (1837–41). In 1849 he married Mary F. Smith (1841–1885), a daughter of Oliver Hampton Smith, a prominent lawyer and Whig politician. The Loves were members of Christ (Episcopal) Church, Indianapolis. While the bulk of this collection relates to the career of General Love, one box is filled with correspondence (1841–85) of Mary Smith Love. Most of the letters deal with social and family letters. A few letters provide insight on contemporary views of women's rights and slavery.


LUCAS, ODESSA B.Papers, ca. 1929.  SC 0992.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  The collection contains an essay by Odessa Beaman Lucas, Life in Rural Indiana in the Eighteen-Eighties.  The essay describes daily life on a farm in Quincy, Owen County, Indiana in the 1880s.


LUSE, ELMINA. Papers, ca. 1865.  SC 0997.  1 folder.  No collection guide available.  The collection includes a series of essays and poems titled The Westland Chronicle, attributed to Elmina (Coffin) Luse of Fairmont, Indiana.  The essays discuss topics such as animals in church, the wonders of God, and the proper use of human energy.  There is also a humorous account of how to cure pigs of lice.


MANSUR, HANNAH. Papers, 1870s–1880s.M 0596. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Hannah Ann Culley Mansur was born in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Indiana, around 1819, the daughter of newspaperman David V. Culley. In 1938 the family moved to Indianapolis, and in 1847 she married William Mansur, an Indianapolis businessman. This collection consists of a scrapbook of business and personal name cards from the1870s and 1880s.


MAYBERRY, SUSANAH. Accounts, 1994–1995.SC 2475. 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Susanah Jameson Mayberry was born in Indianapolis, the daughter of John T. and Florence Jameson and grandniece of author Newton Booth Tarkington. In 1983 she edited letters she had received from Tarkington and published as My Amiable Uncle. This collection includes two accounts written by Mayberry of her experiences during World War II.


MAYE, KATHERINE DAVIS. Collection, 1968–1986.SC 2256. 3 folders. Collection guide online.  Katherine Davis Maye, an Indianapolis public school teacher, sought to recognize achievements of African American alumni of IPS#87. In 1968 she initiated a Hall of Fame wall. This collection includes photographs, biographical information, and news articles related to Hall of Fame inductees.


McCAUGHEY, MARETTA ROBISON. Journal, 1879–1882.SC 1708. 10 folders. No collection guide available.  Maretta McCaughey (1852–1907) was the wife of Bruce McCaughey, a farmer near Findlay, Ohio, and Frankfort, Indiana. The journal covers the first years of marriage and describes her work, social life, and attitudes. Poems written by McCaughey are also included in the collection.


McLEAN, CHARLES G. Papers, 1792–1899.M 0196, BV 1599–1602, BV1926–1935, OM 0045. 6 boxes, 14 volumes, 2 folders. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-253.  Charles G. McLean was a Presbyterian minister who came to Indianapolis in 1852 and established the Indiana Female Seminary. The collection includes the personal papers, correspondence, notebooks, account books, and ephemera of McLean, his mother, Mary McLean, his sister, Florence, his daughters, Margaret and Mary Ann, and his son-in-law, Charles N. Todd. In addition, the collection includes the papers of James Gray, McLean's stepfather.


McNUTT, LOU S. Papers, 1863.SC 0687. 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Lou McNutt was a nurse (or volunteer) at Hospital Number Three, Nashville, Tennessee, in 1863. This collection contains a letter written by McNutt, 1 February 1863, to Emaline Abbott of Fitchville, Huron County, Ohio, informing Abbott of Abbott's son's death.


McPHEETERS FAMILY. Papers, 1940–1952.M 0578. 1 box. Collection guide online.  This collection includes materials relating to the World War II activities of John W. McPheeters (1908–1944) and correspondence (1944–54) relating to Jeannette Epler McPheeters's activities and involvement with the Chamber of Commerce.


MEHRLICH, BERTHA. Scrapbooks, ca. 1896–1960. M 0805. Collection guide online. Bertha Mehrlich was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, as Bertha Jasper, the daughter of Ernst and Caroline Jasper. She performed her first piano solo at her local church in 1896. After attending a children's recital at the Metropolitan School of Music in 1900 she was motivated to take her music seriously and became a student there. In 1902 she began attending the Co-Operative Piano Teachers Association and graduated in 1904. While teaching there she performed for groups and at concerts in Indianapolis. She eventually opened her own studio in 1920. In 1933 she married Dr. John T. Mehrlich. Bertha Mehrlich known to friends as Bertha Jasper continued to play for local churches and other groups in Indianapolis until illness prevented her in 1960. She died in 1962. The collection contains scrapbooks created by Bertha Mehrlich from 1896 to 1960. These were originally bound in twenty-two loose-leaf binders. The folder headings indicate the numerical order of the scrapbooks and their dates. The focus of the notebooks relates to Mehrlich's musical interests and includes concert and recital programs, newspaper clippings, and commentary by Mehrlich about performances she attended. Also in the collection are letters and cards from friends and family, napkins from celebrations, memorials, postcards, and photographs.


MEEKER FAMILY Papers, 1892–1909. M 0571. 1 box. Collection guide online.  The bulk of this collection is composed of letters from Anna Meeker while a student at Union Christian College in Merom, Sullivan County, Indiana, to her stepmother Mary Virginia Wright Meeker (Jennie) in Stone Bluff, Fountain County, Indiana (1892-97). Topics include college life, classes, friends, and events at school.


MEREDITH, SOLOMON. Papers, 1833–1898.M 0203, F 0589–0591. 3 boxes, 3 microfilm reels.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-264.  Solomon Meredith (1812–75), a Quaker, was a soldier, politician, businessman, and farmer of Wayne County, Indiana. Virginia Claypool Meredith, wife of Solomon Meredith's son, Henry (1843–82), was president of the Board of Women Managers for the 1893 World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois. The collection includes materials relating to Virginia Meredith's involvement with the exposition.


MERRILL, SAMUEL. Papers, 1812–1934.M 0204, OM 0132. 9 boxes, 7 folders. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-266, A-267.  Samuel Merrill (1792–1855) was an Indianapolis businessman, politician, and attorney; Indiana state treasurer; president, State Bank of Indiana; and president, Madison and Indianapolis Railroad. The collection includes the letters of Merrill's wife Jane (1834–48) and daughters, Julia, Mina, and Catherine (1855–1908), from the Cleveland, Ohio, Female Seminary, and from Indianapolis and Vermont.


MERRILL-GRAYDON FAMILY. Papers, 1836–1930.M 0609, OM 0272. 4 boxes, 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Materials in this collection include correspondence, club papers, official documents, clippings, books, and photographs, 1836–1930, relating to the activities of Catharine Merrill (1824–1900), Jane Graydon, Katherine Merrill Graydon, and Julia Graydon Jameson. There is also genealogical material on several families including Alexander, Bodine, Dumont, Graydon, McKinney, and Merrill.


MILLER, DORCAS. Letter, 1852.SC 1074. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  This collection contains a letter from Dorcas Miller, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, 4 April 1852, to Mrs. Dorothy Miller, Brandon, Vermont. In it the illness of her husband and her great loneliness at being so far from family and friends is mentioned.


MILLER, MICHAEL H., COLLECTION, 1834–2000.  P 0385.  5 boxes of black-and-white photographs, 6 folders of color photographs, 1 box of oversize negatives, 6 boxes of manuscripts, 5 nitrate negatives, 5 albums, 5 bound volumes, 6 oversize folders. Collection guide online. Willis Kise Miller (1867–1955) was the son of David Varner Miller and Verlinda Miller of Clermont, Indiana.. He married Isabelle Aurelia (1872–1965) and the union bore one child, Herschel Miller. Isabelle Aurelia Miller attended New Bethel Girl’s School and Butler University. She was active in club work, particularly the Irvington Tuesday Club, and was a member of the First Baptist Church. The collection includes scrapbooks and notes related to the activities of the Tuesday Club. Other material includes photostats of genealogical records concerning the Miller, and Brendel families, legal documents, business records, photographs, clippings, and ephemera. Included are transcripts of letters written by Martha (Varner) Hornaday regarding patent medicines, and the activities of her young son, William Temple Hornady.  Other correspondence includes letters to Lena A. Miller from her brother, George E. Miller.  The photographs in this collection include albums assembled by the Kitley, Moore, Hornaday, and Miller families. The images date from the 1860s to the 1930s.


MILLER, VIRGINIA. Letter, 1944–1945.SC 2027. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of one letter written by Miller from the Mariana Islands, December 1944–January 1945. It describes Miller's wedding, her daily activities as a Red Cross worker, and camp life.


MONDOR, COLLEEN. USS INDIANAPOLIS CORRESPONDENCE. 1995-1996.  M 0782.  1 Manuscript box.  Collection guide online. Colleen Mondor was a student at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, in 1996 when she wrote letters to survivors of the USS Indianapolis, a cruiser that was torpedoed between Guam and Layte in 1945.  The collection contains letters from 47 of the survivors (or their family members) to Ms. Mondor regarding the ship’s sinking and Captain Charles Butler McVay’s III’s responsibility in the ship’s loss. The letters are generally quite candid and are supportive of their captain’s innocence in the sinking.  In a few instances the survivor had recently died and was answered by his widow.  In other cases the veteran was too ill to respond and his wife or other family member wrote the letters.


MONTGOMERY, ALICE. Diary, 1879–1883.SC 2449. 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Alice Montgomery was the adopted daughter of John and Julia Ann Montgomery. The family resided in Halbert Township, Martin County, Indiana, between 1879 and 1882. Alice Montgomery married Charles S. Brown about 1884. Montgomery's diary describes daily activities on the farm and in nearby churches.


MOORES, JULIA MERRILL. Papers, 1838–1896.M 0213. 1 box.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-275.  Moores was the daughter of Indianapolis banker Samuel Merrill and wife of Indianapolis bookseller Charles W. Moores. The collection consists of Moores's correspondence, mostly from the period before she was married (1840–54). Included are letters written by her to her family while she was traveling east with Henry Ward Beecher (1841); teaching school in Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana (1844); and visiting family in Waterproof, Louisiana (1845–46).


MORRISON, SARAH PARKE. Autobiography, ca.1919.SC 2143. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Morrison, daughter of Indiana University Board President John J. Morrison, was the first woman to graduate from Indiana University (1869), completing the four-year course in two years. The collection consists of a typescript of an autobiographical account written by Morrison to her friend, Frances Higgins of Woodlawn, Ohio, and later published in the Indianapolis Star. Morrison describes the various difficulties she encountered as a student and the encouragement she received.


MORRISON, SARAH T. Letter, 1839.SC 1114. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  A letter written by Sarah Morrison from Rising Sun (Dearborn County to 1844 then Ohio County), Indiana, 24 April 1839, to Miss Mary Carpenter, New Utrecht, Long Island, New York. Religious sentiments, teaching, location of school, number of pupils, and subjects taught are all mentioned.


MORROW, ESTELLE. Diary, 1861–1862.SC 1115. 3 folders. No collection guide available.  Estelle Morrow lived in Piqua and Gambier, Ohio, and taught music in the Lebanon (Indiana) Academy of Music for six months. The diary, 16 October 1861 through 31 December 1862, relates information on social life and news of the Civil War.


MORTON, THOMAS J. JR. Papers, 1951-1975.  SC 2675.  8 folders.  Collection guide online.  The majority of this collection consists of correspondence between Indiana artist Marie Goth and Thomas J. Morton, Jr. Goth painted portraits of famous individuals including General Douglas MacArthur, James Whitcomb Riley, and Indiana governor Henry F. Schricker.  The letters were written between 1972 and 1975.  Other material concerning Goth includes obituary clippings, and brochures.


MάHL, ANITA MARY. Biography, ca. 1999.  SC 2674.  1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Anita Mary Mόhl was born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, in 1886.  She graduated from Indiana University in 1920 with her MD degree and received a PhD from George Washington University in 1923.  Mόhl’s medical career spanned 1920–52.  This collection consists of one unpublished biography detailing Mόhl’s trailblazing life and adventures in the medical profession by Siegmar Muehl.


MULLEN, GEORGE E. Papers, 1830–1867.  SC 2565.  4 folders.  Collection guide online.  The collection consists mostly of correspondence addressed to George E. Mullen, a private in the 54th Ohio Infantry, Company C.  The items include letters from his mother, Margaret Mullen, of New Castle, Indiana.


MUNDELL, KARREN E. Vietnam Correspondence, 1966–1967. M 0700. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Kowalski, born Karen E. Mundell in San Francisco, California, and raised in Frankfort, Indiana, is a nursing administrator and educator, women's health advocate, and author. After graduating from Indiana University in 1965 with a nursing degree, she entered the Army Nurse Corps and served during 1966–1967 at the Biκn Hςa Air Base, Vietnam. She also served in Landstuhl, Germany, where she met and married Walter A. Kowalski. She returned to the U.S. in 1969, settling near Denver, Co. The collection contains approximately 90 letters written by Kowalski in Vietnam to her parents in Frankfort, Indiana, while serving as an intensive care recovery nurse. She describes her activities and those of the hospital, and gives her impression of the Vietnamese people, the American soldiers at the air base, and the conflict around her.


MYERS, GERALDINE MCFERREN.  Collection, ca. 1871-1981.P 0291.17 boxes.Collection guide online.Geraldine Elizabeth McFerren Myers (1904-1983) was born in Hartford City, Indiana, the daughter of a successful grocer. She graduated from Hartford City High School in 1921 and lived with her parents until her marriage to Robert J. Myers in 1933. The union bore one child, Robert Eugene Myers (Bobby) in 1935. The couple separated in 1941 and divorced the following October. Geraldine Myers never remarried, and raised her son in Hartford City, working part-time at the family grocery store. She had a long-term relationship with one man, which she broke off shortly after he moved into her neighborhood. Myers’ brother, Russell McFerren (1901-1967) operated the store after his father’s death. Russell McFerren was married to Minnie Walsmith (1902-1960), a teacher at William Reed School, Hartford City. Minnie McFerren was murdered in her classroom by the school principal. Bobby Myers committed suicide in 1969. The collection is composed of family portraits and snapshots created or collected by three generations of the McFerren family. Geraldine McFerren Myers created most of the images, almost one thousand images of family and friends. The volume of photographs in the collection provide a multitude of subtle details about family interactions and possible rivalries, and, in the case of Bobby, presents possible clues for why he took his own life. Photographs of Geraldine McFerren Myers portray a woman who did not hide her emotions easily. She had an extremely expressive face which, from childhood, did not always smile for the camera.


NAUDAIN, BELLE W. Papers, 1860. OM 0198. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Diploma received by Naudain upon graduation from Charlestown Female Institute, 1860.


NEWSOME, MAENELL H. Collection, 1937–1976.SC 1976. 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Maenell Newsome was a teacher and head of the foreign language department at Broad Ripple High School in Indianapolis. This collection documents some of Newsome's activities in Indianapolis, most notably with the Crispus Attucks Orchestra Band Parents' Club founded in 1940 by her husband. Part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project.


NICHOLSON, VALENTINE. Collection, 1841–1915.M 0641, OM299. 5 boxes, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Valentine Nicholson of Ohio and Indiana was a member of the Society of Friends in his early life, but withdrew from the faith because of his ardent abolitionist feelings. Nicholson and his wife Jane Wales experimented in communalism with their establishment of "Prairie Home," displayed an interest in Spiritualism, and participated in seances. The collection includes correspondence of Jane Wales and the Nicholsons' daughters Elizabeth, Mary Ellen, and Martha.


NIXON-WIECHMAN Collection, 1773–1962.M 0483, BV 2341–2370, OMB 0008. 2 boxes, 37 volumes. Collection guide in library.  This collection contains items related to the history of Richmond and Wayne County. Among these records are several family histories and minute books (1887–99) of an organization known as The Cycle, a women's club interested in discussing the history of colonial America.


OHMART, JOLINE Papers, 1971–1979.M 0610. 3 boxes. Collection guide online.  Joline Moore Ohmart is an Indianapolis businesswoman. This collection consists of Ohmart's correspondence with national and state politicians promoting an Equal Rights Amendment, correspondence and pamphlets from various women's political organizations, and other materials relating to equal rights and employment standards.


OSBORN, LOUISE BROWN. Papers, 1919–1945.M 0632. 1 box. Collection guide online.  This collection includes correspondence, primarily 1922–24, with family members while Osborn was a student at Indiana University and Yale University. Two interesting letters relate to the election of 1922 in which her father, Lane Osborn, was a candidate.


OSTERMEIER/BUESKING FAMILIES. Papers, 1849–1979.M 0665, OM 0335. 1 box, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The papers in this collection center on Sophie Luise Eleanor (Ellen) Schwartz and her husbands, Christian Ostermeier and Frederick Buesking. Sophie (Ellen) Schwartz (1849–1921) was born in Germany and immigrated with her family to the United States in 1850. The family settled on land in Buck Creek Township, Hancock County, Indiana. In 1871 Ellen Schwartz married a fellow German immigrant Christian Ostermeier (1842–1874). Following the death of her first husband Ellen met and married Frederick Buesking (1855–1936), also originally from Germany. The papers include correspondence and family documents as well as an Ostermeier/Buesking family history (1979) by Jacqueline K. Johnson.


OSTROM, SUSAN MCWHIRTER. Papers, 1843–1980.M 0337. 24 boxes. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-288.  Civic leader and journalist, Ostrom was a women's club columnist for the Indianapolis News (1913–63); member, advisory council, Indiana Federation of Clubs (1913–63); and director, Public Relations and Information Division, Indiana Department of Public Instruction (1942–47). The collection includes Ostrom's correspondence with politicians regarding the Equal Rights Amendment, school prayer, and other political issues, primarily from the late 1960s and the 1970s; her writings, including poems, speeches, newspaper articles, and editorials on women's rights and other political issues (1897–1980); papers relating to her work for civic improvements and rights for the blind; papers relating to the Indiana Federation of Clubs, the Woman's Department Club of Indianapolis, and the Women's Christian Temperance Union; and scrapbooks, clippings, publications, plaques, and awards regarding Ostrom's life and service to the community.


OWEN, MARY STEELE. Book Manuscript, ca. 1960.M 0654. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Mary Steele Owen, a teacher, was born in Indianapolis and graduated from Franklin College. She later earned a master's and doctoral degree from Indiana University. From 1937 to 1943 Owen taught in high schools and later at Indiana University, Butler University, Franklin College, and Sam Houston State College in Texas. The collection contains a book manuscript based on Owen's 1954 doctoral dissertation entitled: The American Frontiersman: A French Portrait. It discusses the American frontier as seen by French travelers.


PALMER, MARY JANE. Travel Diary, 1865.BV 2480. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of Palmer's 1865 travel diary describing a trip from Norwich, Connecticut, through Michigan to Attica, Fountain County, Indiana, where she visited her cousin, W. R. Palmer, a Presbyterian minister. She also describes trips to Illinois and her return trip home through Ohio and Pennsylvania. The collection includes a family portrait.


PARKER, LUCILLE. Memory Book, 1924–1925.SC 2474. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  [Helen] Lucille Parker, born about 1908, attended high school in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana. The memory book in this collection dates from her high school years.


PATTERSON, FRANCES O. Collection, 1862–1969.M 0470. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Frances O. Fowlkes Patterson's family, the Tyrees, migrated to Indianapolis from Tennessee in the mid-1870s. The collection contains family records, correspondence, and photographs, and includes letters from Patterson to her mother, Jennie Tyree Fowlkes. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


PAUGH, IONE SWAN, Collection. 1872–1971.M 0404. 4 boxes. Collection guide online.  Although the bulk of this collection relates to William F. Swan and his brother, James, of Benton County, Indiana, there are two small diaries (1873–74) of Ellen Mahaffey, a half sister of Elizabeth Sanders Swan (Mrs. William F.). The diaries relate details of weather conditions and family activities of an Indiana farm family.


PEGG, LYDIA J. Papers, 1882–1925.M 0223. 2 boxes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-296.  Pegg was the wife of John Pegg, a Bloomingsport, Randolph County, Indiana, farmer. The collection is composed primarily of letters to Pegg from her sisters: Lizzie Roberts, wife of a Paton, Iowa, farmer; and Hulda Rees, wife of Seth Rees, an itinerant Quaker preacher. The bulk of the letters are from the period 1898–1914 and describe family matters, farm life, and Quaker camp meetings throughout the East and Midwest.


PHILON, LOIS PATRICIA. PAPERS, 1970-1987.  M0773.5 manuscript boxes, 7 oversize folders, 6 folders of photographs. Collection guide online. Lois Patricia Philon (b. 1935) ran as a Democrat for the Indiana House of Representatives, District 32, in 1974 and 1978. Philon was highly active in the women's movement, serving on a number of boards and committees including the League of Women Voters of Indiana, the Indiana Women's Political Caucus, the Indiana Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., and NOW. She also served on the board of directors for the Family Crisis Shelter of Montgomery County, and was a staff worker for the Women in Politics Campaign Course (Indiana University, Indianapolis,1977). The collection includes material created or accumulated by Philon through her political activities and involvement with the women's movement in Indiana. Items include records concerning campaign activities, correspondence, minutes, printed material, maps, photographs, and artifacts. Included are items concerning the Equal Rights Amendment, the Uniform Marital Property Act (UMPA), and International Women's Year. Printed material includes issues 1 and 2 of Womankind, a women's newspaper published in Indiana.


PLUMB, FAILEY, PARROTT FAMILY. Papers, 1814–1910.M 0003, OM 0126. 1 box, 1 folder. Collection guide online. This collection concerns several generations of the Plumb family, originally of Massachusetts, which married into the Coffin family of Nantucket and the Failey family, one of whom married into the Parrott family of Indianapolis. Correspondence includes a series of letters written to Mrs. Plumb from female relatives, primarily Sarah Cannon, in Nantucket.


POTTS, JAMES M. Collection, 1857–1866.M 0481. 1 box. Collection guide in library.  James M. and Jemima M. Potts lived in Wolcottsville, Lagrange County, Indiana. The collection consists of approximately 170 letters written between 1857 and 1866, primarily during the Civil War. Jemima's letters deal with local and family news.


POWER, REUBEN H. Papers, 1863–1961.SC 1216, OM 0285. 5 folders. Collection guide online.  Reuben H. Power served on the gunboat Somerset off the Florida Keys during the Civil War. He married Lula (Lulie) Monroe (d. 1894). They lived in Indianapolis and had a daughter Pearl. The collection includes Lulie Power's personal journal (1867–73) and material concerning Pearl.


PRICE-MOORE FAMILY. Papers,ca. 1850–1956.  M 0701.  1 box.  Collection guide in library.  This collection consists of correspondence and papers relating to the Price-Moore family of Clinton and Tippecanoe Counties, Indiana.  Included are letters from Lydia Moore to her brother James Allan of the 10th Indiana Infantry Regiment, and to her husband James D. Moore of the 150th Indiana Infantry Regiment.  Also included is a letter from Lydia to an Elva Bell of Frankfort while Lydia was a resident at the Indiana State Soldier's Home (1917?), an essay by Lydia, and a mortgage signed by Lydia and James Moore in 1876.


PUGH, MATTIE MURLE THARP. Diary, 1954.SC 2483. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Mattie Pugh (born ca. 1881) lived in Montpelier, Blackford County, Indiana. This collection contains Pugh's diary for 1954. Day-to-day activities and occasional references to current events and disasters are described.


RANDOLPH, CATHERINE S. LAWRENCE. Papers, 1802–1824 .SC 1235. 6 folders.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-308.  Catherine Randolph (1789–1816) was a stepdaughter of General James Dill and a granddaughter of Northwest Territory governor Arthur St. Clair. She married Thomas Randolph in 1810, attorney general of the Indiana Territory at Vincennes, Knox County. The collection consists of correspondence of the Dill-Lawrence-Randolph families (1802–24). The letters, primarily to or from Catherine S. Lawrence Randolph, relate news of family events, trips, politics, and local events.


RICHARDSON, IDA FRANCES. Papers, 1828–1933.M 0237, BV 1710–1719, OM 0050. 6 boxes, 10 volumes, 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-313.  Richardson was an art student at St. Mary's Institute (now St. Mary-of-the-Woods), Vigo County; an Indianapolis schoolteacher; secretary of the Marion County Agricultural and Horticultural Society; and writer and poet. The collection includes Richardson's diaries; her notebooks and correspondence relating to St. Mary's Institute; and scrapbooks, notebooks, and poetry.


RICHARDSON, ROSELYN. Papers, 1900–1993.M 0649, OM 0131. 41 boxes, 5 folders. Collection guide online.  Roselyn Comer Richardson, educator and civic and religious leader, has been a resident of Indianapolis since 1938. She has served on the board of directors of the Phyllis Wheatley YWCA, as co-director of the Intercollegiate Coeducational Club of the Senate Avenue YMCA, and as director of the Flanner Guild. During the 1970s Richardson directed the Career Sampling Program at Shortridge High School. This collection reflects the many years of public service Richardson has given the Indianapolis community. Among materials in the collection are those which relate to her activities with the Career Sampling Program, Friends of the Indianapolis Urban League, American Friends Service Committee, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Browsers Book Club, and Dialogue Today.


RILEY, ADELINE. Letters, 1869–1876.SC 1267. 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Adeline Riley was born in Burlington, Carroll County, Indiana, about 1816. Letters in this collection were written from Greene County, Indiana, 1869–76.


RILEY, JAMES WHITCOMB. Collection, 1880–1956.M 0240, OMB 0057. 4 boxes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-3l5.  This collection includes correspondence and verse of Indiana poet James Whitcomb Riley (1880–1916); correspondence (1873–1964) of Margaret M. Scott, a journalist; correspondence (1912–51) of Harriet [Eitel] Wells Johnson (ca. 1880–1958); World War I journal of Cornelius H. Menger who served as a captain in the Coast Artillery Corps in the U. S. Army; correspondence of Harry A. and Caroline Michael Kahn of Indianapolis; and a book, James Whitcomb Riley: Reminiscences, by Clara E. Laughlin with twenty five tipped-in letters from Riley to Laughlin (1897–99 and 1903).


RITCHEY, FLORENCE AND ISAAC. PAPERS, 1903–1953.M 0736, OM 0388. 2 boxes; 3 oversize folders. Collection guide online.  Florence Etta Gambill (b. 1883), daughter of Marion F. and Rose (Powell) Gambill, was a native of Sullivan County, Indiana. She attended Brown's Business College and the State Normal College in Terre Haute. Florence taught school, worked in an insurance agency, and in June 1910 moved to Colorado to open an insurance agency which apparently failed. By 1927, she had married Isaac S. Ritchey, who may have been a native of Colorado. By 1931, Florence and Isaac were living in Bloomfield in Greene County, Indiana. They operated Ritchey's Leader Store, a clothing and shoe store. In June 1932, Florence was appointed receiver of the Star Coal Company. The receivership was closed in November 1937 and the company was sold. The Ritcheys also invested in land in Arkansas, Colorado, and Illinois. During World War II, Florence assisted with the Greene County Chapter of the American Red Cross. The collection consists of the correspondence and papers of Florence and Isaac Ritchey and records relating to their involvement with the Ritchey's Leader Store and the Star Coal Company.


ROBBINS, ARREANNA. Diary, 1865–1870.SC 2418. 5 folders. Collection guide online.  Arreanna Robbins lived on a family farm in Orange County, Indiana, between 1865 and 1870. This collection contains diaries kept by Robbins, 1865–70. Entries are brief, describing weather, health problems, religious meetings, and other aspects of daily life on a farm.


ROBBINS, MARGARET. Oral history project materials, ca. 1992.SC 1927, CT 0809–0814. 3 folders, 6 audiotapes. Collection guide online.  The Marion County/Indianapolis Historical Society received an Indiana Heritage Research Grant to produce a project entitled the Margaret Robbins Oral History Project. Margaret Ruth (Schricker) Robbins (b. 1916), the daughter of Henry Frederick and Maude Lucinda (Brown) Schricker, was raised in Knox, Indiana. Her father served as state senator (1932–36) and as governor of Indiana (1941–45 and 1949–51). Robbins studied political science and history at Indiana University, graduating in 1938. She married Lewis C. Robbins (d. 1990), who served as the first chief of cancer control for the United States Public Health Service. The Robbinses moved frequently throughout Mr. Lewis' career, and moved to Indianapolis in 1968. Margaret Robbins worked for the USO during World War II to organize "Ladies in Waiting," a prenatal health care club for servicemen's wives, for the State Department with the Foreign Aid program, and with the "Tycoon Program" in the 1960s. For thirteen years, she was the director of a family training program for the International Cooperation Administration. This collection consists of six audiocassette tapes of interviews conducted by Linda Weintraut and Jane R. Nolan of Weintraut & Nolan, Consulting Historians, with Margaret Robbins. Mrs. Robbins discussed her family background; local, state, and national politics, including her father's career; her studies at Indiana University, the Great Depression; the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana; her work and life; and her husband's career with the Public Health Service.


ROBERTS, HELEN. Diary, 1862–1863.SC 1276. 2 folders. No collection guide available.  Helen Roberts lived near Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana. The diary contains a record of her daily activities, deaths in the area, and weather conditions.


ROBERTSON, CARRIE FRANCIS. Journals, 1890–1924.BV 0311–0336. 26 volumes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-317.  Robertson, the wife of Alexander M. Robertson, an Indianapolis wholesale grocer, was a club woman; president of the Matinee Musicale; honorary vice-president of the National Federation of Music Clubs; and member of the Indianapolis Woman's Club, the Propylaeum Club, Indianapolis, and the board of directors of Butler University, Indianapolis. She traveled extensively in Europe, North Africa, Australia, the South Sea Islands, and the United States. The collection consists of Robertson's travel journals describing her trips to Europe, the Caribbean, North Africa, Egypt, Hawaii, Australia, and the South Sea Islands; her tours through the United States; and the 1916 and 1920 Republican National Conventions, which she attended. The journals include postcards and clippings relating to the places she visited.


ROBINSON, JOSEPHINE. Album.OMB 0019. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Josephine Robinson was a granddaughter of Indianapolis pioneer Daniel Yandes and wrote a biography of Yandes and his family in 1936. This collection consists of an album of photographs of the house at 1801 North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, both interior and exterior, for Josephine Robinson by her sister.


ROST FAMILY. Papers, 1882–1898.M 0668. 3 boxes. Collection guide online.  Carl L. Rost (1864–1946), jeweler and optometrist, was born in Friendship, Hendricks County, Indiana. In 1888 he married Helena Roesgen of Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana. Helena Roesgen was a teacher at North School in Bartholomew County, prior to her marriage. The collection is mainly composed of personal correspondence between Carl and Helena from their courtship and throughout their married life. While most are affectionate in nature, there is also mention of daily activities and local and national events. Material relating to Helena's education and employment as a teacher also forms part of the collection.


ROYSE-GANDY Papers, 1837–1918.SC 2478, OM 0323. 7 folders. Collection guide online.  James F. Royse lived in Washington County, Indiana, and Mary F. Gandy lived in New Albany, Floyd County, Indiana. The collection consists of correspondence between Royse and Gandy.


RUSSO, DOROTHY RITTER. Papers, 1894–1970.M 0242, BV 1721. 2 boxes, 1 volume.  Collection guide online.  Dorothy Ritter Russo was an Indianapolis native and 1922 graduate of DePauw University. She started her career as a social worker in New York and later worked for the Marion County, Indiana, Public Welfare Department (1953–70). In 1931, with her husband Anthony J. Russo, she opened the Hoosier Book Shop in Indianapolis. One of their projects was publication of bibliographies of Indiana authors. The collection includes correspondence, illustrations, and other materials relating to a Tarkington bibliography, a medical history of Indiana, George Ade, and Jacob Blanck.


RUSSO, DOROTHY RITTER. Papers II, 1970s.M 0569. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Dorothy Ritter Russo was an Indianapolis native and 1922 graduate of DePauw University. She started her career as a social worker in New York and later worked for the Marion County, Indiana, Public Welfare Department (1953–70). In 1931, with her husband Anthony J. Russo, she opened the Hoosier Book Shop in Indianapolis. One of their projects was publication of bibliographies of Indiana authors. This collection includes research notes, correspondence, clippings, and related materials used by Russo for an unpublished update of her 1939 book on Kin Hubbard and Abe Martin.


SACKVILLE, WINIFRED & WINIFRED SACKVILLE STONER JR.: A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY, 1994.SC 2396. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  This collection consists of one item, a photocopy of "Winifred Sackville Stoner and Winifred Sackville Stoner, Junior: A Selected Bibliography," by Maria (Koens) Nix, 1994.


SAILORS, LUCILLE. Papers, 1917–1919.SC 2398. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  This collection is a transcription of letters written to Lucille (Sailors) Shoemaker in Wabash, Indiana, by servicemen between 1917 and 1919. Russell L. Woodward completed the transcription as an Eagle Scout project in 1993.


SCHAEFER, MARY E. J. Papers, 1923–1928. M 0727, BV 3278. 1 box, 1 bound volume, and one folder of visual material. Collection guide online.  Mary E. J. and Fritz Schaefer operated the Schaefer Frame Manufacturing Company in Indianapolis. Fritz (1888–1980) was a native of Wiesbaden, Germany. He graduated from Cologne University before immigrating to the United States in 1922. He came to Indianapolis and began working in the framing factory of H. Lieber and Company. In 1923, Fritz and Mary were married. After the Lieber factory closed (ca. 1939), the Schaefers founded their own company, in operation until ca. 1958. The collection consists of two diaries and a scrapbook belonging to Mary Schaefer. The first diary is entitled "Our Wedding Trip." It was originally written in 1923, and this copy was presented to Fritz Schaefer on his 36th birthday the following year. The 1928 diary and scrapbook detail Mary Schaefer's trip to France, Germany and Holland, which included a visit to Fritz's family in Wiesbaden. The diary records Mary's impressions and activities, while the scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, telegrams, programs, and other mementos.


SCHNEE, JACOB. Biography, 1784–1838.SC 2052. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of a manuscript biography of Jacob Schnee, a Lutheran minister who founded utopian religious communities both in Pennsylvania and in Indiana. It includes information on Schnee's family and on women's education.


SELBY, EVELYN FORSYTH. Reminiscences, ca. 1966.SC 2208. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Evelyn Forsyth Selby (1906–1996) was the daughter of Indiana artist William Forsyth (1854–1935). This collection contains an account by Selby of Cedar Farm, located near Brandenburg, Mead County, Kentucky.


SEVENTY-FIFTH INDIANA REGIMENT. Autograph book, ca. 1862–1867.SC 1839. 2 folders. Collection guide in library.  This collection consists of an autograph book presented to a Miss Adelia (possibly a nurse) from soldiers in the 75th Indiana Regiment in the Civil War. The soldiers' entries, dated 1862, list their companies as A, H, and M. However, according to Terrell (Vol. 6, p. 225), the soldiers were members of company G. Those who signed the book include: Frank [Francis N.] Childers, G[eorge H.] Hilligoss, W[illiam] J. Hilligoss, J[oel] W. McMahon, S[tephen] Metcalf, George Overshimer, Emanuel Owen, and Wright Smith. Additional entries, dating from 1865 to 1867, from unidentified individuals are found toward the end of the book.


SEWALL, MAY WRIGHT. AVOWED FEMINIST.By Hester Anne Hale.BV 2638. 1 volume. Collection guide online.  May Eliza Wright Sewall (1844–1920) was an educator, suffragist, clubwoman, and pacifist. An unpublished biography, "May Wright Sewall: Avowed Feminist," by Hester Anne Hale, 1992, forms this collection.


SHARPE, JULIA GRAYDON. Papers, 1878–1932.M 0673, BV 3061–3062, OM 0363. 3 boxes, 2 volumes, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Julia Graydon Sharpe (ca. 1857–1939) was born in Indianapolis, the daughter of Joseph Kinne and Mary Ellen [Graydon] Sharpe. Sharpe attended private schools in Indianapolis and the Chegaray Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Returning to Indianapolis she attended Love and Gookin's first Indiana School of Art (1878–80), and from 1894 to 1896 she was a student of William Forsyth and T. C. Steele in the second Indiana School of Art. During the winter of 1896–97 Sharpe studied in New York at the Art Students League and at William Merritt Chase's School of Art. She was a member of the Indianapolis Flower Mission, the Portfolio Club, and the Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and active with the Second Presbyterian Church and the Home for Aged Women (now the Indianapolis Retirement Home). The collection contains correspondence, literary compositions, photographs, sketches, and sketchbooks reflecting her life's activities.


SHARPE, MARY ELLEN GRAYDON. Papers, 1846–1911.SC 1793. 5 folders. Collection guide online.  Mary Ellen Graydon Sharpe (1823–1914) was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Alexander and Jane Chambers [McKinney] Graydon. Mary Ellen graduated from Cedar Hill Seminary near Pittsburgh. In 1843 the Graydon family moved to Indianapolis, and in 1847 Mary Ellen married Joseph K. Sharpe. She wrote three books: A Family Retrospect (published in 1909), a book of poetry, As the Years Go By (published in 1913), and an account of her early years in the Second Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis in 1911. This collection contains correspondence, a narrative, and photographs.


SHIPP, MARGARET M. Papers, 1904–1936.SC 1339. 5 folders.  Collection guide in library.  This collection includes several letters and some poems and short stories. One story, "Ere His Prime," 1920, is identified as having been written by Indiana author and sister of Margaret, May Louise Shipp.


SHULL, AVRIEL. Architectural Records. 1949-1999. M 0759, OMB 0085. 21 boxes, 6 rolled drawings, approximately 2,000 architectural drawings. Collection guide online. The collection contains the business records and architectural drawings of “Avriel,” an architectural design and building company based in Carmel, Indiana. “Avriel” was Avriel Shull (1933-76).  Shull designed and supervised construction of homes and apartment buildings in Marion and Hamilton Counties (Indiana) from the 1950s to the mid-1970s. She also decorated the interiors of many of these homes.


SIMPSON, ELIZABETH. Papers, 1790–1880.SC 1349. 6 folders.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-332.  Elizabeth Simpson was a resident of Fayette County, Kentucky. The collection consists of letters to Simpson from relatives in Eugene, Vermillion County; Rockville, Parke County; and Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, most from the period 1836–48, relating to politics, health, and economic conditions. Also included are Simpson's coverlet patterns and receipts for schooling of children.


SLIGO IRON FORGE ACCOUNT BOOK; KEPHART, MCELRATH FAMILY PAPERS. 1845-ca. 1919.  BV 0085, SC 1655.  1 bound volume, 2 folders.  Collection guide online.  The collection contains a ledger for Charles Crocker's iron forge at Sligo, Marshall County, Indiana, ca. 1845–ca. 1847.  Elizabeth Kephart kept the books for Crocker.  The volume includes customer names, and penciled annotations, poems, and musings likely written by several generations of women from the McElrath, Kephart, and related families.  The entries date from the 1840s to ca. 1880, and include single statements, poems, and confessionals concerning unrequited love.


SMITH, BENJAMIN WILSON. Collection, 1850–1917.M 0253. 2 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  Benjamin Wilson Smith (1830–1921) was an educator, Methodist minister, merchant, author, and politician. He graduated from Indiana Asbury (DePauw) University in 1855 and in the same year married Ruth Ann Rankin (d. 1920). Sarah Tittle Barrett Bolton was born in Newport, Kentucky, the oldest of six children of Esther Pendleton and Jonathan Belcher Barrett. The family moved to a frontier farm in Indiana on Six-Mile Creek northeast of Vernon in Jennings County while Bolton was still a child. She married Nathaniel Bolton of Madison, Indiana, an editor, in 1831. She married second, Addison Reese. Bolton was a leader in the early movement for women's legal rights and aided Robert Dale Owen in his successful fight in the State Constitutional Convention of 1850 and the legislature of 1851 for personal property rights for married women. While this collection mainly concerns Benjamin Smith, it does include a letter from Sarah Bolton (1874) to Miss Lou Rankin, Indianapolis, describing sights in and around Geneva, Switzerland. Filed with this letter is a lace cap of Bolton's.


SMITH, DOROTHEA E. (WEST). Scrapbook, ca. 1935–1939.SC 2610, OMB 0065. 6 folders and 1 oversize box. Collection guide online.  Dorothea Elizabeth West was a resident of Indianapolis and a high school and college student during the last half of the 1930s. She later married a man named Smith. The collection consists of a scrapbook kept by Dorothea West as a young woman in Indianapolis. It includes clippings, greeting cards, postcards, programs, menus, photographs, school pennants, and correspondence, including a letter from Frederic M. Ayres. Items come mostly from the Indianapolis area.


SMITH, ELVIRA MAYHEW. Letters, 1880–1899.SC1362. 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  Elvira Mayhew Smith (Mrs. William P.) was a resident of Indianapolis. Letters in this collection are from prominent women in response to requests for quilt blocks.


SMITH, GEORGE R. Papers, 1852–1863.SC 1899. 7 folders. No collection guide available. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-339.  Smith was a farmer near Rome City, Noble County, Indiana, and a soldier with the 12th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. Included in this collection are letters that Smith wrote to his wife, Margaret, during the Civil War as well as letters she wrote to him describing home life during the war.


SMITH, KATHARINE. Collection, 1820–1912.SC 2298. 5 folders. Collection guide online.  Katharine Smith was a resident of Greenwood, Indiana. This collection consists of letters, legal documents, and diary transcripts (1820–1912). While the correspondence relates mainly to relatives and ancestors, the diaries record a trip (1912) through Central and South America.


SMITH, LIZZY. Memory album, 1854–1862. BV 2076. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of a memory album of Lizzy Smith, 1854–62.


SMITH, MARY ANN. Diary, 1869–1874.SC 1369, BV 1744. 1 folder, 1 volume.  Collection guide in library.  Mary Ann Smith was the daughter of Samuel F. Smith, a moderately successful Indianapolis businessman. In the early 1870s Smith married Julius F. Pratt, an employee and later partner of her father. The diary has entries describing daily activities and social life of an Indianapolis woman in her early twenties.


SNELL FAMILY. Papers, 1817–1860.SC 1378. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The Snell family, originally from Paris, Oneida County, New York, settled in Indianapolis in 1834. Letters in this collection trace the peregrinations of a family on the move.


SNOWDEN, JULIET OTT. Collection, 1836–1914.M 0446. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Juliet Ott Strouse Snowden (1913–1987) was born in Rockville, Parke County, the daughter of Claude and Marcia Strouse. In 1936 she married John Wayne Snowden, and they had four children. She attended Indiana State University and Indiana University, ran a gift shop from 1953 to 1960, and published three books: Legends and Lore of Parke County (1967), Covered Bridges of Parke County (1969), and Covered Bridge Guide Book (1970). This collection contains materials reflecting her various interests including correspondence, minutes, diaries, historical essays, and an autograph book dated 1836–1914.


SPEARS FAMILY. Papers, 1930–1986.M 0488, OM 0118. 3 boxes, 3 folders. Collection guide online.  This collection contains papers of the Spears family (1932–84). It includes correspondence and documents of Jean and John Spears, papers of their daughter Claudia Polley, which detail her education and music career, and materials relating to community and church work of the family. Part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project.


SPELLMAN, MARY B. Scrapbook, 1923–1924.BV 0815. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The scrapbook, kept by Mary B. (Mrs. Royal B.) Spellman, 1923–24, includes clippings about the Indianapolis Council of Women, Indiana Woman's Republican Club, League of Women Voters, the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and the Indiana Federation of Clubs.


SPRAY, SARAH. Diary, 1862.SC 1392, F 0352. 2 folders, 1 microfilm reel. No collection guide available.  A Quaker, in 1862 Sarah Spray was living with relatives near Bridgeport, Indiana. The diary records, with daily entries, a visit to Ohio.


STARKS, DEBORAH. Collection, 1948–1986.M 0497. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Starks was born in Birmingham, Alabama. She moved to Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, in 1972 and married John Wesley Starks that same year. She has been involved with the Gamma Phi Delta sorority and the Fort Wayne Women's Bureau. She has been a staff writer for the Indiana University Purdue University at Fort Wayne campus newspaper. The collection is a combination of various materials from six women of the Fort Wayne area, collected in the Black Women in the Middle West Project by Deborah Starks. The women are Starks, Maddy Bruce, C. Maxine Hall, Corrine Brooks, Genois Wilson, and Marjorie Wickliffe. The collection contains letters, short stories, poems, clippings, church bulletins, awards, and an oral history transcription. Part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project.


STECKER, ELLYN.  Papers, 1978-1999.  M 0785. 8 document cases, 1 box of color photographs, slides, artifacts. Collection guide online. EllynStecker, a South Bend, Ind., physician, was co-chairperson for the National Organization for Women (NOW), St. Joseph Valley (Indiana) Chapter from ca. 1985 to the late 1990s. She was also an editor of Around the Bend, the newsletter of the Peace Education Fund of Indiana, Inc. The collection includes records of the National Organization for Women, St. Joseph Valley (Indiana) Chapter. A large amount of material concerns the struggle between anti-abortion groups and organizations that advocate access to abortion and family planning services. Also included are subject files regarding aging, the Gulf War, minimum wage legislation, and lesbian issues. Other material includes issues of the newsletter Around the Bend.


STEELE, THEODORE CLEMENT AND MARY LAKIN STEELE. Papers, 1869–1966.M 0464. 2 boxes. Collection guide online.  Theodore Clement Steele (1847–1926) was born in Owen County, Indiana, the son of Samuel Hamilton Steele and Harriett Newell Evans. In 1870 he married, near Rushville, Rush County, Indiana, Mary Elizabeth Lakin (ca. 1850–1899), a daughter of Adam Simmons Lakin and Mary Cloud Matson. Mary Lakin Steele maintained the family home throughout their many moves stateside and abroad and took a helpful interest in her husband's career. She was active in the Portfolio Club in Indianapolis before which she read (1893) a paper, "Impressions," about her years in Munich. The collection includes correspondence of Mary Lakin Steele, of which many letters concern her husband's work. One series of letters, written from Germany, describe the domestic situation, social contacts, and her husband's studies. Other letters describe Mrs. Steele's trips to Kansas to visit with family.


STEELE, THEODORE L. Papers, 1868–1913.M 0263, BV 2471–2474. 4 boxes, 4 volumes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-351.  This collection contains papers of the McKay, Nicholson, and Steele families of Indianapolis. Included in the collection are real estate records (1868–1909), correspondence concerning women's suffrage (1878–81), theater handbills, and personal account books.


STEPHENSON-McCAULEY. Family Papers, 1862-1952. M 0766. 1 box. Collection guide online. The collection includes 55 letters written primarily by James H. and Jerry E. Stephenson to their sister Nan McCauley (nee Stephenson) of Kosciusko County, Indiana. The letters discuss Civil War troop movements, camp life, religion, and dedication to duty. Also included is a letter from Eliza Stephenson to Nan McCauley. Stephenson is homesick after leaving Warsaw, Indiana to live Council Bluff, Iowa.  Other material includes legal documents and correspondence concerning a lawsuit filed by Sarah Johnston of Warsaw, Indiana.  The lawsuit concerns the discharge of Sarah’s late husband, Dr. John H. Long, during the Civil War.


STILLSON, BLANCHE. Papers, 1911–1976.M 0466, BV 2248. 4 boxes, 1 volume. Collection guide online.  Artist, author, and cultural leader, Stillson taught art and painting at Indianapolis colleges and high schools and was the author of Wings (1945). Her woodcuts and paintings appeared at numerous shows and in various publications. She was a board member and trustee of the Art Association of Indianapolis. The collection contains personal letters from friends of a general and professional nature; copies of woodcuts and other art works; correspondence from publishers and readers regarding Wings, as well as reviews, manuscript copy, and page proofs of the book.


STOUT, MARTHA. Papers, 1834–1936.M 0265. 1 box.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-356.  Stout was a schoolteacher in Greenwood, Johnson County, and wife of Harvey S. Jaques, a schoolteacher and storeowner in Whitcomb, Franklin County. The collection consists of Stout's correspondence with family, friends, and Harvey Jaques during the time she was teaching school; letters from Franklin County soldiers serving in the Civil War; her correspondence with her children and other family members from the 1890s to the 1910s; and receipts, bills, and other financial and legal documents.


STREIGHT FAMILY. Collection, ca. 1850-ca. 1945.P 0332. 1 folder. Collection guide in library. Lovina Streight (d. 1910) was married to Brigadier General Abel D. Streight (ca. 1828-1892) of Indianapolis. She accompanied her husband and 75,000 Union army troops on a march from Stevenson, Alabama to Nashville, Tennessee. She witnessed several battles, nursed the sick and dying on the battlefield and in field hospitals. Confederate troops apparently captured her three times, twice exchaning her for prisoners. She reportedly escaped imprisonment a third time by branshing a gun hidden in her skirts. Collection includes 10 black-and-hite prints and 9 cellulose acetate negatives of portraits of Abel D. Straight, Lovina Streight, and other family members.


STREIGHTOFF, FRANK HATCH. Papers, 1894–1948.M 0267. 8 boxes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-357.  The collection includes the papers of Frances Doan Streightoff (1885–1969), an Indianapolis civic leader and president of the Marion County League of Women Voters. She co-authored Indiana: A Social and Economic Survey (1910) with her husband.


TAFLINGER, ELMER.Papers,1890–1980.  M 0698, OMB 069, CT 0786–0787.  27 boxes, 2 cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  This collection includes correspondence and material relating to Coral Oleva (Taflinger) Black (1894–1978), sister of Indiana artist Elmer Taflinger.  The correspondence includes letters written by Coral Taflinger to her parents while she was in college or while she and her husband were traveling.  Other material relating to Coral includes school items and scrapbooks.  Coral graduated from Manual Training High School and Columbia University Teacher’s College.  She worked for Indianapolis Public Schools for 51 years as a history teacher at Manual and as principal at School #15.  She was the first recipient of the Taflinger Award given by the Indianapolis Art League Foundation.  Other material related to women in this collection includes letters between Elmer E. Taflinger long-time girlfriend Jessica Daube, and letters to Elmer Taflinger from "Marcelle" and Mary Ellis.


TALBERT, MARTHA WHITE. Diaries, 1845–1879. M 0275. 1 box.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-363.  Talbert was a member of the Society of Friends in Westfield, Hamilton County, and Minneapolis, Minnesota, and wife of physician Aaron B. Talbert. The collection consists of Talbert's diaries recording her life in Westfield and Minnesota, including accounts of Quaker meetings and antislavery activities.


TARKINGTON, SUSANAH. Papers, 1898–1932.M 0411. 1 box. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-366.  Tarkington, born Susanah Kiefer in Dayton, Ohio, married writer Booth Tarkington in 1912. The collection consists of her diaries for the years 1898, when she was a young woman in Dayton; 1913, shortly after she married Tarkington; 1925, when the Tarkingtons toured Europe and North Africa; and 1929–32.


TAYLOR, LELIA KERN. Scrapbook, 1925.BV 1747. 1 volume.  Collection guide in library.  Lelia Kern Taylor was the daughter of David G. Kern of Indianapolis. She married Dr. James H. Taylor of Greencastle, Putnam County, Indiana. Taylor was associated with the Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, the Indianapolis Free Kindergarten and Children's Aid Society, and the Propylaeum Club. She served on the City Plan and Zoning Board of Indianapolis. The scrapbook contains material regarding her career on the City Plan Board and her activities with the DAR.


TAYLOR, MARY LYON. Negatives, 1906-ca. 1910.  P 0178. 30 boxes negatives, 1 box prints. Collection guide in library. Mary Lyon Taylor (1872-1956) was a pictorialist portrait photographer. She operated a home portraiture business from her home (1941 N. Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis) from ca. 1906 to ca. 1910. Her subjects were largely members of Indianapolis’ upper class, including James Whitcomb Riley and the Bobbs, Woollen, Lilly, and Nicholson families. This collection contains glass plate negatives and 121 modern prints.


TAYLOR, MARY LYON.Collection, 1870-1980.  P 0281. 260 photographs, 1 box of manuscript material. Collection guide in library. Mary Lyon Taylor (1872-1956) was a pictorialist portrait photographer. She operated a home portraiture business from her home (1941 N. Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis) from ca. 1906 to ca. 1910. Her subjects were largely members of Indianapolis’ upper-class, including James Whitcomb Riley and the Bobbs, Woollen, Lilly, and Nicholson families. The photographs in this collection include vintage portraits made by Taylor ca. 1906-ca. 1910. Also included are snapshots of the Taylor homes in Indianapolis, near Noblesville, and at Lake Maxinkuckee, Indiana.  Non-photographic material includes correspondence, short stories and poetry, sheet music and lyrics, reminiscences, and genealogy created by Mary Lyon Taylor and other members of her family.


TEMONEY, RUTH. Collection, 1891–1985.M 0604. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Temoney, an educator, was coordinator for the Black Women in the Middle West Project in Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana. The collection includes materials such as biographical information on African American women activists and data on clubs, churches, and other organizations which Temoney gathered for the project.


THOMAS, ANNE BUTLER. Papers, 1880–1925.BV 2025–2033. 9 volumes.  Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-367.  Thomas was the daughter of educator Ovid Butler of Indianapolis and wife of David Owen Thomas of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The collection includes Thomas's diaries (1880–84) and letter books (1881–85) regarding her social life, education, and experiences with suitors at Vassar College, New York, and Indianapolis. There is also a diary of her trip to Japan, India, and Sri Lanka [Ceylon] (1924–25).


THORPE, LAURA THOMAS. Memoirs, ca. 1909–1911.SC 1541.2 folders. Collection guide online.  Laura Thomas was born in Silver Lake, Indiana, in 1856. In 1861 her family moved to Iowa, then back to Silver Lake two years later, then to Nebraska in 1869. In 1877 Thomas married Edmund S. Thorpe in Glen Allen, Missouri. The collection consists of a memoir notebook by Thorpe, and a typescript transcription by Ralph Helsel. The memoir covers the years 1859 to 1875, and seems to have been written ca. 1909–1911. Described are family events; moves to Iowa, Indiana, and Nebraska; her father's enlistment in the Civil War; and her first teaching positions.  The transcription includes an 1875 letter from Thorpe in Nebraska to her grandparents.


TINSLEY, ALICE D. Collection, 1962–1985. M 0537, OM 0334. 1 box, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Alice D. Coleman Tinsley, the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. George Coleman, Sr., was reared in New Orleans. In 1946 she married Charles H. Tinsley of Indianapolis. She was instrumental in the 1965 formation of the Indiana Association for the Multiply Handicapped Deaf (known since 1985 as the Indiana State Association for the Multiple Handicapped and Sensory Impaired). The content of this collection reflects Tinsley's dedication to, and work for, the multiple handicapped in Indiana.


TITUS, CHARLES H. Letters, 1836–1848.SC 1862. 3 folders. No collection guide available.  This collection contains family correspondence to Charles H. Titus from his wife's family. Letters are from Isaac Dunn, Gilbert Dunn, and Harriet Dunn Larrabee, proprietor of the Greencastle Female Collegiate Seminary. The letters contain family news and news of the seminary.


TOWNE, MARIAN K. Papers, ca. 1974–1996.  M 0746.  12 boxes.  Collection guide online.  Marian (Kleinsasser) Towne was born in Freeman, South Dakota, in 1933.  She graduated from Bethel College in 1955 and received master’s degrees in both 1958 and 1978.  Towne’s teaching career spans the years 1955–94, with the later part of her career as a part-time instructor at Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis.  She has been active in many civic, service, and church organizations.  Materials in this collection—correspondence, articles and clippings, political campaign materials—focus on Towne’s involvement in women’s rights issues.


TOWNER, HARRIET C. Letters, 1848–1850.SC 1466. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Harriet C. Towner (Mrs. James) was lighthouse keeper at Michigan City, La Porte County, Indiana, in 1850. The collection contains two letters that Towner wrote to her son, Daniel Coit Towner, while a student at Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts.


TRUSLER, SARAH SIMPSON. Notebook, ca. l850–1890.BV 2615. 1 volume. Collection guide online.  This collection consists of a scrapbook kept by Trusler (ca. 1830–90) with newspaper poems and momentos of political experiences of her husband, Gilbert (1830–1883), and brothers-in-law, Milton (1825–1906) and Nelson (1823–1880) Trusler.


TUCKER, ROBINA SHARPE. Autobiography, 1848–1927.M 0278. 1 box.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-372.  Tucker was prominent in Indianapolis society and wife of Hannibal Smith Tucker, founder of the Tucker Glove Company in Indianapolis. The autobiography concentrates on her early years growing up and attending school in Indianapolis during the 1850s and 1860s, visiting Missouri in the mid-1850s, and participating in Indianapolis social life in the 1860s and 1870s.


TUTEWILER, HENRY W. Family Papers,1859–1920.  M 0279, OM 0394.  1 box, 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  The collection is comprised of Tutewiler family documents, including Civil War correspondence between Henry W. Tutewiler and his fiancιe, Louisa M. Dunn.


VAWTER, JENNIE. Diary, 1868–1879.SC 2444. 2 folders. Collection guide online.  Jennie Vawter was born in 1846 and lived in Ripley County, Indiana, ca. 1860–80. She married John M. Vawter, also of Ripley County, in 1868. The diary in this collection mentions church, social activities, and family.


WALHEISER, MARY SUSAN. Papers, ca. 1938. SC 2305. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Mary Susan Walheiser, born 1891 in Bedford, Indiana, attended Western College in Oxford, Ohio, Purdue University, and Bedford Business College. During World War I she enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served as a yeoman 3rd and 2nd class in the Navy Department. This collection consists of a card mounted with two photographs of Walheiser, one in mufti and one in uniform, and a typed biographical sketch.


WALKER, BERNICE. Collection, 1931–1984.M 0541. 6 boxes. Collection guide in library.  Bernice Walker (1905– ), a resident of Indianapolis, was born in Anderson, Indiana. She attended Bookwood College in New York, majoring in industrial relations and psychology. Walker worked for Wainwright Music Camp, the Fort Benjamin Harrison Army Finance Center, and the Internal Revenue Service. The collection contains biographical material; correspondence; and materials related to the Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Indianapolis, women's missionary societies; Alpha Pi Chi sorority (a national service organization). the Phyllis Wheatley YWCA, and other organizations. Part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project.


WALKER, MADAM C. J. Collection, 1910–1980.M 0399, OMB 0022, BV 2667–2678. 126 boxes, 12 volumes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-390.  Businesswoman. Madam C. J. (Sarah Breedlove) Walker was a laundress in St. Louis (1880s–90s); and manufacturer and seller of hair products for black women in St. Louis, Denver, Pittsburgh, and Indianapolis. Her business was incorporated as the Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company in Indianapolis (1911). She was an owner of a factory in Indianapolis, director of a nationwide network of agents and beauty schools, and a prominent black philanthropist. The collection consists of records and correspondence of the Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company and its principal officers. The collection also includes the correspondence and business papers of Madam Walker and A'Lelia Walker Robinson.


WALLACE, LEW. Collection, 1799–1972.M 0292, OMB 0023, F 0370–0380, F 0643–0654, F 0805–0809, F 1123–1124. 26 boxes, 30 microfilm reels. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-391.  Included in the collection are the letters of Susan Elston Wallace (1830–1907), wife of Lew Wallace, a Civil War general, diplomat, and author, consisting of family correspondence, letters to her son from Europe, Turkey, and Egypt, and correspondence with publishers regarding her own writings.


WALSER, ETTA. Diary, 1900. SC 2629.1 item. Collection guide online.  Walser was probably a young girl who lived near Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana; her family rented rooms to boarders. The diary kept by Etta Walser for the year 1900 contains references to a W.A. and William Ley. The diary describes school and church events, daily family activities, and visitors. Following the diary are treatments for bee stings, burns, and consumption.


WALTERS, JOANN. Papers, 1972–1993.M 0150. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Joann Walters grew up in Orange County, Indiana. After 1975 she moved to Indianapolis. The collection contains a wide variety of correspondence, dealing with issues faced by women in the last quarter of the twentieth century.


WATERS, PHYLLIS WHEATLEY. Collection, 1910–1971.M 0589. 2 boxes. Collection guide in library.  Phyllis Wheatley Waters (ca. 1898–1973) was a native of West Virginia who lived most of her life in Indiana. She received a BA in French from the University of Michigan in 1917. Following graduation, she headed up the Language Department at West Virginia State University. One year later she began employment with the Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS). She received a Masters degree from Butler University and taught at Crispus Attucks High School and School #17, retiring in 1968 after 48 years. Waters was a precinct committeewoman and ward chairman, who ran unsuccessfully for the state legislature in 1960. Active in Republican Party politics, she served out an unexpired term on the Indianapolis City Council in 1967. The collection includes biographical information about Waters and correspondence dating from 1910 to 1971. Much of the correspondence is written between Waters and family members, most notably Phil Waters, her father. There are about a dozen letters (dated from 1910 to 1922) addressed to Phyllis W. Waters from journalist T. Thomas Fortune. Signing his letters "Uncle Tim," Fortune offers advice to Waters, often writing from the offices of the Washington Eagle and Nolfolk Journal and Guide.


WEATHERFORD, RUBY M. Papers, 1904–1970.M 0791, OM 0403. 4 document cases, 1 folder negatives, 8 cellulose acetate negatives. Collection guide online. Ruby Mae (Buchanan) Weatherford (1889–1970) was born in Hicks, near Madison, Ind., the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Jane Means Buchanan. She married Ira V. J. T. Weatherford (d. 1968) on 17 August 1907 and the union bore twelve children. Ruby Weatherford was a homemaker, and also sold farm products and taught music to supplement the family income. In the late 1920s she wrote advertising jingles for local businesses. She began writing poetry around 1925. A number of her works were published in local newspapers over the years. The collection primarily consists of typescripts and drafts of original poems, fiction, and lyrics. The material is arranged in three series: Series 1: Poetry, Lyrics, and Fiction; Series 2: Buchanan and Weatherford Families; and Series 3: Pendleton and Anderson.


WEATHERS, MARGARET R. Papers, 1945.OM 0200. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Document certifying Weathers as a probation officer, 29 November 1945.


WEBB FAMILY. Correspondence, 1861-1878. SC 2639. 2 folders. Collection guide online. This collection consists of correspondence written or received by members of the Webb family, who were residents of Orange County and Washington County in Indiana. The majority is between Mary Ann Webb and Thomas S.W. Hawkins, a soldier in the 38th Indiana Regiment. Mary Ann Webb (fl. 1861–1878) was a resident of Saltilloville, Indiana (Washington Co.) for a time. She was the daughter of Isaac H. and Elizabeth (Lawrence) Webb. She married Dr. T. Volney Gifford at an undetermined date. Dr. Gifford operated a sanitarium in New London (Howard Co.).


WEDDLE, NOAH S. Papers.  1864-1923, 1995.  M 0678, OM 0361.  1 box, 2 folders.  Collection guide online.  The collection includes four letters written between Weddle and his wife, Cordelia Ann Brown, between January and June 1865.


WELLER FAMILY. Papers, 1861-1979. M 0713, OM 0380. 2 boxes, 1 folder. Collection guide online. Weller family records contained in the collection include correspondence, records, and general items of the Weller family, including Mary Emswiler Weller. Also included in the papers is an 1880 diary kept by Cora L. Pearce of Williamsburg (Wayne County), Indiana, and Mary Weller's real estate related receipts and financial records (1909–19.)


WERLE, AUDREY C. , Research notes on Indiana African–American History, 1980–1990.  M 0792.2 document cases. Collection guide online.Audrey Lucking Werle (29 October 1926– ), was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio.  She graduated from Ursuline Academy in 1945 and in 1951 married William C. Werle. Werle first became interested in African-American history while helping her son, Josι, with a school assignment about the Underground Railroad. During the early 1970s her interest was further cultivated by the Human Relations Council in Jefferson County and a cross-culture course she took at Spalding College.  Using her genealogical skills, she was commissioned the Indiana State Library Genealogy Division during the 1980s to develop a name index of Indiana blacks and mulattoes appearing in the 1870 federal census. She developed a card index that was placed at the Indiana State Library and microfilmed by the Church of the Latter Day Saints. The collection consists of Werle’s research notes on the history of African Americans in Indiana. The materials reflect Werle’s experience as a family history researcher.  From her use of various research tools (census and cemetery records, deed books, photographs, and secondary sources), she identified family names, institutions, and geographical areas that relate to the history of African Americans in in this state.


WESTBAY, DOROTHY. Papers, 1934–1937.OMB 0040. 1 box. Collection guide online.  The collection consists of one scrapbook containing clippings, programs, notes, and other memorabilia from Westbay's student years, 1934–37, at Arsenal Technical High School, Indianapolis.


WHITE-PETTIJOHN FAMILY Papers, 1858–1988.SC 2379. 7 folders. Collection guide online.  The Whites were early Quaker settlers in Westfield, Hamilton County, Indiana. The collection includes family correspondence primarily of Jose White (1858–59) and Alpha White (1899–1900) and a booklet of family reminiscences.


WHITESIDE, BIRDIE L. Collection, 1944–1986.M 0658. 4 boxes. Collection guide online.  Birdie Mary Lee Whiteside, a native of Kentucky, was educated at Simmons University in Louisville. In 1953 she founded the Guiding Light Christian Service, a tape ministry designed to provide recordings of sermons to the sick and shut-in. The collection, part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project, includes nine scrapbooks filled with correspondence, photographs, programs, and other materials pertaining to her work with Guiding Light Christian Service, Inc.


WILDER, ELOISE. Short story, 1878.SC 1756. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  This collection contains a humorous short story, "The Weepin' Widder," written by Eloise Wilder in 1878.


WILDHACK, MARGARET JAMESON. Papers, 1965.OM 0319. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Margaret J. Wildhack was born in Indianapolis, the daughter of Donald and Margaret Jameson. During World War II she served in the WAVES. After the war she married William Wildhack, a reporter for the Indianapolis News. During the 1960s Wildhack wrote a column, "Society and How It Grew," for the Indianapolis News. Copies of the articles Wildhack wrote for the Indianapolis News form this collection.


WILLIAMS, GAAR-BLANCHE STILLSON. Letters, 1920–1935.SC 2294. 3 folders. Collection guide in library.  Gaar Williams (1881–1935), cartoonist and illustrator, was born in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, the son of George R. Williams. He attended Cincinnati Art Academy and the Chicago Art Institute. He married Magdalena (Lena) Englebert. Blanche Stillson (1889–1977), artist, author, and cultural leader, was born in Indianapolis, graduated from DePauw University, 1911, and attended the John Herron School of Art in Indianapolis. She taught art and painting at Herron-IU-Indianapolis (now IUPUI), Butler University, and Shortridge High School. This collection contains letters written to Blanche Stillson by Gaar and Lena Williams.


WILLIAMS, HERBERT. Collection, 1826–1893.SC 1581, BV 0087a–c. 2 folders, 3 volumes. No collection guide available. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-398.  Williams (1795–1867) was a farmer in Brooklyn, Connecticut, and Michigan City, La Porte County, Indiana. In this collection is an account, "Glimpses of My Mother's Life" (1893), by Williams's daughter, Ellen, giving an account of her mother's life in Massachusetts and Connecticut prior to relocating to Indiana in 1836.


WILLIAMS, LUCILLE LUCAS. Collection, 1915–1982.M 0449. 9 boxes. Collection guide in library.  Williams, a longtime resident of Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, was a businesswoman and social services director. The collection materials relate to her many and varied personal and professional activities. Some of the organizations for which materials may be found are the Shafer African Methodist Episcopal Church; Church Women United; National Association of Colored Women's Clubs; Order of Eastern Star; Munsyana Day Nursery; and Action, Inc. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


WILLIAMS, MARY DEAN. Papers, 1850–1986.M 0460, OM 0181. 1 box, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Mary Dean Williams (ca. 1902–1990) was born in Geneva, Shelby County, Indiana. She graduated from business college and held several related jobs. After her marriage in 1925 she was also a homemaker and mother. The collection includes correspondence, memoirs, and a scrapbook.


WILLSON, LAURA V. Letter, 1837.SC 1588. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Laura Willson wrote from Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, 2 July 1837, to Jane B. Shirley in Louisville, Kentucky, describing religious and educational aspects of life in Crawfordsville.


WILSON, FLORABELLE WILLIAMS. Collection, 1910–1995. M 0731. 1.5 boxes. Collection guide online.  Florabelle Williams Wilson , educator and librarian, was born in Indianapolis in 1927. She attended Crispus Attucks High School and received a BS in Education from Indiana Central University (now University of Indianapolis) in 1949. She taught at Indianapolis Public School #23 for eight years. In 1961, she received an MLS from Indiana University. She married John A. Wilson in 1964. From 1957 to 1971 Wilson worked as an assistant librarian at Indiana Central University, then as director of the library from 1971 until her retirement in 1982. The first full-time African American faculty member at Indiana Central University, she was also the first black director of an academic library in Indiana. This collection includes material that she collected from various sources over a period of time. Much of the collection pertains to Indianapolis African American individuals and families, churches, and organizations.


WILSON, LIZZIE. Poems, 1852–1853.SC 1589. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  This collection contains a number of poems written by Lizzie Wilson, probably a resident of Hendricks County, Indiana.


WILSON, PHOEBE SNAVELLY. Papers, ca. 1926–1930. SC 2649. 6 folders, 1 folder of visual material. Collection guide in library.  Phoebe Snavelly Wilson (fl. 1926–1950) was a resident of Wabash, Indiana. She was an officer of the Wabash province of the Tri Kappa Kappa sorority. Wilson also lived in Birmingham, Alabama (ca. 1930–1931) and Mansfield, Ohio. She was married to Donald Frank Wilson. This collection consists of two poetry notebooks (ca. 1926–1950) kept by Phoebe Wilson. They contain typescript and manuscript copies of poems; correspondence from Mary Chase Cornelius of Birmingham, Alabama, and Edith Mirick, editor of Star-dust, A Journal of Poetry (Washington, D.C.); academic notes on poetry; newspaper clippings; and Wilson's business pamphlets.


WINANS, LILLY. Memoirs, 1922–1934.SC 1592. 2 folders.  Collection guide in library.  "Our Sunday Trip(s) 1922–1934," written by Lilly Winans, records weekly automobile jaunts taken by Ben and Lilly Winans and other Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana, residents to surrounding Indiana and Ohio counties, Cincinnati, and the Ohio River.


WINANT, ANN E. Letter, 1945.SC 1593 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Ann E. Winant, a captain, served as a nurse in the 9th F. D. Hospital during World War II. This collection contains one letter written by Winant, 2 February 1945, in Belgium to Mary E. Woodhead and others in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana.


WINPENNY, ELLEN ELIZABETH. Scrapbook, 1861–1908.SC 1594. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  Winpenny was an artist and inventor. Materials in the scrapbook include clippings, information on art exhibits, patent papers, and genealogy.


WOLFOLK, LAURA J. Collection, 1918–1981.M 0535. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Laura J. Wolfolk (1882–1977) was born in Greencastle, Putnam County, Indiana, the daughter of Private Taylor and Rhoda Wolfolk. An educator, Wolfolk taught for forty years in the Indianapolis Public School system. This collection contains materials relating to Wolfolk's career and social activities.


WOOD, BARBARA. Collection, 1864–1900.SC 2333. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  This collection consists of a 1916 Republican postcard, photographs, and letters written to and from various family members (1864–1900). The letters include family (Arnold, Conan, and Dicks) and local (Danville, Illinois, Richmond and Lafayette, Indiana) news.


WOODWARD, ALBERTA DAVIS. Papers, 1906–1929.M 0544, BV 2504, OM 0228. 1 box, 1 volume, 1 folder. Collection guide in library.  Alberta Davis Woodward was born about 1906 and graduated, as Jean Davis, from Shortridge High School in 1925. Later she attended Columbia University. She was interested in journalism and wrote a murder mystery under the pseudonym of Davis Woodward. The collection contains Woodward's senior graduation memory book; class papers and assignments; two diplomas; and a draft of a murder mystery "Murder in the Col."


YACKLEY, RAY.Letters,1941–1945.  M 0730.  2 boxes.  Collection guide in library.  The collection includes wartime correspondence between Theola "Dodie" Werstler Yackley and her fiancι and later husband Ray Yackley.  Topics include news of family and friends, and attempting to get married during a furlough.  Other material includes letters to Ray from his sisters Mary and Elizabeth Yackley in Mishawaka, Indiana; and letters to Theola from Betty White, an army nurse stationed in Texas and Mississippi (1944–45).  Theola Yackley apparently grew up in Pierceton, Kosciusko County, Indiana. and moved to South Bend prior to 1941.  During World War II she worked on an assembly line in a South Bend factory.


YORE, MARY D. Collection, 1918–1985.M 0542. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Mary Donna Baker Blake Yore, the daughter of Franklin L. and Nellie Cook Baker, was born and grew up in Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana. Yore, active in collecting her family history, has served as editor of the Baker-Cook family newsletter, Family Lines. This collection, part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project, includes genealogical materials. documents, correspondence, newsletters, and photographs of the Baker family.


YOUNTS, BEVERLY. Papers, 1872–1974.M 0602. 1 box. Collection guide online.  This collection contains correspondence (1872–1974), most of it concerning Beverly and Charles Younts, material on Richmond city government, and historical material about Centerville and Salisbury. Also included is a journal (1909–45) of Minnie Stivers.


ZEIGLER, SARAH P. Scrapbook, ca. 1880–1996.M 0683. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Sarah Parham Zeigler (1902–1996), the daughter of Charles and Lillie Alexander Parham, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1938 she married P. Hobson Zeigler. Zeigler received a Bachelor of Arts and a Master's of Science from Butler University. She spent her professional life as an educator in the Indianapolis school system. Materials in this collection relate to Zeigler's professional life and activities. Of note are materials relating to Eleanor Roosevelt's 1953 visit to Indianapolis and correspondence Zeigler had with Roosevelt.


ZIMMER, BARBARA. Papers, 1969; 1980–81.M 0027. 1 box. Collection guide online.  This collection includes correspondence, drafts and finished reports, memos, and programs from the period 1969; 1980–81, relating to activities of Barbara Zimmer, an Indianapolis educator, with the Indiana Board of Education and League of Women Voters.

Organizations and Projects


A LOOK BACK AT THE HOME LAWN SANITARIUM. IHRG Project, 1995-1996.  SC 2605.  5 folders.  Collection guide online.  This oral history project was part of an Indiana Heritage Research Grant (#95-3029) awarded to the Morgan County Historic Preservation Society in 1995.  The collection includes typescripts of interviews and a bound volume of A Look Back at the Home Lawn Sanitarium.  People interviewed for the project included relatives of owners, physicians and upper-level employees of Home Lawn, kitchen workers, porters, and other employees, and neighbors of the sanitarium.  Topics include: activities at Home Lawn, owners and employees, and famous visitors.  The interviewees include: Kay Kennedy Branch, Alma Fraker, Joyce Hamilton, Mary Lib Hendricks, Rosemary Hendricks, Marilyn Kennedy, Louise Kent, Dorothy Norman, and Ruth Scott.


ALPHALATREIAN CLUB. Records, 1924–1989.M 0525, BV 2655, OM 0294. 2 boxes, 1 volume, 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The Alpha Latreian Club was founded in 1924 in Indianapolis as a service organization for college-educated women. It is a member of the Indiana Federation of Clubs and the General Federation of Women's Clubs. The collection consists of administrative records, minutes, treasurer reports, and attendance and membership lists, as well as correspondence and financial information relating to the Jameson Camp.


AMERICAN RED CROSS, INDIANAPOLIS AREA CHAPTER. Records, 1916–1978.M0551, F1090–108. 1 box, 19 microfilm reels. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-7.  The Indianapolis Area Chapter of the American Red Cross was formed on 19 July 1916 with William Fortune as president, the Reverend Francis H. Gavisk as vice president, John H. Holliday as treasurer, and Guernsey Van Riser as secretary. This largely volunteer agency is concerned primarily with assisting disaster victims. It also provides assistance to the military during times of armed conflict and provides home nursing, first aid, and nutritional information and education. Through the years many Hoosier women have volunteered their services with the Red Cross. The collection includes scrapbooks, correspondence, publications, annual reports, and organizational information.


ARSENAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL Oral History Project, 1919–1963.BV 2635–2637. 3 volumes. Collection guide online.  Transcripts of interviews with graduates of Arsenal Technical High School from the classes of 1915 through 1963.


BERTHA ESTHER BALLARD HOME ASSOCIATION. Records, 1889–1975.M 0329, BV 1846–1855. 4 boxes, 10 volumes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-31.  The Bertha Ballard Home was founded in 1890 by the Women Friends of Western Yearly Meeting as a Christian boarding house for young working women in Indianapolis. Originally named the Friends Boarding House for Girls, the home incorporated under the name Bertha Ballard Home Association in 1900 in response to a donation by William H. Ballard. It was operated as a nonprofit organization until it closed in 1975. The collection consists of the minutes of the board of directors meetings for the Friends Boarding House (1889–95) and the Bertha Ballard Home (1900–73); financial records; and miscellaneous letters, legal documents, and clippings.


BLACK WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE WEST- Miscellaneous, 1890–1984.M 0499, OM 0301. 1 box, 2 folders. Collection guide online.  This is an artificial collection of miscellaneous small groups of records collected during the Black Women in the Middle West Project. Of particular note are the materials relating to Helen Whitelow and the founding of the Soul People Repertory Company, the Indiana State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs, and Indianapolis churches.


BLACK WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE WEST PROJECT. Records, 1932-1986.M 0530. 14 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Black Women in the Middle West Project was a collecting effort to gather primary source materials of African American women in Illinois and Indiana. The project was directed by Darlene Clark Hine, a Purdue University history professor and vice provost, with assistance from Patrick Bidelman, also of Purdue University. Records from the project, conducted in three phases from 1977 to 1985, are located in five repositories: the Indiana Historical Society, Calumet Regional Archives, Northern Indiana Historical Society, the Chicago Historical Society, and the Illinois Historical Society. This collection represents the administrative files of the project and includes biographical materials of project participants, planning documents, financial records, and general correspondence.


CADETS OF TEMPERANCE. Records, 1854–1855.SC 0167. 1 folder. No collection guide available.  The Cadets of Temperance, Section No. 43, was organized on 9 August 1854 in Huntsville, Randolph County, Indiana, by several members of the local Sons of Temperance. Female members were admitted 17 February 1855. The collection includes minutes of regular meetings from 9 August 1854 through 19 May 1855.


CAMP FIRE GIRLS OF CENTRAL INDIANA. Records, 1913–1988.M 0526, OMB 0038, F 1109–1118. 23 boxes, 10 microfilm reels. Collection guide in library.  The Camp Fire Girls was started by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick and his wife Charlotte Vetter Gulick in 1910 and was incorporated in 1912. The Indianapolis Camp Fire Girls traces its origins to 1911, when Eleanor Putnam, wife of a Butler University professor, formed a group with about fifteen girls from Downey Avenue Christian Church. The first council was chartered in 1914. The Central Indiana Council of Camp Fire, Inc., was officially dissolved in l988. The records consist of meeting minutes, record books of activities and projects, reports, membership fees, photographs, scrapbooks, and publications of Camp Fire Girls, Inc., of Central Indiana.


CATHARINE MERRILL CLUB. Records, ca. 1986.SC 2551. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The Catharine Merrill Club was founded in Indianapolis in 1885 in honor of Indianapolis resident Catharine Merrill, daughter of Indiana politician Samuel Merrill. Catharine Merrill was a teacher, nurse, professor, and clubwoman. The collection contains a yearbook, two club papers, and a photograph of an 1885 portrait of Catharine Merrill by noted Indiana artist T. C. Steele.


CHRISTIAN PARK WOMEN’S CLUB (INDIANAPOLIS, IND). Records, 1935–1988. M 0779 2 document cases, artifacts. Collection guide online.  The Christian Park Women’s Club was established on 19 February 1935.  Twenty women met in the Christian Park Community House and held elections to decide who would hold office.  Mrs. E.J. Reinhardt was elected the first president of the organization.  A constitution was written that year, and was revised in 1938. The club’s objective was to “further recreation activity and to promote or aid any project of vital interest to the Christian Park community.” Club activities included sewing dressings and pads for the local cancer agencies and layettes for hospital nurseries. In the 1940s the group ent charitable goods to the soldiers at Fort Harrison, served lunches to navy enlistees at the federal building, and furnished a room for the wounded being cared for at Camp Atterbury.  During this period they joined the Riley Hospital Cheer Guild, naming their chapter “Even as a Child.” 


CHURCH AND COMMUNITY: ST. LAWRENCE PARISH (1895-1930s). 1995. M 0686. 1 box. Collection guide online.The collection is the final grant report on the St. Lawrence Project, and contains a grant abstract, oral history interview questions, a list of interviewees, typescript transcripts of interviews, and copies of interview essays. Topics include the ethnic and economic make-up of the parish; the affiliated church and school; religious societies and activities; the Ku Klux Klan; the Great Depression; and World War II. Thirty women were interviewed for the project.


CHURCH WOMEN UNITED IN INDIANA. Records, 1933–1988.M 0547, BV 2687, BV 2689. 4 boxes, 2 volumes. Collection guide in library.  The Indiana Council of Church Women was formed in 1929. During the ensuing years it affiliated and reorganized numerous times. In 1924 as part of the national organization, United Church Women, it became the United Church Women of Indiana and in 1966 Church Women United. The collection consists of annual reports, scrapbooks, newsletters, yearbooks, brochures, pamphlets, and correspondence. Records of the state president of Church Women United (1970–79) and histories of each county chapter are also included.


CHURCH WOMEN UNITED IN INDIANA. Records, 1916–1998.  M 0738, OMB 0078.  30 boxes, 2 oversize boxes.  Collection guide online.  The Indiana Council of Church Women was formed in 1929.  During the ensuing years it affiliated and reorganized numerous times.  In 1924 as part of the national organization, United Church Women, it became the United Church Women of Indiana and in 1966 Church Women United.  The collection comprises the records of the Church Women United for Indianapolis and Indiana and is divided into three series based on the source of the acquisition.  Series I contains the records from the Indianapolis council and was housed with those of the Church Federation of Indianapolis.  Included among the records are meeting minutes and correspondence; financial records; and programs.  Also contained in this series are scrapbooks, newsclippings and other printed holdings relating to the historical activities of the organization; yearbooks listing members for both the Indianapolis and Indiana groups; and newsletters for the local, state, and national associations.  Series II centers around correspondence and printed materials collected by Indianapolis council president's Billie Watkins and Jane Fribley, 1973–1995.  Items include correspondence, meeting minutes, publications, and scrapbooks. Series III mainly contains records of the Indiana council (1953–1998) and includes board minutes, newsletters, and information regarding local areas and units throughout the state.


CITIZENS FORUM, INC. Records, 1962–1985.M 0425, CT 704–712. 12 boxes, 10 audiocassette tapes, photographs, and artifacts. Collection guide online.  Citizens Forum was founded in Indianapolis in 1964 by Mattie Coney to get an open housing ordinance passed. Originating as a "Better Neighbor Program," Citizens Forum expanded into an interracial, interfaith, nonpolitical organization. Its goals included improved health, safety and beauty of neighborhoods, and instilling a sense of responsibility, pride, and good conduct and citizenship. Mattie Coney, a retired school teacher, became the group's executive director; her husband, Elmo Coney, became the projects director. The Coneys provided the organization with the guidance and impetus needed to insure its success for twenty years. The collection contains organizational, business and financial records; foundation and grant materials; employee and volunteer materials; newsletters; and other materials. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


CURRENT DISCUSSION CLUB. Records, 1920–1986.M 0065. 2 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Current Discussion Club was formed in 1920 by a group of northside Indianapolis women. Its purpose was "the discussion of current and literary topics." Membership was limited to twenty-five. The club disbanded in 1986. Materials in the collection include minutes, yearbooks, retrospective accounts written for the twenty-fifth and fiftieth anniversaries, and the constitution and bylaws.


CURRENT LITERATURE CLUB. Records, 1906–1910.BV 2078. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The club was founded about 1894 as a women's literary club in Rockville, Parke County, Indiana. The collection consists of one bound volume (1906–10) containing the club's constitution, minutes, bylaws, and lists of officers, committees, and members.


DIALOGUE TODAY (INDIANAPOLIS, IND.). RECORDS, 1984-2000.  M 0775. 5 manuscript boxes, 1 box color photographs.  Collection guide online. Dialogue Today is a coalition of African-American and Jewish women. The purpose of the organization is to consider and deal with problems common to both groups through education, advocacy, and community service projects. Teen Dialogue began in the mid 1980s as an effort to create dialogue between African-American and Jewish teenagers. The collection includes business records, correspondence, clippings, photographs, financial records and ephemera. Also included are copies of the Dialogue Today newsletter Dialogue for Dialogue.


EMERGENCY CLUB. Records, 1915–1997.M 0715, BV 1971.1 box, 1 bound volume, and 2 folders of visual materials. Collection guide online.  Founded in 1898 in Indianapolis, the Emergency Club provided layettes to indigent mothers, often helping with groceries, coal and other needs. During World War I the club made bandages for the war effort. The club identified cases through other social work and charitable groups; it remains active today.  The collection includes minute books; secretary's books; constitution and by-laws; membership lists; correspondence; newspaper clippings; president's reports; club yearbooks; photographs; and materials regarding the Visiting Nurses Association of Indianapolis and Stopover, Inc., a shelter for runaway teenagers.


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (DELPHI, INDIANA). Records, 1916–1933.SC 2549. 2 items. Collection guide online.  The First Presbyterian Church of Delphi, Carroll County, Indiana, was organized in 1828. Two women's organizations of the church were founded in 1873: the Ladies' Social Union, which raised funds; and the Woman's Missionary Society, which dealt with foreign and domestic missions. Records of the Ladies' Social Union (1916–1926) and the Woman's Missionary Society (1913–1933) at the First Presbyterian Church include information on fundraising activities; foreign missions, especially in Poland, Korea, Japan, and Mexico; and domestic missions, especially in regard to Native Americans, Mormons, African-American professionals, and Jews.


FORTNIGHTLYLITERARY CLUB. Collection.M 0585. 1 box. Collection guide online.  The Fortnightly Literary Club was founded in Indianapolis in 1923. Its purpose was for the review and discussion of books, world problems, current events, and other subjects of cultural value. The records include correspondence, minutes, and yearbooks (1927–83).


FREETOWN VILLAGE: SEAMSTRESS, WASHERWOMAN, BARBER, ROOTWOMAN. 1998.SC 2693. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  Freetown Village is a living history museum that explores the lives of African Americans in an 1870 mythical community in Indianapolis.  The members of the museum company depict composite characters that lived during the post-Civil War era.  Traditionally, some of the Freetown Village characters have included Reverend Strong, barber Isaiah Cuffee, seamstress Sarah Elizabeth Brown Cuffee, washerwoman Eliza Moore Freeman, and root woman Mother Endura.  The collection contains one project abstract and a forty-five-page research paper authored by Lisa Lewis during 1998.  The abstract provides the search strategy used to research the four trades.  The research paper examined the role of the trades giving them some context related to late nineteenth century African Americans. 


FRIENDSHIP LEAGUE. Minutes, 1903–1916.BV 2488. 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The collection consists of one notebook containing the records of two organizations. The first twenty pages contain dues accounts for charter members, probably of the Woman's Press Club of Indiana. Pages twenty to forty contain minutes of the Friendship League of Delphi, Carroll County, Indiana, a women's social club.


GENDER FAIRNESS COALITION OF INDIANA, INC. RECORDS.  1986-1996.  M 0777. 3 manuscript boxes.  Collection guide online. The Gender Fairness Coalition of Indiana, Inc., is a statewide lobby organization supporting women's rights issues in the Indiana General Assembly. The Coalition evolved from the Indiana Civil Rights Commission's Advisory Council on Sex Discrimination, which functioned during the 1970s. Jill Chambers was chair of the coalition from 1994 to 1996. The collection contains business records of the Gender Fairness Coalition of Indiana, Inc., dating primarily from 1990-96. The material includes minutes and agendas, financial reports, correspondence, and subject files concerning internal activities and political lobbying. Correspondence includes letters exchanged with other groups concerned with women's issues, including Planned Parenthood of Central Indiana.


GOVERNOR'S COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN IN INDIANA. 1973–1979.M 0661. 2 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Commission on the Status of Women in Indiana was a nonprofit state government organization established in 1973 by Gov. Otis R. Bowen. Its purpose was to ensure that women would have a full opportunity to serve as equal citizens of the state. The collection contains minutes, correspondence, newsletters, and workshop information on the commission's activities.


GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC, NELSON TRUSLER POST NO. 60. Records, 1868–1933.M 0117, BV 1330–1348, OM 0151. 4 boxes, 19 volumes, 1 folder. Collection guide in library. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-126.  The collection includes the records of the Nelson Trusler Post No. 60, Woman's Relief Corps, 1895–1920.


GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC-MORGAN POST NO. 15. Papers, 1889–1901.M 0620. 1 box. Collection guide online.  The Grand Army of the Republic, Morgan Post No. 15, Petersburg, Pike County, Indiana, was organized in 1889. The Morgan Woman's Relief Corps #146 was its auxiliary post. The collection includes a journal of the Morgan Woman's Relief Corps, 1897–1901.


GRAND BODY OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY. Collection, 1912–1977. M 0619. 5 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Grand Body of the Sisters of Charity was organized in 1876 in response to needs of post-Civil War migrant African Americans settling in Indiana. Early founders and officers included Celeste Allen, Eliza Goff, Ada Goins, Beulah Wright Porter, and Hulda Bates Webb. The organization later (1911) established a hospital in Indianapolis. Records of this organization include correspondence, constitutions and bylaws, financial records, program booklets, and news clippings. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


GRAND LODGE AUXILIARY FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE. Records, 1980, 1991.SC 2330. 1 folder. Collection guide online.  The Grand Lodge Auxiliary Fraternal Order of Police was organized in 1941 as the Ladies Auxiliary of the National Fraternal Order of Police. The Indianapolis Ladies Auxiliary #86 dates from September 1940, and the Indiana State Auxiliary Fraternal Order of Police was started in 1950. The collection is composed of three histories, including that of the Indianapolis Fraternal Order of Police Ladies Auxiliary #86, the Indiana State Auxiliary Fraternal Order of Police (1950–80), and the Grand Lodge Auxiliary Fraternal Order of Police (1941–91).


HESSVILLE DEMOCRATIC CLUB. Records, 1939–1963. M 0491. 1 box. Collection guide online.  The Hessville Democratic Club was formed in 1834 in Hammond, Lake County, Indiana, with both male and female membership. Later the men became inactive, and the women continued as the Hessville Ladies Democratic Club. In 1950 men rejoined the club, and the name reverted to the Hessville Democratic Club. The collection contains minutes of the Hessville Democratic Club (1939–43 and 1954–61), membership lists, correspondence, bylaws and amendments, and a scrapbook.


HOOSIERS FOR THE EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT (HERA), 1973–1976.M 0636. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Hoosiers for the Equal Rights Amendment (HERA) became a nonpartisan statewide coalition in August 1973. HERA's purpose was to seek ratification of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution. HERA disbanded ca. 1976–77. The records include HERA bylaws, financial reports, lists of officers, and HERA council information.


INDIANAASSOCIATION OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS FOR WOMEN. Collection, 1971–1982.  M 0648. 16 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Indiana Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (IAIAW) was organized in 1970 by seventeen Indiana colleges. Its purpose was to establish policies by which women's intercollegiate sports in Indiana would be governed and to organize state championship tournaments for women. After 1982 the NCAA absorbed women's collegiate sports activities, and the IAIAW ceased to exist. The collection includes minutes, correspondence, reports, general records, and scholarship and tournament information.


INDIANA BROADCASTERS PIONEERS FOUNDATION, INC. Oral History Project Collection, 1994–1997.  M 0744.  2 boxes, 86 audiotapes.  Collection guide online.  The Indiana Historical Society awarded the Indiana Broadcasters Pioneers Foundation, Inc., of Carmel, Indiana, a Clio grant in the amount of $25,000 on 17 August 1994.  The purpose of the grant was to assist with interviews of Indiana's early broadcasters and with the preparation of a book-length manuscript on the state's broadcast pioneers.  Interviewees include Barbara Boyd, Bettie Engelbrecht, Marthabel Geisler, and Ann Wagner Harper.


INDIANA COUNCIL OF CHURCHES. Records, 1827–1980.M 0344. 25 boxes, 7 volumes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-18.  The Indiana Council of Churches and its predecessors have worked to promote greater understanding among denominations and to provide an agency through which the denominations cooperate in special projects. Included in the records of the Indiana Council of Churches is The Indiana Churchwoman, newsletter of the Indiana Council of Church Women (1941–55).


INDIANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY WORLD WAR II PROJECT. Records, 1941–1991.  M 0652, BV 3000, OM 0318. 8 boxes, 1 volume, 5 folders.  Collection guide online. In commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of World War II the Indiana Historical Society (IHS) solicited accounts by Hoosiers of their memories of that conflict.  Over three hundred responses were received, including letters, memoirs, photographs, and documents.  A special commemorative issue of Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History (an IHS publication) was published (Fall 1991, Volume 3, Number 4), and materials collected were turned over to the IHS Library.  The collection includes materials relating to women and their activities on the home front as well as in the front lines, representing those who had served or worked with the Air Force, air transport, communications, factories, ferry pilots, finance, the Navy, nursing, and the Red Cross.


INDIANA JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Records, 1845–1998.  M 0743. 140 boxes, 54 bound volumes, 40 reels of microfilm,  30 cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  The Indiana Jewish Historical Society was founded in 1972.  Its mission is to collect, preserve, and publish material concerning Jewish life in Indiana.  The collection includes material from Jewish organizations and individuals from across Indiana.  Material related to women includes items from the Congregation B’nai Jacob and Hadassah (Fort Wayne), the National Council of Jewish Women, the Ladies Hebrew Benevolent Society (Columbia City), Temple Israel Sisterhood, Sinai Temple Sisterhood (Marion), B’nai Brith Women, and other groups.


INDIANA MEDICINE ORAL HISTORY PROJECT. Records, 1992–1995. M 0697. 3 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Indiana Medicine Oral History Project (IMOHP) focused on physicians who practiced or received their medical school education in Indiana. Participants were asked not only about their individual careers, but also about changes in the fields of medicine and medical education. Topics included family histories, medical school education, practicing medicine, how medicine has changed since the beginning of the century, rural medicine, alternative medicine, medicine during the Great Depression and World War II, minorities in medicine, the I.U. School of Medicine, and the founding of Winona Hospital. Interviewees included physicians Mary Keller Ade, Olga Bonke Booher, Naomi Dalton, Eleanor Deal, Dorothy Kreitl, Laverne Miller, Margaret Newhouse, and Edith Shuman.


INDIANA NOW. Records, 1960–.  M 0583, CT 0773–0782, CT 0784.  19 boxes, 11 cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  The National Organization for Women (NOW) is a women's rights group formed to lobby for the Equal Rights Amendment and other feminist objectives.  The Indianapolis chapter was formed in 1972.  The collection consists of correspondence between members and other groups, state conference minutes and budget materials, and state and national legislative contacts.  The collection also includes NOW bylaws and membership lists, campaign information, and news releases and publicity for mobilization meetings, marches, and special events.  Other material found in the collection includes newspaper clippings, articles, brochures, and photographs.


INDIANA POSTCARDS: BRENNER AND DOBBINS. 1903–1980. P 0336. 2 boxes. No collection guide available.Aluhah Gertrude Dobbins and John Brenner, Jr., worked as stenographers for various firms in Indianapolis from ca. 1906 to the late 1930s. It is not known if these individuals were friends. The collection contains 122 mechanically reproduced postcards  and fifty-nine photographic postcards depicting Indiana scenes. The images include courthouses, and views of Odom, Indianapolis, Martinsville, and Bloomington, Indiana.


INDIANA STATE NURSES ASSOCIATION. Records, 1887–1979.M 0380. 20 boxes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-186.  The Indiana State Nurses Association was founded in 1903 to work for an improvement in the status, working conditions, and training of nurses. The association has lobbied for the registration of nurses and improved educational programs; provided placement services and insurance and savings plans for members; and worked with other organizations on a variety of public health problems. The records include minutes and reports for the association's annual meetings; correspondence, memoranda, membership information, financial records, and other papers from the state headquarters in Indianapolis; records of the professional registry and the counseling and placement programs; papers of association committees, including joint committees with other state health organizations; minutes, correspondence, reports, and registry records for the association's districts; correspondence and reports of the American Nurses Association; and minutes and correspondence of the Indiana Committee on Nursing.


INDIANA WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION. Record book, 1851–1886.  BV 2577,SC 1792. 1 bound volume, 5 folders.  Collection guide online.  This collection contains the preamble and constitution of the Woman's Rights Association of Indiana. Names of charter members, minutes of annual meetings (1851–59, 1869–81), and an 1870 treasurer's report are included.  The organization changed its name to Indiana Woman's Suffrage Association in 1869.


INDIANA WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS. Records, 1967–1983.M 0709, OMB 0072. 9 boxes, 1 oversize box, 4 artifacts.  Collection guide online.  The Indiana Women's Political Caucus and the Greater Indianapolis caucus were formed in October 1971 as affiliates of the National Women's Political Caucus, a multi-partisan organization. The organizational meeting of the IWPC was chaired by prominent Indianapolis attorney Virginia Dill McCarty (b. 1924) and Rae Ginger, temporary state coordinators appointed by the national caucus. The goal of each caucus was to advance the status of women through political action. Major issues pursued by the organizations were passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), equal pay and job opportunities for women, and more women in policy-making positions in politics and government. The focus of the state and Indianapolis caucuses during the campaign year of 1972 was on the ERA. Indianapolis native and NWPC spokesperson Jill Ruckelshaus was instrumental in getting the national Republican Party to include the ERA as part of its platform. The collection consists of the records (1971–1983) of the Indiana Women's Political Caucus created or collected by president Molly P. Rucker. Included are records relating to the Greater Indianapolis Women's Political Caucus (ca. 1971–1978) and the National Women's Political Caucus (1971–1983). Also present are subject files on the Equal Rights Amendment, International Women's Year, and records relating to the Julian Center, a human services organization for women founded in 1975 by the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis.


INDIANAPOLIS ARCHDIOCESAN COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC WOMEN. Records, 1938–1992. M 0633.  9 boxes. Collection guide online.  The Indianapolis Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women was founded in 1938. It is a member of the National Council of Catholic Women and seeks to unite Catholic organizations and Catholic women in purpose, direction, and action in religious, educational, social, and economic fields. The collection consists of the records and correspondence of the Indianapolis Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women, its local deanery councils, and its commissions or committees, 1938–92.


INDIANAPOLIS ASYLUM FOR FRIENDLESS COLORED CHILDREN. Records, 1870–1922.  M 0165, BV 1501–1509. 14 boxes, 9 volumes.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-188.  The asylum was founded in 1869 by a group of Indianapolis Friends as an orphanage for African American children from Indianapolis and central Indiana. A Board of Women Managers whose president served as director of the asylum and a male Board of Directors who managed the financial affairs operated the asylum. In 1922 control of the orphanage was given to the Marion County Board of Commissioners, and it was closed during the 1940s. While the bulk of the collection relates to the children and their families, the collection also includes minutes of the Board of Women Managers (1870–1922) and treasurers' reports (1916–22).


INDIANAPOLIS FLOWER MISSION. Records, 1884–1987. M 0071. 8 boxes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-194.  The Indianapolis Flower Mission was a women's organization started in 1876 to provide care for the sick. The mission's activities have included visiting the sick in hospitals and at their homes, providing instruction in the care of the sick, starting a training school for nurses (1883), operating a children's hospital (1895–1909), and opening hospitals for the care of tuberculosis patients (1903, 1935). The mission's records include minutes of board of directors meetings (1901–48), reports of visitors to the sick (1931–33), and miscellaneous reports, correspondence, and historical materials.


INDIANAPOLIS FREE KINDERGARTEN, 1881–1972.  M 0166, BV 1510–1551, OM 0298. 3 boxes, 42 volumes, 1 folder. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-195.  The society was founded in 1882 under the leadership of Rev. Oscar C. McCulloch and Eliza Blaker as a private organization to provide preschool training for young children. At various times the society also provided domestic training classes for older children; mothers' clubs to instruct women in child care, health, and nutrition; health examinations and training for the children; and clothing for poor children. In 1901 the society began receiving public funds for its schools. The society was dissolved about 1951. The collection includes superintendents' reports; directors' reports; board meeting minutes; treasurers' books; correspondence; papers on the history of the society; and business papers.


INDIANAPOLIS GARDEN CLUB. Records 1930–1996.M 0672, OMB 0059, BV 3059. 6 boxes, 1 volume. Collection guide online.  The Indianapolis Garden Club was formed in 1930 by a group of northside Indianapolis women led by Mrs. John N. Carey. Committees were appointed for the conservation of plants and trees, roadside improvement, and horticultural shows. It became a charter member of the Indiana Federation of Garden Clubs in 1937 and was admitted to the Garden Club of America in 1940. Records of the early decades of the Garden Club are incomplete, but from 1965 records of the clubs' activities are well represented. The collection includes minutes, reports, clippings, photographs, and correspondence, 1930–60.


INDIANAPOLIS MUSIC PROMOTERS. Collection, 1903–1977.M 0635. 1 box. Collection guide online.  Adelaide Thornton Riley and Ellen Thomas Merriwether founded the Indianapolis Music Promoters in 1919 as a branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The purpose of the club was to encourage pursuit of musical study and foster musical talent of youth. Records of this club include correspondence, yearbooks, and program booklets. Black Women in the Middle West Project.


INDIANAPOLIS ORPHANS ASYLUM. Records, 1850–1923.M 0066, BV 0984–0995. 1 box, 12 volumes. No collection guide available. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-196.  The Indianapolis Orphans Asylum was founded in 1850 as the Widows and Orphans Friend Society of Indianapolis. By 1866 it had become the Indianapolis Orphans Asylum, a private organization responsible for operating the city's principal orphanage. The orphans home was discontinued in 1941. The records consist of minutes of board meetings; indentures of children; children's records; records of children in the foundling ward; and accounts.


INDIANAPOLIS PATRONESS CLUB OF ZETA CHAPTER, SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, Records, 1944–1994.  M 0695, OMB 0067.  2 boxes and 1 oversize box.  Collection guide online.  Sigma Alpha Iota, a professional music fraternity for women in music, was founded in 1903.  The Patroness Club of the Zeta Chapter of SAI at Butler University, Indianapolis, was formed in 1911 as an alumnae organization to support the local and national organizations.  The Patroness Club provided scholarships for music students at Butler's Jordan College of Fine Arts and placed opera scores in the Fine Arts Library of Jordan College.  Membership was by invitation only; it disbanded in 1994.  Records include bylaws, minutes and reports, SAI songbooks, a guest book, and a scrapbook.  The scrapbook includes newspaper clippings and programs dealing with the Patroness Club and musical events in Indianapolis.


INDIANAPOLIS PROPYLAEUM. Records, 1888–1997.M 0699, BV 3200–3201, BV 3209–3220, OMB 0070,  F 1217, CT 0795. 64 boxes, 5 oversize boxes, 14 bound volumes, 1 reel microfilm, 1 cassette tape, and 3 boxes of photographs. Collection guide online.  The Indianapolis Propylaeum, founded in 1888, began as a stock company to build and maintain a building for the use of women's clubs. The first building, opened in 1891, was torn down to build the War Memorial Plaza and the Propylaeum moved to the Schmidt-Schaf House in 1923. A cultural and social haven for Indianapolis women, a number of groups continue to meet there, including the Indianapolis Woman's Club and the Fortnightly Literary Club. Included in the collection are minutes, annual reports, yearbooks and membership rosters, publications, organizational histories, newsclippings, stockholder information, program committee materials, and daily diaries of activities. Financial and legal materials include treasurers' reports, building rental records, tax records, bank statements, leases, and building operation and maintenance records. Also included are records of several clubs that met there, including the Indianapolis Woman's Club, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and the Fortnightly Literary Club; photographs; and artifacts.


INDIANAPOLIS RETIREMENT HOME. Records, 1867–1980.M 0519, BV 2513–2535, OM 0229, F 0237,  F 0239. 9 boxes, 23 volumes, 1 folder, 2 microfilm reels.  Collection guide online.  The organization was incorporated in 1867 under the name The Indianapolis Home for Friendless Women. Although originally created to care for children and transient women as well as the aged, by 1913 the institution limited its care to just the aged and changed its name to the Indianapolis Home for Aged Women. In 1936 the home became a nonprofit corporation under its current title. The collection contains minutes of the board of directors, financial records, and correspondence.


INDIANAPOLIS WOMAN'S CLUB. Records, 1875–.  M 0478, BV 2308–2329a.  12 boxes, 23 bound volumes, cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  The club was founded in 1875 and is the oldest of its type in Indiana.  Its purpose, as set forth in its constitution, is "to form an organized center for the mental and social culture of its members and for the improvement of domestic life."  Materials in the collection include meeting minutes, officers' reports, printed yearbooks, programs and announcements, and anniversary materials.


INDIANAPOLIS YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. Records, 1896–1986.M 0485, BV 2373–2387, OM 0185, F 0997–1010, 11 boxes, 15 volumes, 1 folder, 14 microfilm reels.  Collection guide online.  The Indianapolis YWCA, founded in 1894 to help young women living alone in the city, opened a facility at 139 North Meridian Street in 1895. After years of being located at 329 North Pennsylvania, the YWCA moved in 1976 to North Guion Road. The YWCA has sponsored educational, recreational, and religious activities. The collection includes the minutes, correspondence, publications, and scrapbooks of the Indianapolis YWCA. The publications are national and local newsletters.


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S YEAR. Records, 1975–1985.M 0545, CT 0440–0450. 6 boxes, 11 cassette tapes. Collection guide online.  Created by the United Nations to call attention to women's issues, the International Women's Year became the International Women's Decade. This collection contains administrative records for the Indiana Committee as well as newsletters, speeches, and interviews.


IRVINGTON MOTHERS CLUB. Minutes, 1910–1917.SC 1665, BV 1808. 1 folder, 1 volume. No collection guide available.  The Irvington Mothers Club later became the Parent-Teacher Association of the George W. Julian School (School 57) and then the Irvington Parent-Teacher Association. This collection includes the constitution and bylaws as well as the minutes of the club.


JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION OF INDIANAPOLIS. Records, 1903–.M 0463, OMB 0013. 362 boxes. Collection guide online. Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-204.  The Jewish Welfare Federation of Indianapolis was established in 1905 as the Jewish Federation to centralize fund-raising and allocate funds to support local and national Jewish organizations. Initially the federation, which consisted of existing immigrant aid societies such as the Industrial Removal Organization and the Hebrew Ladies Benevolent Society, provided social services to the poor in the Jewish immigrant community through financial support, employment opportunities, health care, and assistance in adjusting to American life. In the 1920s the organization's interests shifted to Jewish community-related projects such as the Kirshbaum Center. The collection consists of records, correspondence, and printed materials pertaining to the Jewish Welfare Federation, its member organizations, including the Women's and Young Matrons' divisions, and its predecessor organizations.


LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF INDIANA. Records, 1910–1978.M 0612, BV 2662–2665, OM274. 91 boxes, 5 volumes, 7 folders.  Collection guide in library.  The League of Women Voters was formed from the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1920 after women won the right to vote.  The same year the Indiana League affiliate was organized from the Woman's Franchise League of Indiana.  This collection contains information from the local, state, and national leagues.  Organizational and administrative papers of the state league comprise the bulk of the collection, and there are also state and national newsletters.


LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF INDIANAPOLIS. Records, 1915–1986.M 0611, OMB 0044. 30 boxes.  Collection guide online.  The League of Women Voters of Indianapolis was organized by July 1920 and is affiliated with both the national and state League of Women Voters.  The collection consists of minutes, annual reports, correspondence and papers, membership rosters, newsletters, brochures, newsclippings, scrapbooks, and materials relating to various political issues.


LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF THE CALUMET (IND.) AREA. Records, 1987–2000.SC 2687. 5 folders. Collection guide online. The Leagueof Women Votersof the Calumet (Ind.) Area is a branch of the Leagueof Women Voters(LWV), a nation-wide public interest group. The Calumet Area branch participates in the activities of the national organization and has organized state and regional programs related to child welfare, environmental management, and budget reform.  The collection includes correspondence and printed material pertaining to leagueactivities concerning social welfare programs and environmental issues.


MANCHESTERUNION TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. Records, ca. 1847–1857.SC 1627. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  The collection contains one document, a preamble, constitution, and list of temperance subscribers for the Manchester Union Temperance Society.  The document is undated, but from internal evidence it would seem to have been created between 1847 and 1857.  The Manchester Union Temperance Society was organized in the town of Manchester (now North Manchester) on the Eel River in Wabash County, Indiana, to conquer "King Alcohol."


McCUTCHANVILLE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB. Records, 1936–1942. SC 2464. 3 folders.  Collection guide online.  The home economics club of McCutchanville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana, was organized in 1936 with about twenty members.  Its purpose was to create a good community spirit, sociability, and neighborliness and to carry on the work of the Purdue Extension.  Minutes and attendance records of meetings form the bulk of this collection.


ME-DE-PHAR GUILD. RECORDS, 1944-1989.  M 0761.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  African-American organization.  Founded in 1944, the Me-De-Phar Guild included the wives, mothers, daughters, and sisters of physicians, dentists, and pharmacists.  Membership now includes spouses of retired and deceased medical professionals and medical students.  The guild was created to promote good health facilities, to establish better relations between the community and health professionals, and to provide financial aid to women wishing to enter a branch of the allied health fields.


MONDAY CLUB. Records, 1895–1975.  SC 1101.  8 folders.  Collection guide online.  The Monday Club was organized in 1895 as an auxiliary of Central Christian Church in Indianapolis.  It began in the home of Mrs. Patrick H. Jameson as the Zerelda Wallace Conversation Club in honor of a pioneer Indiana temperance leader.  The name changed, first to Monday Afternoon Club, and then about 1901 to Monday Club.  The club began by emphasizing extemporaneous conversations on specific topics and later included musical performances and guest speakers.  It survived to celebrate its seventy-fifth anniversary.  The collection includes papers, minutes, and clippings.


MORGAN COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUB. Programs, 1935–1960. SC 1085. 4 folders.  Collection guide online.  The Morgan County Home Demonstration Club, formerly the Morgan County Home Economics Club, was located in Morgan County, Indiana.  A women's club, it met monthly to discuss topics related to home economics.  Twenty annual programs from the club, including most years between 1935 and 1960, list club members, officers, committees, and agendas.


MOTHERS' CORRESPONDENCE CLUB. Records, 1915–1921.BV 1995. 1 volume.  No collection guide available.  This organization was founded in Indianapolis with a branch in Philadelphia.  Its purpose was to uplift the morale of men in the armed forces.  The collection includes a minute book and membership lists.


MUTUAL SERVICE ASSOCIATION. Records, 1907–1981.M 0374, BV 2022–2023, OM 0094. 2 boxes, 2 volumes, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-279.  The Mutual Service Association was organized in 1903 by Indianapolis businesswomen to provide respectable housing and financial assistance to young working women.  Until 1927 the organization owned a residence and summer camp for women who could not afford vacations outside the city.  Since 1967 the association has owned an apartment complex and retirement home for women.  The records include the association's minutes, treasurers' records, scrapbooks, membership lists, meeting programs, and issues of the Mutual Service Journal.


NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN-INDIANAPOLIS SECTION. Collection, 1915–1985.M 0539, OM 0280.  8 boxes, 2 folders.  Collection guide online.  The Indianapolis Section of the National Council of Negro Women was established to promote unity of action among all women in matters affecting the educational, cultural, economic, social, and political life of the community; to collect, preserve, and promote information affecting women; and to work toward the elimination of discrimination and segregation.  Records in this collection include the constitution and bylaws, correspondence, agendas and minutes, reports, directories, brochures, yearbooks, and biographical information on various Indiana African American women, organizations, and institutions, most notably the Top Ladies of Distinction, an Indianapolis social club.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


NATIONAL SOCIETY OF ARTS AND LETTERS, (INDIANA CHAPTER). Records, 1945–1996.M 0579, OMB 0041.  7 boxes.  Collection guide online.  Mrs. Jesse W. Nicholson and Mrs. A. E. Neilson in Washington, D.C founded the National Society of Arts and Letters, an organization to encourage young people in the arts and literature, in 1945.  An Indiana chapter was founded shortly thereafter by Carrie Abbott Guio in Indianapolis.  The collection includes correspondence, lists, yearbooks, booklets, and clippings relating to both the national and state organization.


NATIONAL SOCIETY UNITED STATES DAUGHTERS OF 1812, Philip Schoff Chapter Scrapbook, 1911–1930.BV 3056. 1 volume.  Collection guide online.  The National Society United States Daughters of 1812 (NSUSD 1812) was formed in 1897 to promote patriotism.  The Philip Schaff Chapter of the NSUSD 1812 was organized in 1911.  The scrapbook, kept by Alma Winston Winslow, historian of the chapter, 1911–30, contains programs, reports, bylaws, and constitutions of the national and local organizations, clippings, and several leaflets from the National Security League.


NATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION FOR INDIANA. Records, 1887–1893.BV 2612. 1 volume.  Collection guide available.  The Indiana National Woman Suffrage Association was started in 1887 with May Wright Sewall as chairman and Helen M. Gougar as president.  The collection consists of a minute book (1887–93) for the state organization.


NEW HARMONY Collection, 1814–1884.M 0219, BV 0830–0835, F 0242.  4 boxes, 6 volumes, 1 microfilm reel.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-282.  Frances Wright (1795–1852) was an author, journalist, and social activist. She delivered numerous lectures attacking slavery and organized religion and advocating women's suffrage.  Sarah Tittle Barrett Bolton (1814–1893) was a poet and suffragist.  She was born in Newport, Kentucky, the oldest of six children of Esther Pendleton and Jonathan Belcher Barrett.  The family moved to a frontier farm in Indiana on Six-Mile Creek northeast of Vernon in Jennings County while Bolton was still a child.  She married Nathaniel Bolton of Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana, an editor, in 1831.  She married second, Addison Reese.  Bolton was a leader in the early movement for women's legal rights and aided Robert Dale Owen in his successful fight in the State Constitutional Convention of 1850 and the legislature of 1851 for personal property rights for married women.  The collection includes letters from Frances Wright and letters to Sarah T. Bolton.


NEW YORK CENTRAL SYSTEM PHOTOGRAPHS: JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY TRAIN.1941.P 0027.1 folder.Collection guide in library. The collection contains thirteen black-and-white photographs that document the introduction of the James Whitcomb Riley diesel passenger train on the New York Central Railway line in April 1941. Included are four photographs of Mari Schricker, wife of Indiana Governor Henry F. Schricker. Other images of women include passengers, possibly models, in the train’s coaches and dining car.


PHYLLIS WHEATLEY YMCA, Collection, 1897–1955.M 0494, OM 0300.  1 box, 3 folders.  Collection guide online.  The Phyllis Wheatley Branch of the Indianapolis YWCA was established in 1923 as the first and only independent black YWCA in America and was named after a famous African American poet.  By 1928 the organization was located at 601 West Street and became a hub of cultural and educational activity.  The organization offered concerts, plays, and various seminars and conferences, as well as practical classes and recreation.  The branch closed in 1959.  The collection consists of pamphlets, programs, news clippings, and newsletters for the branch, as well as newsletters from the Senate Avenue Branch of the YMCA.  Most materials date from the 1930s.


PI LAMBDA THETA INDIANAPOLIS CHAPTER. Records, 1929–1983.M 0392, BV 2037–2040d.  4 boxes, 7 volumes.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-298.  Pi Lambda Theta is a national honorary society for women in education.  The Indianapolis chapter was founded in 1929 by women from Indiana University.  The chapter has provided scholarships for Indianapolis area college students, honored outstanding high school students, given recognition to professional women in the field, and contributed to charitable causes.  The collection contains the chapter's minutes, financial records, membership directories, constitution and bylaws, scrapbooks, and records of the Honors Day programs for high school students.


PIERIAN STUDY CLUB. Records, 1926–1993. M 0176. 2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  The Pierian Study Club was founded in 1926 "to study literature and drama and to encourage an interchange of thought by papers and discourse and to promote original work and expression."  Members, limited to twenty, came primarily from the north and east sides of Indianapolis, although there were a few from Southport and Franklin.  The club was disbanded in 1993.  The collection includes minutes, yearbooks, and historical recollections from the years 1926 to 1993.


PLANNED PARENTHOOD ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL INDIANA. Records, 1932–1985.M 0468,  BV 2252–2254, OMB 0053.  16 boxes, 3 volumes.  Collection guide online.  The Central Indiana branch of the organization was established in 1932 as the Indiana Birth Control League; it became the Maternal Health League of Indiana in 1934.  The first clinic was established in 1933 in Indianapolis and served only married women with two or more children who were referred by a physician or social agency.  By the mid-l950s the association expanded from traditional birth control services into the areas of premarital counseling, service to teens, and infertility services.  The bulk of the collection contains records after 1970.  Records predating this consist mainly of board of directors' minutes and related materials.


PLEASANT RUN CHILDREN'S HOME. Records, 1867–.M 0227, BV 1700–1788, BV 1884–1885,  BV 1920–1922.  6 boxes, 14 volumes, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-300.  Pleasant Run Children's Home was founded in 1867 by an Indianapolis German fraternal organization.  It became the General Protestant Orphan Association in 1918 and changed to its present name in 1971.  Among the records in this collection are minutes of meetings of the ladies auxiliary (1902–18).


PRAIRIE TREK EXPEDITIONS. Records, 1925–1978.M 0390, BV 2692–2693, OM 0108. 18 boxes, 2 volumes, 3 folders.  Collection guide in library.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-304.  Prairie Trek Expeditions was organized in 1926 by Hillis L. Howie, an Indianapolis teacher and Boy Scout leader, as a summer wilderness program in the Southwest.  Originally designed for boys, separate expeditions were created for girls.  The collection includes board minutes, financial records, ledgers, and papers concerning the operation of the program; published accounts of each trek's experiences; and scrapbooks, songs, cookbooks, and recipe cards.


PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY CLUB. Collection, 1940–1982. M 0531. 2 boxes.  Collection guide online. Part of the Black Women in the Middle West Project.  The Progressive Community Club was an African American community improvement group in Indianapolis.  It sponsored educational programs, established scholarship funds, and encouraged members to vote.  In 1956 the club became a member of the Federation of Associated Clubs, an organization of African American social clubs formed in 1937 to improve living and working conditions in the city.  Records from the Progressive Community Club and the Federation of Associated Clubs include correspondence, minutes, programs, fundraising materials, newsletters, and photographs.  Photographs of unidentified groups and individuals are probably associated with the Federation of Associated Clubs.


RECLAIMING A GERMAN AMERICAN PAST: THE DUBOIS COUNTY AREA ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS, 1993–1994. SC 2568. 3 folders. Collection guide online. The collection is comprised of oral history transcripts from interviews with Lillian Doane (23 October 1993) and Norbert Krapf (6 August 1993). Lillian Doane, a lifelong resident of Dubois County, reminiscences about family, and community life in the German-American community of  Jasper, Indiana. She also discusses the genealogy of the Fehrenbach family of Germany and the United States.


“REMEMBERING INDIANA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.”  M 0704.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  This collection consists of fifteen transcripts of interviews that were completed as part of a project entitled "Remembering Indiana in the Twentieth Century."  Six of the interviews relate to Indianapolis; one to Tell City (Labhart); and the others relate to Evansville.  All of the interviews discuss the individuals' family and personal histories, and the city or area where they lived. Interviewees include Hazel Hayden, Mildred Kuhlenschmidt, Alberta Murphy, Mary Brookins, Ida Edelen, Alice Hottenstein, Marcella Massey, Mary-Jane Koch, Dee Margardant, and Mary E. Trabits.


REVIEWCLUB. Records, 1922–1994.M 0437. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  The Review Club was organized in 1922 by a group of about twenty northside Indianapolis women.  They planned a program of book reviews that over the years came to include professional speakers, trips around the state to visit libraries, and even a club quartet.  The club disbanded in 1994.  Historical material related to the club and its activities form the bulk of this collection.


RIPLEY COUNTY PHOTOGRAPHS BY VIOLET E. TOPH AND FRANK TUCKER. 1940.  P 0322.1 folder.Collection guide online.  Violet E. Toph  (1878–ca. 1966) was born near Elrod, Indiana and attended Ripley County schools and Hanover College. A resident of Versailles, she taught school in Ripley County and was the first secretary of the Ripley County Historical Society. The collection contains eight hand-colored photographs of landscapes and bridges in Ripley County, Ind. Violet Toph made seven items and Frank Tucker made one image, a photograph of the Ohio Southwestern Railroad bridge over Laughery Creek.  


SAMMY GIRLS Collection, 1914–1926.M 0453. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  The Sammy Girls, a local women's organization centered in Lewisville, Indiana, was organized in 1914 to write letters and send other useful articles to servicemen at home and abroad during World War I.  Members wrote primarily to army men and always as Sammy Girls, never under their own names.  The Sammy Girls were most active from early 1918 through July 1919.  Most of the nearly two hundred letters and postcards are replies from servicemen to letters and packages and as such shed much less light on the women's organization itself than the soldier's army life.


SENIOR LAWYERS PROJECT. Collection, 1968–1991.M 0574, BV 2598–2604, BV 2616–2660, CT 0470–0516, CT 0518–0567. 5 boxes, 13 volumes, 107 cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  This collection includes oral history interviews with twelve lawyers, transcripts, and supporting documentation on such diverse topics as rural electrification, Indianapolis-Unigov, and legal culture and civil rights.  Jeanne S. Miller, an attorney from the Fort Wayne, Allen County, area, was interviewed on women and the legal culture and civil rights.


SIGMA DELTA PI. Records, 1930–1982.M 0588. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  The Sigma Delta Pi Sorority was organized in 1906 by Versie Case Kramer at the Teacher's College of Indianapolis as a professional educators sorority.  The collection includes an historical sketch and constitution of the organization, copies of its publication, The Link, and bulletins and booklets from Teacher's College of Indianapolis and Butler University.


SOCIAL SEWING SOCIETY. Records, 1851–1862.SC 2349. 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  The Social Sewing Society of Greene County(?) was formed by the ladies of Green (sic) in 1851 to aid the destitute and promote benevolence.  The organization was apparently affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  The volume contains the organization's constitution, membership list, regulations, and meeting minutes.


SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (CONSERVATIVE) WESTERN YEARLY MEETING EPISTLES. Letter,1880-1890.SC 2607. 2 folders.  Collection guide in library.  The collection consists of epistles written to the women of the SocietyofFriends(Conservative)Western Yearly Meeting (Plainfield, IN) from women ofother yearly meetings in New England, Kansas, Ohio, Iowa, and Ontario.


SOJOURNER TRUTH CLUB. Records, 1922–1975. M 0540. 2 boxes.  Collection guide online.  The Sojourner Truth Club was organized in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, in 1921.  It sponsored health programs, a college scholarship, and support for the needy.  Records in this collection include its constitution and bylaws, correspondence, and minutes.


SPIRIT OF 76. Scroll Play, 1876.M 0627. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  The collection consists of a play apparently written in 1876 and set in the Boston, Massachusetts, area.  The play is a satire on role-reversal between the sexes.  The protagonist returns home after ten years in China to discover men darning socks and women working as tax assessors and judges.  Eventually he is proposed to by one of the women.


VINCENTCHAUTAUQUA LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC CLUB MINUTES, 1908–1973.M 0505, BV 2492–2495. 1 box, 4 volumes.  Collection guide online.  Vincent Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Club of Indianapolis was formed by Mrs. M. J. Allison in 1908 to study books and engage in volunteer work.  It affiliated with the Local Council of Women in April of 1916 and by November 1919 united with the Indiana Federation of Clubs.  It disbanded during the 1970s.  The bulk of this collection consists of meeting minutes, but also includes programs, yearbooks, officers and membership lists, constitution, and bylaws.


WARWICK: A HISTORY OF THE MIDWESTERN RURAL VILLAGE. IHRG Project, 1995-1996.  M 0685.  1 box.  Collection guide online.  This oral history project was part of an Indiana Heritage Research Grant (#95-3014) awarded to the Northern Indiana Historical Society in 1995.  This collection consists of an abstract for the project, oral history typescripts, interview questions, summaries, material concerning presentations on the project, and photocopies of newspaper articles.  Interviews took place between May 1995 and February 1996.  The interviewees discuss family histories, Warwick, the Chicago Trail (Chicago Road), and the John Reynolds farmstead.  Interviewees include: Carmen Foster, Ann Fox, Ruth James, Mary Margaret Marker, Nell Morehouse, Kathy Shand, and Susan (Fox) Walls.


WABASH COLLEGE ORAL HISTORY PROJECT Collection.M 0647, CT 0593–0701. 3 boxes, 109 cassette tapes.  Collection guide online.  As part of Wabash College's sesquicentennial celebration, faculty of the Minority Studies Committee proposed an oral history project focused on African Americans at Wabash.  The project was expanded to include the city of Crawfordsville.  The collection includes interviews with the following women: Edith Reed, Frances Wooden, Mrs. Sam Churchill, Leona Mitchell, Helen Eubank, Jasmine Robinson, Peggy Wooden, Madonna Robinson, Maxine Burdett, Elsie Bard, Elizabeth Smith, Betty Lee, Brenda Barbee, Pat Johnson, Gwen Dudley, Briana Robinson, Rebecca Powell, Tracey Smith, Pam Turner, Pat Turner, Katrynka Eubank, Shannon Barbee, Rose Olabegi Adesiyan, and Nancy Servies.


WHITING, INDIANA GENERATIONAL MEMORY IN MODERN AMERICA. Oral history project, 1990–1993.F 1188–1189.  2 microfilm reels.  Collection guide online.  A grant-funded research project that investigated differences between the memories and values of a generation in the United States and the impact of historic events upon the creation of those memories and values in creating a "generation."  Memories of people living during the Great Depression and World War II were contrasted with those individuals living after World War II.  There were fifty-two interviews with sixty-six people interviewed, seventeen of which were interviewed as couples. Thirty-two women were interviewed.


WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. Records, 1915–1932.SC 2278. 2 folders.  No collection guide in library.  Sadie E. (Jackson) York held state offices in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and was active in the Meridian WCTU.  Lewis E. York was a member of the Illinois State Legislature (1904–08) and superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Indiana (1926–47).  The collection contains correspondence, obituaries, magazines, and other materials concerning the WCTU and Anti-Saloon League in connection with Sadie E. and Lewis E. York.


WOMAN'S FRANCHISE LEAGUE OF INDIANA. Records, 1914–1919. SC 1761. 3 folders.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-403.  The Woman's Franchise League was a predecessor of the League of Women Voters.  The collection consists of league records from the period 1917–19, including printed suffrage campaign leaflets and training materials for campaign workers; correspondence from the league's state headquarters in Peru, Miami County; financial reports; and clippings on the suffrage movement.


WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. Records, 1910–1913.SC 2350. 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  The national Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, established in 1880 in Cincinnati, Ohio, was formed to aid women in the South and the West, Mormon women, and missionaries throughout the country.  In Indiana the society raised funds for the establishment of Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis from 1907–8, and in 1912 it established an Italian Mission in the same city.  The collection consists of the Auxiliary Treasurer's Book for the North Indiana Conference of the Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church from 1910 to 1913.


WOMAN'S IMPROVEMENT CLUB. Collection, 1909–1965.M 0432. 1 box.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-404.  The Woman's Improvement Club, organized in 1903 by Indianapolis journalist Lillian Thomas Fox, promoted civic activities and sponsored self-improvement programs for African American women in Indianapolis.  Among the club's activities was the sponsorship of an open-air camp near Indianapolis for black tuberculosis patients.  The records include minutes, financial records, correspondence regarding club activities, membership lists, and club constitutions.  Black Women in the Middle West Project.


WOMAN'S PRESS CLUB OF INDIANA. Records, 1913–1988.M 0373, BV 1991–1993. 11 boxes, 3 volumes.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-405.  The Woman's Press Club of Indiana started in 1913 as a social and professional organization for women reporters and writers and is a charter member of the National Federation of Press Women.  The records consist of the club's minutes and correspondence, financial reports and papers, membership and attendance lists, publications, scrapbooks, and clippings on the activities of the club and its members.


WOMAN'S ROTARY CLUB. Records, 1979–1997.  M 0735.  1 box, 5 folders of photographs.  Collection guide online.  The Woman's Rotary Club of Indianapolis was organized in 1919 by a group of local businesswomen.  Membership was by invitation, but was open to any woman engaged in a profession or position of responsibility.  The club's goals were to promote the business interest of all members; establish high ethical standards in business and the professions; promote acquaintance as an opportunity for service and as an aid to success; maintain interest in all public movement and civic development; and provide scholarships.  The organization was non-political and had no affiliation with Rotary International.  The club concluded its operations in 1997 when the Rotary International began accepting women members.  The collection includes by-laws; historical information; yearbooks/membership lists; and the club's newsletter, The Wheel.  Other items include board materials presidential files, and news clippings and magazine articles containing information regarding the club's activities.  Visual materials in the collection include photographs of the club's fashion shows as well as the 1993 Christmas program and several other functions from the 1990s.


WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS, INC. Records, 1915–  M 0375,  OMB 0052.  47 boxes, 1 folder.  Collection guide online.  Described in Pumroy and Brockman, Guide to Manuscript Collections of the Indiana Historical Society and Indiana State Library, A-406.  Women in Communications, Inc., was founded in 1960 as Theta Sigma journalism.  It has been active in providing training in communications work, in promoting professional recognition for women in the communications field, and lobbying for legislation relating to communications and equal rights for women.  The current name was adopted in 1972.  The Indianapolis chapter was started in 1928 by students at Butler and DePauw Universities.  The records include bylaws and constitutions; minutes; financial statements and reports; correspondence; clippings and scrapbooks; membership lists and initiation materials; papers relating to the Women in Communications scholarship, membership, and awards programs for young people; meeting materials and reports; and local and national publications.


WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION FOR NATIONAL PROHIBITION REFORM. Records, 1931–1933.  SC 1631. 1 folder.  Collection guide in library.  The collection includes minutes (1931–33) for this Marion County group.  They provide a resume of activities, including the temporary merging of Marion County Women's Organization for National Prohibition Reform with the Marion County Non-Partisan Repeal Committee.