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IHS Wraps Up Indiana Experience Opening Week with Ninth Annual Circus Day

Feb. 28, 2010

Indianapolis—The Indiana Historical Society will conclude Indiana Experience opening week with one of its most popular events—the Ninth Annual Circus Day will take place Saturday, March 27, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center. The History Center is located at 450 W. Ohio St. in downtown Indianapolis.

This celebration of Indiana’s circus history will feature performances from the Peru Amateur Circus, Key School Circus, and Snakehead Ed. Other entertainment elements include clowns, magic, juggling, humor and more. From 3-5 p.m., Radio Disney will also be onsite with music, games and prizes.

Activities also include face painting, balloon sculpture, crafts, photo opportunities, carnival games and a calliope. The Stardust Terrace Café, operated by Hoaglin To Go, will be open, and snacks will be available for purchase.

Circus Day is included with admission to the Indiana Experience, and each attendee will receive 10 free game tickets. Circus Day is presented by Day Nursery.

For more information about Circus Day, the Indiana Experience, or other IHS programs and events, call (317) 232-1882 or visit www.indianahistory.org.

About Indiana’s Circus Connections
Indiana’s connection to the circus industry dates back to the late 1800s, when businessmen from a number of Indiana cities assembled traveling “mud shows” featuring exotic animals, performers, clowns and human oddities. 

By the early 1900s, the circus industry had grown—becoming the most popular form of entertainment in the United States. A number of the nation’s premier shows set up winter quarters in Indiana, establishing a lasting link between the circus and the Hoosier state. Today, Peru, Ind., is home to the world’s largest amateur circus and the International Circus Hall of Fame.

About the Indiana Historical Society
Since 1830, the Indiana Historical Society has been Indiana’s Storyteller™, connecting people to the past by collecting, preserving, interpreting and sharing the state's history. A private, nonprofit membership organization, IHS maintains the nation's premier research library and archives on the history of Indiana and the Old Northwest. IHS also provides support and assistance to local museums and historical groups, publishes books and periodicals; sponsors teacher workshops; and provides youth, adult and family programming. The Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center, home of the IHS, is located at 450 W. Ohio St. in downtown Indianapolis.

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